Book Reviews
3:37 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

An Alternate Universe Delights In Complex, Perplexing 'Duplex'

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:04 pm

You're walking your dog in a suburb that may or may not exist in this dimension. The dog whines. You ignore him. Anyway, you're too busy looking out for that sexy, evil sorcerer. Suddenly, a gray rabbit appears, and you realize: the world is ending.

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2:11 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

First day of school goes smoothly in Marshall as high school merger with Albion becomes reality

Lead in text: 
Marshall High School principal says school is "bigger" but otherwise not changed
MARSHALL - Worries about merging two vastly different schools gave way to fears about finding the right classroom on time as Albion high schoolers headed to Marshall High School for the first day of the academic year on Tuesday. Buses from Albion arrived at Marshall High at about 7:20 a.m.
2:00 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Michigan Medicaid expansion won't take effect until spring

Lead in text: 
Senate approved bill last week, but without enough votes for "immediate effect"
LANSING, MI -- The Michigan Senate on Tuesday failed to reconsider Gov. Rick Snyder's preferred timeline for implementation of Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as "Obamacare." The decision could cost Michigan up to $7 million a day in federal funding that will be available beginning January 1, Department of Community Health Director Jim Haveman said last week.
All Tech Considered
12:46 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Beyond The Shadows: Apple's iOS 7 Is All About The Screen

Craig Federighi, senior vice president of software engineering at Apple, discusses features of the new iOS 7 during the keynote address of the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference on June 10 in San Francisco.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:55 pm

At some point in the coming weeks, users of Apple iPhones and iPads will wake up to an alert that there is a new version of the company's mobile operating system, known as iOS, for them to install.

If users follow historical patterns, within a few days of the launch of iOS 7, almost all of them will install the updated software and, just like that, more than 500 million phones and tablets will be made new. Never before has a technology industry launch come close to matching the scale and speed of this switch.

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WestSouthwest
12:26 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

WestSouthwest: Walking the Great Lakes

Loreen Niewenhuis has a close encounter with a wave
Credit Loreen Niewenhuis

What’s an author to do after writing about a thousand-mile walk around Lake Michigan? If you’re Loreen Niewenhuis of Battle Creek the answer is simple: hike another thousand miles around parts of the other lakes. Niewenhuis recently published a new book about that experience called A 1,000-Mile Great Lakes Walk and it has received some national media attention.

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WestSouthwest
12:18 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

WestSouthwest: Helping Haiti's kids

ICC US National Director Keith Mumma with kids in Haiti
Credit International Child Care

The Caribbean nation of Haiti was once a port-of-call for cruise ships. These days it’s better known for poverty and disasters, both man-made and natural. But the country’s problems have roots that reach far back in its history.

In the mid-1960s a farm couple from Indiana visited Haiti during a holiday cruise and returned with a determination to help kids there. The faith-based Christian organization they founded, International Child Care, is now based in Kalamazoo.

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Around the Nation
12:05 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Diana Nyad: Dream Accomplished

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally, we want to end today's program on an inspiring note. We want to talk about Diana Nyad. The 64-year-old recently became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage. That's a distance of 110 miles. This was Nyad's fifth try at completing the swim, and you might remember we spoke with her in July 2010, just before her second try, and she told us what got her thinking about it.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVAL RECORDING)

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Technology
11:57 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Software Helps Keep Your Shopping In Check

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Continuing our conversation about personal finance, we just talked about apps like Mint and how people are using them to keep tabs on their personal finances, but Omar Green and his new software company want to take it even further to help you make good decisions about your money. And let's just say you might not need to call mom quite so often. We'll let him explain. Omar Green is the CEO and cofounder of wallet.AI and he's with us now to tell us more. Welcome, thanks so much for joining us.

OMAR GREEN: Thanks for having me.

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Law
11:57 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Are Cops Properly Trained To Deal With People With Disabilities?

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:22 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Fresh Air Interview
11:06 am
Tue September 3, 2013

At 60, 'Challenges Are Opportunities' For John Zorn

John Zorn's latest album is Dreamachines, which is inspired by Brion Gysin and William Burroughs' cut-up techniques.
Scott Irvine Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:25 pm

At 60, New York City-based composer John Zorn is wiser, sure, but no less prolific, thoughtful and antagonistic than before. His oeuvre is fantastically wide, from cutthroat jazz improvisation and pummeling noise-rock to gorgeous chamber music and, believe it or not, a genuine Christmas album.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Says Right Strikes Can Hurt Assad's Capabilities

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., met with President Obama on Sunday at the White House.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:18 pm

By "taking out Bashar Assad's delivery capabilities of chemical weapons" the U.S. can make it much harder for the Syrian leader to wage war against his people and perhaps level the fighting field or turn it in favor of Assad's opponents, Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona said Tuesday on Morning Edition.

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NPR Story
8:48 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Backs President On Syria Strikes

Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona talks to Steve Inskeep about what he would like to see the U.S. do about Syria.

Around the Nation
6:49 am
Tue September 3, 2013

U.S. Navy Wins Battle Of Lake Erie, Again

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to the U.S. Navy, which won the battle of Lake Erie - again. Sailing ships re-enacted the victory over the British 200 ago during the War of 1812. The Port Clinton News Herald says the 2013 battle turned out the same, but with better technology: people captured the battle scenes on cell phones.

In 1813, the winning commander said we have met the enemy and they are ours. Which is short enough to say on Twitter. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:43 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Woman Waits 8 Years To Get Diamond After Chicken Ate It

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. A diamond is forever, luckily, because a chicken only lasts about eight years - which is how long a woman in England is willing to wait to get back a diamond earring, after her pet chicken gulped it down while sitting on her shoulder.

The diamond earring could be removed surgically, but Claire Lennon told "The Telegraph" she worries the 6-month-old chicken wouldn't survive. And her daughter loves the bird so the diamond-wait, for the pet to die naturally.

6:41 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Berrien County school district no longer offers classes, but still in dispute with state

Lead in text: 
Case centers on student counts for Galien School District
The Galien school district's court battle with the Michigan Department of Education isn't over. The MDE has appealed a late July court ruling in Galien's favor to the Michigan Court of Appeals, said Kevin Ivers, superintendent of the Berrien County Regional Education Service Agency.
Middle East
5:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Iran Weighs Heavily In Debate Over Syria

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As we've heard, some of the debate over Syria is actually a debate about Syria's ally, Iran. We want to know what Iranian leaders are thinking as the United States contemplates involvement in Syria. And so we've called Scott Peterson, in Istanbul. He's a Christian Science Monitor reporter who's well-known for his coverage of Iran, and author of a book called "Let the Swords Encircle Me," which is about Iran.

Mr. Peterson, welcome to the program.

SCOTT PETERSON: Thank you.

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Sports
5:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Nyad Finishes Swimming Goal 35 Years After She First Tried

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The swimmer Diana Nyad has finally accomplished what no other athlete has ever done. She swam 110 miles from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage and she did it at the age of 64. As Nyad emerged from the Gulf of Mexico yesterday, he tongue swollen from swallowing sea water, she had messages for the crowd that greeted her.

DIANA NYAD: One is we should never ever give up. Two is you're never too old to chase your dreams.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Radio Station KYAY Is Lifeline For Apache Tribe

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And on a reservation in Arizona, there's a tiny radio station marking its first year on the air. KYAY is owned by the San Carlos Apache Tribe and it's become a window into this isolated reservation, offering news and entertainment. NPR's Kirk Siegler has been listening.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRADITIONAL APACHE SONG)

KIRK SIEGLER: From a cinder block building in a dusty lot on the edge of San Carlos, comes KYAY 91.1 FM, the voice of the San Carlos Apaches.

LYNN KEY: So, you know, it's KYAY.

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Environment
3:03 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Pollution, Not Rising Temperatures, May Have Melted Alpine Glaciers

The Alps' largest glacier, Aletsch Glacier, extends more than 14 miles and covers more than 46 square miles.
Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:28 am

Glaciers in the Alps of Europe pose a scientific mystery. They started melting rapidly back in the 1860s. In a span of about 50 years, some of the biggest glaciers had retreated more than half a mile.

But nobody could explain the glacier's rapid decline. Now, a new study from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory uncovers a possible clue to why the glaciers melted before temperatures started rising: Soot from the Industrial Revolution could have heated up the ice.

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Law
3:02 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Justice Department Tackles Quality Of Defense For The Poor

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in February. In a landmark decision half a century ago, the justices guaranteed a lawyer for criminal defendants who are too poor to afford one.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:37 am

All over the country, lawyers who defend poor people in criminal cases have been sharing their stories about painful budget cuts. Some federal public defenders have shut their doors to new clients after big layoffs. And in many states, the public defense system has operated in crisis for years.

But an unprecedented recent court filing from the Justice Department has cheered the typically overburdened attorneys who represent the poor and could have dramatic implications for the representation of indigent defendants.

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Books
3:01 am
Tue September 3, 2013

For F. Scott And Zelda Fitzgerald, A Dark Chapter In Asheville, N.C.

Zelda Sayre and F. Scott Fitzgerald pose for a photo at the Sayre home in Montgomery, Ala., in 1919, the year before they married.
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 3:30 pm

Asheville, a mountain town in North Carolina, is known for at least two important native sons: writers Thomas Wolfe, whose 1929 novel Look Homeward, Angel eviscerated some locals, and Charles Frazier, whose 1997 civil war novel Cold Mountain is set in the nearby hills. But there is also a little-known story of another writer — F. Scott Fitzgerald — who, along with his wife Zelda, had devastating connections to the town.

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9:32 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Michigan behind other Great Lakes states in recycling programs

Lead in text: 
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality says Michigan recycles about 20% of municipal solid waste, about 10 percentage points less than other Great Lakes states
LaDonna Woodlaw doesn't do much recycling. That's not to say she wouldn't. Woodlaw lives off Evergreen in Detroit, a section of the city that, like most, doesn't have curbside, throw-it-all-together recycling. If she remembers, she'll take a bag of recyclables when visiting her sister's house in Ecorse, which has curbside recycling, she said.
9:22 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Pension obligations for Battle Creek and Calhoun County not fully funded, but not as dire as Detroit's

Lead in text: 
Calhoun County Administrator says recovery continues from 2008 stock market crash
Employee pension plans in Battle Creek and Calhoun County, like Detroit, aren't fully funded, but officials say they're confident the two governments aren't not facing pension-funding debacle crippling the Motor City. "We have the same scenario that everyone does with the stock market," said Calhoun County Administrator Kelli Scott.
NPR Story
7:11 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Coal Industry Takes Teachers For A Class In Mining

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The coal industry is trying to buff up its image in Texas. Texas is known for oil and gas, but it's also a big coal producer. And mining companies are paying for a boot camp for science teachers that has some educators and parents upset.

Laura Isensee, of member station KUHF in Houston, has more.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS)

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History
6:41 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

50th Marshall Home Tour celebrates with 'This Old House' star, other events

The Honolulu House in Marshall, Michigan
Credit Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The Honolulu House in Marshall was built in 1860 for Supreme Court Justice Abner Pratt who became the former the U.S. Consul to the Sandwich Islands, now called Hawaii. It’s just one of more than 20 sites in the city that will be part of the 50th anniversary of the Marshall Home Tours.

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Theatre
5:58 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Tintypes: A turn-of-the-century musical revue

Credit Marshall Civic Players

If you boiled turn-of-the-century America into one show, it might look something like Tintypes. The Marshall Civic Players will put on Tintypes starting Thursday at 8 p.m. at the Franke Center for the Arts. 

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5:52 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Departing KSO Executive Director says Kalamazoo is "awesome" calls Cleveland Orchestra "dream job"

Lead in text: 
Jennifer Barlament came to KSO in 2009. She will become General Manager of Cleveland Orchestra
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Jennifer Barlament is going from the Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra to one of the "Big Five." During an interview shortly after the executive director of the KSO announced she'd accepted the general manager position at the Cleveland Orchestra, Barlament praised the community and the KSO staff for putting her in position to make such a substantial career leap.
5:44 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Several Southwest Michigan school districts running low on cash as school year starts

Lead in text: 
Many factors contribute to a lack of revenue for districts
Even as area schools predict an uptick in income and cut back spending, at least eight school districts are running dangerously low on cash, according to projected 2013-14 budgets, with at least two districts in deficit and another expecting to run entirely out of money by June 30.
The Salt
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Tlacoyos: A Mexican Grilled Snack That Tempted The Conquistadors

Tlacoyos can be filled with beans, potatoes, mushrooms or cheese and are often topped with grilled cactus, onions, cilantro, and salsa.
Jasmine Garsd for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 2:10 pm

For the last in a summer series of grilled food from around the world, we head to Mexico, where a small doughy treat is found everywhere from street corner grills to high-end restaurants. It's called a tlacoyo (pronounced tla-COY-yo) and although it may sound novel, it's an ancient food that's older than Hernan Cortes.

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NPR Story
4:50 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Verizon To Pay $130 Billion For Stake In Vodafone

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 7:11 pm

Verizon Communications is paying $130 billion to buy part of its wireless unit from the British company Vodafone. It's one of the biggest deals in the history of the telecommunications business and underscores the growing profitability of wireless. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli about the deal.

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