7:54 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

State argues Snyder should not be required to testify in lawsuit over Detroit bankruptcy

Lead in text: 
Unions wants governor and other officials to give deposition
Testimony by Gov. Rick Snyder and other state officials on Detroit's eligibility for bankruptcy is not relevant and involves privileged information, the Attorney General's office said in a document filed late Monday in advance of Tuesday's hearing on the matter. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Stephen Rhodes at 10 a.m.
7:43 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Kalamazoo Airport director on leave

Lead in text: 
Airport authority board met last week, but took no action other than saying it will follow attorney's advice
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - The director of the Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport is on leave following a harassment complaint from an employer. Thom Canny, corporate counsel for Kalamazoo County, said Monday that Cliff Moshoginis is currently on leave. However, Canny refused to say if the leave was paid or unpaid or provide a reason for the leave.
Found Recipes
6:07 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

This Football Season, Grab Some PB&J And Spread Your Wings

Sunny Anderson came up with the recipe when trying to find new flavor combinations for chicken wings.
John Lee

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

The regular NFL season has officially started, which — for many viewers — means hours of excitement (and angst) fueled by chips and dip, sliders, nachos and, of course, chicken wings.

Sunny Anderson, a personality on the Food Network and author of Sunny's Kitchen: Easy Food For Real Life, is a big fan of wings.

"Wings are great because they're primal. First of all, you're eating with your fingers; you're gnawing meat off the bone, you know what I mean, and there's a good meat-to-skin ratio," she says.

Read more
Education
6:07 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

School Districts Struggle To Get Principals To Stay Put

Lila Hillman is starting her first year as principal at Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts in Wisconsin. Nearly one-fifth of the city's public schools have new principals this year.
Erin Toner WUWM

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 12:06 pm

At Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts on the south side of Milwaukee, kids are back in class and getting their bearings in the sprawling building. So is Lila Hillman, the school's brand-new principal. She has to figure out where everything is, who everyone is, how to run a school — and how to answer everyone's questions.

As Hillman walks through the halls, one teacher wants to know where to hang a cutout of a tree trunk. A few steps later, a janitor asks why all the lights went out in the school the night before.

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:50 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Smartwatch Is Next Step In 'Quantified Self' Life-Logging

Samsung's new Galaxy Gear smartwatch marks a new generation of wearable devices.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

You could call it the phantom menace. Each year, in the midst of winter, a rumor surfaces about a new Apple product that sets tech bloggers buzzing.

Read more
Law
4:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Basic Internet Economics At Stake In Net Neutrality Suit

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Time now for All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

Read more
Europe
4:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Loser In Moscow Mayoral Election The One That's Made News

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Read more
Europe
4:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Skateboarders Mobilize As Art Center Tries To Reclaim Cavern

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In medieval times, the south bank of the River Thames in London was full of seedy theaters, brothels and scoundrels. But centuries later, it has become one of the world's finest centers for the arts. Recent plans to expand the arts center has revealed a uniquely, contemporary conflict. As NPR's Philip Reeves reports, this conflict is reviving grassroots activism in Britain's capital.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more
Planet Money
3:23 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

The Most (And Least) Lucrative College Majors, In 1 Graph

Matt Stiles NPR

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 1:59 am

Erin Ford graduated from the University of Texas two years ago with a bachelor's degree in petroleum engineering. Recruiters came to campus to woo her. She got a paid summer internship, which turned into a full-time job after she graduated. Now, at age 24, she makes $110,000 a year.

Michael Gardner just graduated from City College in New York with a degree in psychology. He applied for more than 100 jobs, had trouble getting interviews and worked at Home Depot to make ends meet.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:41 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

For Novelist Jonathan Lethem, Radicalism Runs In The Family

Jonathan Lethem's other books include The Ecstasy of Influence, Chronic City and Girl in Landscape.
John Lucas Courtesy Doubleday

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 3:01 pm

People who don't believe in God but have an almost religious belief in causes are at the center of Jonathan Lethem's new novel, Dissident Gardens. The novel opens in 1955 Queens, N.Y., when Rose Zimmer, a secular Jew and Communist, is expelled from the party, ostensibly because the local committee disapproves of her affair with a black police officer.

Read more
12:46 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Kalamazoo company says drug shows potential for treating Alzheimer's Disease

Lead in text: 
Results of clinical trial being presented Monday in New jersey
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - A drug developed to treat diabetes also shows potential for treating Alzheimer's disease, a Kalamazoo company announced Monday, Sept. 9. Metabolic Solutions Development Co. tested the insulin sensitizer on Alzheimer's patients and found it maintained glucose metabolism in key regions of the brain affected by cognitive decline.
12:31 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Calhoun County Sheriff to begin providing road patrols in Springfield at end of the month

Lead in text: 
Springfield chose to contract out road patrols to cut costs
The beginning of contracted police services for Springfield is expected to begin at the end of the month. Springfield Mayor Sue Anderson and Sheriff Matt Saxton said last week that review of a proposed contract has taken longer than expected but should be complete soon.
Music Reviews
12:20 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

When Duke Flirted With The Queen

Duke Ellington, looking dapper in 1958.
Evening Standard Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 9:35 am

In 1958, at an arts festival in Yorkshire, Duke Ellington was presented to Queen Elizabeth II. They tied up the reception line for a few minutes, exchanging royal pleasantries; our Duke politely flirted with Her Majesty. Soon afterward, maybe that very night, Ellington outlined the movements of The Queen's Suite. He recorded it with his orchestra the following year, sent it to Her Majesty, and declined to release it to the public in his lifetime. It's not clear whether Queen Elizabeth has listened to it.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Blitz The Ambassador: Fighting Against Invisibility

Quazi King Blitz the Ambassador

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:06 pm

Read more
Sports
11:54 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Monday Night Marked By Redskins Name Debate

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:19 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a few minutes today talking about the power of words and labels. In a few minutes, we'll meet a person whose irritation with too many of the images he was seeing about Asian-Americans sparked what's become one of the most influential blogs about Asian-Americans. We're talking with the creator of the Angry Asian Man, Phil Yu.

Read more
Around the Nation
11:54 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Angry Asian Man Not So Angry

When Phil Yu started the blog 'Angry Asian Man' in 2001, he didn't think too many people who weren't friends or family would read it.
Joanna Lee

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 10:43 am

'Angry' is the nicest and often funniest possible way of introducing Phil Yu. He is the founder of the blog 'Angry Asian Man.' When Yu started the blog back in 2001, he didn't think too many people outside his friends and family would bother reading it. Now it's become a primary source for news and commentary about the Asian-American experience. And it is even required reading for some college courses.

Read more
7:36 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Power outages Monday morning in Southwest Michigan

Lead in text: 
Outages in Allegan, Van Buren Counties
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Monday is getting off to a dark start in 83 Kalamazoo-area households, Consumers Energy reports. According to the utility company's online outage maps, homes on 22nd Street north of M-43 lost power around 4:40 a.m.; crews are assigned to the area and power should be restored by 7:20 a.m.
Shots - Health News
7:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Humanitarian Aid Agencies Brace For Fallout From Syrian Strikes

At the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, many families struggle to get clean water, food and health services.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:04 am

The World Health Organization says the Syrian civil war is currently the worst ongoing humanitarian crisis on earth.

Aid groups have been scrambling to provide shelter, food, water and health care to the huge numbers of people who've been uprooted by the fighting. The big question now is whether U.S. military action could spark another wave of refugees and make the situation worse.

Read more
7:20 am
Mon September 9, 2013

African-American leaders hope racial profiling study leads to change in Kalamazoo

Lead in text: 
Yearlong study shows black drivers in Kalamazoo more than twice as likely to be pulled over than white drivers
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Mattie Jordan-Woods said she can remember feeling she was racially profiled in three separate instances about a decade ago while driving in her neighborhood.
Europe
7:01 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Tourists Flock To Downton, England

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:51 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Sailor Proposes To Girlfriend Among Flash Mob Dancers

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to Michael Turner. He's a sailor on a guided missile destroyer. He wanted to propose to Jamie Story before he was deployed, so he invited her to dinner in Virginia Beach. And according to the Virginian-Pilot, that's when the flash mob appeared. Mr. Turner arranged for 50 dancers to do synchronized steps on the street as he proposed. Luckily, she said yes, 'cause otherwise it would have been awkward.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Baseball in Kalamazoo
6:41 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Minor League team officials say Kalamazoo has "everything you'd want" for baseball

Battle Creek Bombers - file photo
Credit Battle Creek Bombers

Interview with Brian Calopy and John Bollinger

    

Minor League baseball is returning to Kalamazoo next summer. 

Read more
Politics
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Rep. Cole Weighs In On Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Seeking to win support in Congress for air strikes on Syria, President Obama addresses the nation tomorrow and also gives a series of TV interviews today. Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is also going to America's airwaves. Asked on CBS if a strike on his country could provoke a retaliation involving chemical weapons, this was his response.

Read more
Politics
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Congress Returns Facing Work Besides Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, when Representative Cole and his colleagues return to Capitol Hill today, they will hear about Syria from administration officials.

NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

Read more
Asia
5:02 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Concert Stirs Strife In Disputed Kashmir Region

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The New York City Opera may be forced to cancel the rest of its current season and all of its next season, if it is not able to raise $20 million by the end of the year. It has been known as the People's Opera since it debuted 70 years ago. Its mission: Making opera more accessible and affordable. City Opera, as it's called, has experienced what it calls a cash crisis for some years. And now, it's started a Kickstarter campaign to raise the money it needs to survive.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
3:31 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Trail Life USA, The 'Other' Boy Scouts Of America

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:49 pm

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:30 am
Mon September 9, 2013

It's OK To Protest In China, Just Don't March

Security guards stand outside newspaper offices in Guangdong province in January, where banners and flowers were laid in protest of censorship.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:12 pm

Thousands of messages posted on the Internet every day in China get censored. Until now, little has been known about how the Chinese censorship machine works — except that it is comprehensive.

"It probably is the largest effort ever to selectively censor human expression," says Harvard University social scientist Gary King. "They don't censor everything. There are millions of Chinese [who] talk about millions of things. But the effort to prune the Internet of certain kinds of information is unprecedented."

Read more
Parallels
3:29 am
Mon September 9, 2013

How To Build An Afghan Army, In A Million Difficult Steps

Afghan soldiers and contractors are taught about the workings of a diesel-powered electrical generator at Forward Operating Base Nolay in Helmand province.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:57 pm

It's 8 a.m. on a recent day at Forward Operating Base Nolay, a small Marine outpost in Taliban-infested Sangin District of southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. The Marines are in the process of caffeinating and preparing for the day.

Suddenly, explosions and gunfire ring out. The Marines don't run for their weapons or bunkers for that matter. They don't even flinch.

"We can sit here and we can have a cup of coffee when there's booms going on, we're not concerned about it," says Lt. Col. Jonathan Loney.

Read more
8:55 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

Forecast shows promise for office furniture industry

Lead in text: 
New outlook has lower expectations for 2014
An updated office furniture industry outlook shows business picking up. The quarterly outlook from the Business and Institutional Manufacturers Association in Grand Rapids now projects North American shipments to grow 4.1 percent in 2013 to $9.6 billion. That's an upgrade from the previous quarterly outlook issued in June that forecast shipment growth of 2.1 percent for the year.
Read More: http://mibiz.com
The U.S. Response To Syria
6:27 pm
Sun September 8, 2013

How Could A Drought Spark A Civil War?

Farmers ride in their tractor in the drought-hit region of Hasaka in northeastern Syria on June 17, 2010.
Louai Beshara AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 6:32 pm

The background of the Syrian conflict can seem obscure to outsiders, but the spark that started it all is often traced back to the city of Dara'a, in February of 2011.

A group of young people writing Arab Spring protest slogans on a wall are arrested and beaten.

"When that news broke there was a massive demonstration on the street, and that was the first spark one can call of the Syrian uprising," Nayan Chanda tells NPR's Jacki Lyden.

But long before a single shot was fired in Syria, there was drought in Dara'a, laying the groundwork for social unrest.

Read more

Pages