1:16 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Snyder wants more Chinese tourism in Michigan

Lead in text: 
Last year, Chinese tourists spent more than $100 billion in the U.S., 37 percent more than in 2011.
LANSING - The Chinese spend more on international tourism than any other country, and Michigan hopes to cash in on their growing appetite for travel. Tourism is a key focus of Gov. Rick Snyder's upcoming trade mission to Asia.
Music Interviews
11:03 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Jason Isbell Locates His Musical Compass On 'Southeastern'

Jason Isbell was previously a member of Drive-By Truckers. His solo albums include Sirens of the Ditch and Here We Rest.
Eric England Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 2:26 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on July 17, 2013.

When singer-songwriter Jason Isbell used to get drunk, he'd sometimes tell his then-girlfriend, the musician Amanda Shires, that he needed to quit the bottle — and that if it was going to take, he'd have to go to rehab. Eventually, she said the next time he told her that, she'd hold him to it. And she did. And he went. And, he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "The jury is still out on whether or not it worked, but it worked today and all the days leading up to this."

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Around the Nation
6:56 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Long Island Man Legally Changes His Name To Santa Claus

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Long Island man legally changed his name to Santa Claus. Whatever benefits he may get from that, it did not free him from jury duty. Santa Claus was summoned to court. Santa Claus was put on a jury panel. For this defendant, a jury of his peers included the man who showed up wearing a red dress shirt with a picture of Santa Claus and eight reindeer. Santa could have been among those deciding the trial except the case was dismissed. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:50 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Wild Stork Picked Up For Spying In Egypt

A fisherman saw the bird along the Nile River with a suspicious electronic device fixed to its wing. The fisherman made a citizen's arrest. Concerned officials found it was not a spying device, just a wildlife tracker.

Race
4:53 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Paris Has Been A Haven For African Americans Escaping Racism

The City Of Lights became known as a beacon of freedom and tolerance for African Americans. Paris is rich in black history — especially from black Americans who have flocked there since the 19th century.

Around the Nation
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

In Maine, Even With A GPS, You Can't Get There From Here

If you're planning that last summer road trip, you might want to pull those maps out of the attic.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 10:58 am

Once a standard fixture at every gas station, good old fashioned paper maps have all but folded in the digital age. But, there are places that can baffle your high tech gadgets.

Getting yourself lost in a rural state is an easy thing to do. Pavement turns into dirt track, and before you know it, you're driving through miles of woods and boulders, and your GPS isn't helping.

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Remembrances
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

British Journalist Sir David Frost Dies At 74

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. We're saying good-bye, this morning, to the man who conducted one of the most famous television interviews in history.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

DAVID FROST: So what in a sense you're saying, is that there are certain situations where the president can decide that it's in the best interests of the nation or something and do something illegal?

PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON: Well, when the President does it that means it's not illegal.

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Politics
3:31 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Syria Resolution Could Be A Hard Sell On Capitol Hill

From left, Rep. Sander Levin, D-Mich., Rep. Robert Scott, D-Va., and Rep. Brad Schneider, D- ll., walk to a closed members-only briefing on Syria on Sunday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 6:41 pm

Twenty-four hours after President Obama announced on Saturday that he'll wait for congressional authorization before launching strikes on Syria; members of Congress attended a classified briefing at the Capitol.

For days, most of the discontent among members of Congress has been about not being included in the deliberations on Syria, about not getting the chance to vote. Now that they've gotten their way, each member of Congress will have to go on the record.

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Crime In The City
3:26 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Hardcore With A Heart: Joburg Thrillers Star A Spunky P.I.

Jassy Mackenzie was born in Rhodesia and moved to South Africa when she was eight years old. She edits and writes for the annual publication Best of South Africa.
Soho Crime

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:45 am

South Africa's commercial capital, Johannesburg, is a mixture of the old Wild West and a complex, modern African hub — at least, that's how crime novelist Jassy Mackenzie describes it. Mackenzie was born across the border, in Zimbabwe, but she moved to Johannesburg — Joburg for short — as a child, and she's a passionate champion of the city.

"I love the energy of Johannesburg," Mackenzie says. "People are open. People communicate. People are friendly in a brash, big-city way, which I love. ... [it's] the New York of South Africa!"

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Shots - Health News
3:24 am
Mon September 2, 2013

To Keep Polio At Bay, Israel Revaccinates A Million Kids

In early August, Israel launched a mass campaign to vaccinate children against polio, including this little girl at a clinic in Rahat.
David Buimovitch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 10:10 am

Israel is in the midst of a massive, emergency immunization drive of all children under the age of 9 against polio.

Why?

Health workers detected the virus in southern Israel in February. Since then, they've found it in 85 different sewage samples across the country, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative said Wednesday. Yet so far, no children have gotten sick or been paralyzed by the virus.

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Business
3:20 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Trucker Shortage Worsens As Energy Sector Booms

Keith Ceynar transfers oil from his truck into a tank at a facility outside Alexander, N.D. An increasing amount of oil is being delivered by trucks.
Matthew Staver Landov

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:45 am

When goods arrive in Houston, they may come in containers stacked high on huge ships or strung out on long lines of rail cars. But to get to the customer, those goods need to be put on trucks and driven to their final destinations.

And now with the oil and gas sectors booming, the demand for truckers is soaring. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says oil delivered to refineries by trucks shot up 38 percent between 2011 and 2012.

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Food
3:19 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Pomegranate Molasses Could Be Your Secret Weapon

Chop suey veggies, garbanzo bean flour and the rose water
Katharyn Head Cook Your Cupboard

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 11:36 am

This is an installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, an ongoing food series about working with what you have on hand. Have a food that has you stumped? Share a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites. The current submission category is: Freezer Finds!

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History
6:18 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Declassified Documents Reveal CIA Role In 1953 Iranian Coup

Former Iranian Premier Mohammed Mossadegh appears in October 1951. The CIA's overthrow of Mossadegh was a template for the agency's covert operations going forward.
AP

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 6:44 pm

The Central Intelligence Agency was behind the overthrow of Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh in 1953. It's been an open secret for decades, but last week, The George Washington University's National Security Archive released newly declassified documents proving it.

Orchestrating the Iranian coup d'état was a first for the CIA and would serve as the template for future Cold War covert operations worldwide.

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Business
5:41 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

When Stress Takes Over, Employee Burnout Can Set In

Pushing workers only goes so far, says one long-time human resources manager.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 7:16 pm

As Labor Day honors American workers, stress weighs on many. A changing world — and therefore a changing workplace — has many employees on the job and staring at screens for hours upon hours. Some have reached a breaking point.

John Challenger, CEO of workplace consulting company Challenger, Gray & Christmas, diagnoses burnout. He tells NPR's Jacki Lyden stress can manifest emotionally, mentally or physically. "It can be combined with doubts about your confidence or the value of the work you do," he says.

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Television
5:04 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

'Cold Justice' Is Coming To A Small Town (And TV) Near You

In her 21 years as a prosecutor, Kelly Siegler successfully tried 68 murder cases.
John Nowak

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 6:18 pm

Television has served up sass and brass with its female crime solvers for decades: Angie Dickenson in Police Woman, in the 1970s, Cagney and Lacey in the 80s, and the modern duo Rizzoli and Isles on TNT.

This fall, that network has decided to forget the script. It has two more sleuths who've already cracked thousands of real crime scenes and racked up dozens of victories in court.

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Music Interviews
5:04 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Kathleen Hanna On Working Through Illness And Focusing Anger

Kathleen Hanna (center) is the frontwoman of The Julie Ruin. The band's debut album is titled Run Fast.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 6:18 pm

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Religion
5:04 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Cowboy Church: With Rodeo Arena, They 'Do Church Different'

A Western motif greets visitors to the Cowboy Church of Ellis County, in Waxahachie, Texas. About 1,700 people attend the church on Sundays.
Matt Slocum AP

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 8:36 pm

It's Sunday morning at the Cowboy Church of Santa Fe County, N.M. You know you're there because of the chuck wagon parked by the highway.

You couldn't find a more nonreligious-looking building. The church is a charmless metal warehouse on a concrete slab. Inside, the altar is decorated like a set from a 1950s western — complete with saddles, hats, boots, a lasso and wagon wheel.

The band has just kicked off with "I Think God Must Be a Cowboy at Heart," and about 30 people in folding chairs are tapping their feet.

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Jerome Moross Special

This two-hour special celebrates the colorful life of American composer Jerome Moross.  Moross is known for film scores like The Big Country but he also wrote for Broadway and the concert stage.  We'll hear from members of his family and admirers from Wynton Marsalis to Jerry Stiller.

Education
5:21 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

What Makes The 'Smartest Kids In The World'?

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 10:06 am

Transcript

JACKIE LYDEN, HOST:

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Strange News
5:21 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

Welcome To 'Night Vale' — Watch Out For The Tarantulas

Welcome to Night Vale is the number one most downloaded podcast on iTunes.
Jeffrey Cranor & Joseph Fink

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 10:06 am

Jeffrey Cranor and Joseph Fink have the news of the weird covered: they're the creative masterminds behind the popular sci-fi podcast Welcome to Night Vale. Though only a year old, the spooky Night Vale — which channels David Lynch, Orson Welles and H.P. Lovecraft in its descriptions of a small, weird desert town — has rocketed up the iTunes ratings list to claim the number one most downloaded spot.

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Author Interviews
5:21 pm
Sat August 31, 2013

Shacochis Spans Generations In 'The Woman Who Lost Her Soul'

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 10:06 am

As a journalist and essayist, Bob Shacochis has covered conflict in the Balkans and Haiti, the abuse of American power overseas, spycraft, and the sexual politics that divide men and women. He is also a novelist and the winner of a National Book Award. His new novel, The Woman Who Lost Her Soul, was a long time coming, but critics are saying it was well worth the wait.

The Woman Who Lost Her Soul is a 700-page work that spans continents and generations. It's been compared to the work of Joseph Conrad, Graham Greene and Norman Mailer.

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Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: 'America's Test Kitchen,' 'Short Term 12' And Demian Bichir

Jack Bishop of America's Test Kitchen says the trick to grilling peaches is using fruit that's ripe but firm.
mccun934 via Flickr

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 12:20 pm

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

'America's Test Kitchen' On Grilling Peaches, Tofu And Burgers: Bridget Lancaster and Jack Bishop advise using ripe fruit, extra-firm tofu and poking your hamburgers so they don't puff up like tennis balls.

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sat August 31, 2013

If 'Humanitarian,' Why Not Intervene In Syria Sooner?

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

As U.S. forced reportedly prepare to launch a limited military action against the Syrian government, we turn now to a voice who's long made the case that the U.S. must take some action in Syria. Michael Ignatieff is a leading voice for the idea of humanitarian intervention. He helped develop the concept of the responsibility to protect. He is the former leader of Canada's Liberal party and now back on the faculty of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School.

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Contenders Battle In The U.S. Open

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon and nice to say time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: The U.S. Open full swing. We've seen a curtain call for James Blake, an early exit by Venus Williams, a glitter of greatness from Victoria Duval and Serena Williams star burning bright as ever. For the latest from Blushing Meadows we turn to Howard Bryant of ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine. He joins us from his studios of the Radio Foundation in New York City. Howard, thanks for being with us.

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NPR Story
7:38 am
Sat August 31, 2013

NBC To Broadcast Britsh Soccer League

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There's no joke in American sport circles. Soccer is the sport of the future and always will be. Is the future here? Big time soccer finally has a major American television contract, but it's not the L.A. Galaxy, Chicago Fire, San Jose Earthquake, or Columbus Crew. The NBC sports network has started broadcasting a full schedule - should that be schedule - from Britain's premier league. That's Manchester United Arsenal, Chelsea, Liverpool, the Tottenham Hotspur and West Ham.

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Music Interviews
4:56 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Typhoon: Songs For A Lost Childhood

Typhoon, the Portland, Ore. band led by Kyle Morton, features a dozen musicians playing precise and complicated arrangements.
Jaclyn Campanaro Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:59 am

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All Tech Considered
4:56 am
Sat August 31, 2013

Call Me, Haiti? One Man's Quest To Skype Around The World

YouTube

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:59 am

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:08 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:56 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:08 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:56 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, on to our final game, Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as they can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Carl, can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL: Tom Bodett and Charlie Pierce are tied for first, Peter, with three points each. Amy Dickinson has two.

SAGAL: All right. So Amy...

AMY DICKINSON: Yes.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:08 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 11:56 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the next new word we learn? Charlie Pierce.

CHARLIE PIERCE: Hackstacking, the process of booking the Sunday News Panel Shows.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Amy Dickinson.

AMY DICKINSON: Twerkmenistan, the country assigned to receive Miley Cyrus after her 15 minutes of fame has passed.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Tom Bodett.

TOM BODETT: My pain has a name and it is spasgasm, the debilitating back cramp middle-aged people experience after twerking.

(LAUGHTER)

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