Business
5:08 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Data Marketing Critics Check Out What's Written About Them

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Companies that collect and sell information about you are usually pretty secretive about what they have on you. But one of the biggest data brokers is now letting consumers have a peek.

Yesterday, the Acxiom Corp. set up a website where people can look themselves up. It's called AboutTheData.com. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, some of the first people to try it were the data industry's critics.

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Politics
5:08 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Lawmakers Struggle With Wording Of Syria Resolution

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:58 am

Congress is trying to fashion language that would restrict U.S. involvement in Syria from escalating. But lawmakers often find it uncomfortable to rein in the commander in chief once U.S. forces have been committed.

NPR Story
4:48 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Calif. Gov. Debates Changing Who's Eligible For Jury Duty

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:58 am

The California legislature passed a bill that would allow lawful permanent residents to sit on juries. Governor Jerry Brown has until Oct. 13 to sign the bill into law. If he does, California will be the first state to allow non-citizens to perform jury duty.

NPR Story
4:48 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Is Operation Streamline Worth Its Budget Being Tripled?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:58 am

The Senate immigration bill calls for tripling a controversial federal court program called Operation Streamline. The program takes people caught crossing the border illegally, gives them prison sentences, then deports them. It's hugely expensive — but does it work?

NPR Story
4:48 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Sen. Tom Udall On Syrian Resolution

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:58 am

On Wednesday, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee passed a resolution authorizing President Obama to take military action against the Syrian regime. It goes to the full Senate over the objections of New Mexico Democrat Tom Udall. Steve Inskeep talks with Sen. Udall about his concerns over intervention in Syria.

Author Interviews
3:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

'Winter's Bone' Author Revisits A Tragedy In His Ozarks Hometown

Daniel Woodrell's novel Winter's Bone -- a dark family saga set in the Ozarks — was adapted into a film in 2010. Woodrell returned to his hometown of West Plains, Mo., about 20 years ago and has been writing there ever since.
Alexander Klein AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:42 pm

The Ozarks mountain town of West Plains, Mo., is the kind of town where a person can stand in his front yard and have a comfortable view of his past.

"My mom was actually born about 150 or 200 feet that way, and my grandfather's house is I guess 200 yards that way," says Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter's Bone, and most recently, The Maid's Version.

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Around the Nation
3:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

Goldkamp also keeps an index card file of choice words to integrate into his poem when he has trouble finding the right words.
Erin Williams STL Public Radio

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 8:10 pm

Typically, 21st century writers fall into two technical categories: Mac or PC. But poet Henry Goldkamp would much rather use a typewriter. He's the sole owner of a mobile poetry business, and for the past three years, he's spent his weekends traveling St. Louis, banging out short poems, on the spot, for anyone who stops by his table.

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Around the Nation
3:23 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Under Dust And Rust, 'New' Classic Cars Go Up For Auction

Chevrolets are lined up in a field near the Lambrecht Chevrolet dealership in Pierce, Neb. Later this month, bidders will attend a two-day auction that will feature about 500 old cars and trucks, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 8:11 pm

Inside the Lambrecht Chevrolet Company in tiny Pierce, Neb., under layers of dirt, sit a dozen classic cars. A 1978 Chevrolet Indy Pace Car, black with racing stripes down the side. There's a '66 Bel Air sedan in a color called tropic turquoise, and a 1964 impala.

"If you wipe away the dirt, it's shiny underneath," says auctioneer Yvette VanDerBrink. Even though this car is almost 50 years old, VanDerBrink says, it's still brand new.

Later this month Lambrecht's will auction more than 500 classic cars, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.

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10:08 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Advocates of cleaning up Allied Paper Landfill still waiting for EPA report

Lead in text: 
"Clean Up Not Cover Up" campaign held event Wednesday night
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - More than 70 people packed into Bell's Eccentric Cafe Thursday to hear an update on the Allied Paper site cleanup effort. Bruce Merchant, the former public works director for the city of Kalamazoo, who has continued to advocate on behalf of the city for cleanup of the Allied Paper landfill, told the crowd there wasn't much new information to report, but the campaign needs to keep its momentum during this waiting period.
8:42 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

More than $100,000 raised in effort to keep Douglas Community Association open

Lead in text: 
Non-profit hopes to replace funding pulled by United Way of the Battle Creek and Kalamazoo region
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- More than $100,000 has been raised for the Douglass Community Association, enough for three and a half months of operating expenses, it was announced Wednesday. At a press conference, the Douglass received a check for $101,469.38, through the 30-day "Saving a Legacy" fundraising campaign.
Shots - Health News
5:49 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Multitasking After 60: Video Game Boosts Focus, Mental Agility

Strenuous mental exercise like reading difficult books, solving tricky math problems — or, maybe, playing the right video game — can help keep a healthy brain sharp, research suggests.
Images.com/Corbis

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

A brain that trains can stay in the fast lane. That's the message of a study showing that playing a brain training video game for a month can rejuvenate the multitasking abilities of people in their 60s, 70s and 80s.

"After training, they improved their multitasking beyond the level of 20-year-olds," says Adam Gazzaley, one of the study's authors and a brain scientist at the University of California, San Francisco.

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Music Interviews
5:27 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Trent Reznor: 'I'm Not The Same Person I Was 20 Years Ago'

Trent Reznor.
Baldur Bragason Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 2:55 pm

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Food
5:27 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Fixing Stove Hoods To Keep Pollution Out Of The Kitchen

Cooking on gas and electric stoves can create indoor air pollution. The best way to avoid it is to buy a good range hood that vents outside, experts say.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:47 pm

Hot summer days often mean air pollution warnings in big cities. But the air inside your kitchen can sometimes be just as harmful. Cooking fumes from your stove are supposed to be captured by a hood over the range — but even some expensive models aren't that effective.

Jennifer Logue spends a lot of time thinking about what happens when she cooks. She's a research scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, where she studies indoor air pollution.

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Ben Philpott hosts Agenda Texas for KUT-FM. He has been covering state politics and dozens of other topics for the station since 2002. He's been recognized for outstanding radio journalism by the Radio and Television News Directors Association, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters and twice by the Houston Press Club as Radio Journalist of the Year. Before moving to Texas, he worked in public radio in Birmingham and Tuscaloosa, Ala., and at several television stations in Alabama and Tennessee. Born in New York City and raised in Chattanooga, Tenn., Philpott graduated from the University of Alabama with a degree in broadcast journalism.

Around the Nation
4:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Ohio Kidnapper Ariel Castro Commits Suicide In Prison

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Just months after Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight escaped from years of captivity in a house in Cleveland, their captor is dead. Ariel Castro was found hanging in his prison cell last night. His death has now been ruled a suicide. From member station WCPN, Nick Castele reports.

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Around the Nation
4:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Miss., Texas Won't Offer VA Benefits To Same-Sex Partners

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

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Energy
4:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Native Americans Camp Out To Protest Wis. Mining Project

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 5:27 pm

A dispute over a proposed iron ore mine in Wisconsin has spilled into the nearby woods. Native Americans have set up a camp to protect land near the mine site and say federal treaty rights allow the campers to stay.

3:20 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Emergency plans for schools, day cares not mandatory in Michigan

Lead in text: 
Save the Children, a non-government disaster relief organization says schools in Michigan, Iowa, Idaho, and Kansas do not legally have to make emergency plans for natural disasters or school shootings
More than half of the states and the District of Columbia do not require schools or day care centers to meet minimum standards to protect children during major emergencies, according to a new report. Save the Children, a non-governmental disaster relief organization focused on children, found that 17 states don't require evacuation plans in day care centers.
3:04 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Bill would outlaw gas chambers in animal shelters

Lead in text: 
Republican Senator Rick Jones says gas chambers can take up to 20 minutes to euthanize a cat or dog and is more painful for the animal than lethal injection.
LANSING, MI -- A bill working its way through the Michigan Senate would ban the use of gas chambers to euthanize cats or dogs. Sponsoring state Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, said that animal control shelters in some Michigan counties use gas when it is necessary to euthanize a dog or cat despite the availability of lethal injection.
Planet Money
2:07 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

The Nobel Laureate Who Figured Out How To Deal With Annoying People

"I've been wrong so often I don't find it extraordinary at all," Ronald Coase told us last year.
University of Chicago

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

Update, Sept. 4: We added the audio for David Kestenbaum's radio obituary of Ronald Coase.

If you created the world as a simple economic thought experiment, companies wouldn't exist. Instead, everybody would work for themselves, and they'd be constantly selling their labor (or the fruits of their labor, or use of their tools, or whatever) to the highest bidder. Wages would rise and fall every day (every hour! every second!) depending on supply and demand. That's how the market works, after all.

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Music News
1:57 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Everybody Loves John Fogerty

Wrote a Song for Everyone." href="/post/everybody-loves-john-fogerty" class="noexit lightbox">
John Fogerty teams up with Brad Paisley, whom he calls one of the greatest guitarists alive, in "Hot Rod Heart" on his new album, Wrote a Song for Everyone.
Benjamin Enos Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

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U.S.
1:30 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Program Fights Gun Violence Bravado With 'Story Of Suffering'

Dr. Amy Goldberg explains the medical treatment Adams received after he was shot. Part of her demonstration involves placing stickers on a student volunteer to mark bullet entry and exit points.
Courtesy Jessica Kourkounis

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 5:06 pm

In 2004, 16-year-old Lamont Adams was shot more than a dozen times near his home in North Philadelphia. He was taken to Philadelphia's Temple University Hospital, where trauma unit head Dr. Amy Goldberg fought to save his life. Goldberg lost that battle and Lamont died shortly after arriving at the hospital, but after treating so many gun injuries and watching so many victims die, Goldberg decided to make a change.

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Book Reviews
1:30 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

From McDermott, An Extraordinary Story Of An Ordinary 'Someone'

The main character of Alice McDermott's Someone grew up in 1920s and '30s New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:27 pm

Endurance, going the distance, sucking up the solitude and the brine: I'm not talking about the glorious Diana Nyad and her instantly historic swim from Cuba to Key West, but of the ordinary heroine whose life is the subject of Alice McDermott's latest novel, Someone. "Ordinary" is a word that's used a lot to describe McDermott's characters, mostly Irish and working class, mostly un-heroic in any splashy way.

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Parallels
1:14 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

'We Are Next': Greek Jews Fear Rise Of Far-Right Party

Mois Yussuroum, a 94-year-old retired dentist, fought the Nazis as part of the Greek resistance during World War II. "Of the 650 Greek Jews who fought in the resistance, I'm the only one still alive," he says.
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

No one has ever doubted Mois Yussuroum's patriotism. As part of the Greek resistance during World War II, he fought Benito Mussolini's fascist army and then the Nazis.

"The other resistance fighters didn't know I was Jewish," he says, since he used the name "Yiorgos Gazis" in case he was captured. "But my superiors did know, and they gave me many responsibilities, including making me a garrison commander."

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12:13 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Marshall approves district for hospital expansion

Lead in text: 
Compromise was reached after dispute between Oaklawn Hospital and Marshall Neighborhood Association
MARSHALL - After months of refining an ordinance that would allow for future expansion of Oaklawn Hospital, the Marshall City Council on Monday evening approved the Hospital Campus Overlay District. Discussion on the ordinance was brief, but council members praised the effort and collaboration of the parties involved in the three-year discussion -- city staff, Oaklawn Hospital and members of the Marshall Neighborhood Association.
Politics
11:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

What Does America Think Of President Obama's 'Red Line?'

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:58 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good amount of time today hearing various points of view about how the U.S. and the international community should respond to events in Syria. Later, when we head into the Beauty Shop, we'll ask our panel of women journalists and commentators for their thoughts. And we also want to ask them about a list published by a business magazine of the smartest women on Twitter that was notably lacking in diversity. That's in just a few minutes.

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NPR Story
11:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Who Are The Smartest People On Twitter?

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, Sheila Bridges stood out for many reasons in her chosen field of interior design. Her celebrity client list, being African-American, but then she began to stand out in a way she did not want - she started losing her hair. We'll talk about how that changed her life and her focus. She talks about that in her new memoir "The Bald Mermaid." And we'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

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Music
11:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Emeli Sande: 'It's Always The Lyric That Gets Me'

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:58 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Not that hair is the only thing we care about, but now we're going to hear from a singer whose signature blonde platinum coif is one of the things that makes her stand out. We're talking about singer-songwriter Emeli Sande. She had the best-selling album in Britain in 2012.

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Recording session for WMUK's program "WestSouthwest"
Credit WMUK
11:20 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Michigan Congressman Kerry Bentivolio will face primary challenge

Lead in text: 
Former state lawmakers Mike Bishop and Andrew "Rocky" Roczkowski are among supporters of challenger David Trott
WASHINGTON - Lawyer David Trott will enter the Republican primary next year to challenge freshman U.S. Rep. Kerry Bentivolio (R-Milford), a former reindeer rancher who took the nomination in 2012 despite a lack of mainstream support.

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