Around the Nation
7:07 am
Fri September 6, 2013

It Could Soon Be Drone Hunting Season

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

It may soon be drone hunting season. Deer Trail, Colorado, is considering a plan to issue hunting licenses for drones. It's a protest against federal surveillance. And even though the proposal has not passed, the Denver Post says 983 people applied. Now, you'd think the federal government would laugh off this notion that there would ever be a drone over Deer Trail. Instead, officials have warned against shooting them.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Florida's Byler Sextuplets Turn Six Years Old

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Florida's first sextuplets turn 6 this week. And the Byler kids have also started kindergarten - each in separate classrooms.

Apparently, it's been a tough transition with a lot of tears. It's the first time the five brothers and one sister have been on their own since they were born. It also made more work for their mother. She had to bake 120 cupcakes so that each of the six children would have enough for each classroom party.

6:53 am
Fri September 6, 2013

New panel hears pleas to expand medical marijuana use

Lead in text: 
Medical Marijuana Review Panel will make decision at a later date
LANSING - A new state panel heard pleas from the public Thursday to add insomnia and post traumatic stress disorder as qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use in Michigan. Twenty people took turns touting medical marijuana as an effective, less harmful treatment for the disorders than pharmaceutical medications at a hearing held by the Michigan Medical Marihuana Review Panelin downtown Lansing.
6:44 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Springfield names four finalists for city manager

Lead in text: 
Interviews are scheduled for next week
Four people, three with Michigan ties, are finalists for Springfield city manager. If chosen by the city council, one of the men will replace Frank Peterson, who resigned to become city manager in Muskegon. Peterson leaves the job Thursday. All four candidates are expected to attend a public open house at Springfield City Hall from 5:30 p.m.
National Security
5:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Secretary Napolitano Finishes Up At Homeland Security

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today is Janet Napolitano's last day as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. Napolitano is leaving Washington D.C., heading for California, to become at the end of this month, president of the University of California System. NPR's Brian Naylor sat down with Napolitano yesterday for a look back at her tenure as head of one of the government's largest and most complex departments.

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Parallels
5:05 am
Fri September 6, 2013

India's New Central Banker Steps Into A Perfect Storm

Raghuram Rajan, the new head of the Reserve Bank of India, has his work cut out for him. India's economic growth has crashed, its currency has plunged and prices are up.
Rajanish Kakade AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 8:54 pm

Raghuram Rajan, the new governor of India's central bank, swept into office this week infusing a sense of optimism.

He announced hard-headed measures Wednesday that remove uncertainty that has characterized the Reserve Bank of India's moves.

By Friday, Indian equities and the rupee were clawing back.

But analysts say the exuberance — and honeymoon with the suave MIT-trained economist — is unlikely to last.

After decadelong high growth rates, India is now the sick man of Asia.

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Sports
4:19 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Olympic Committee To Announce 2020 Summer Games Host

Tokyo's 2020 candidate city logo.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 2:22 pm

Saturday in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the International Olympic Committee will announce the host of the 2020 Summer Games. The committee is choosing from among Istanbul, Madrid and Tokyo. The contenders all have strong selling points, but each also has serious issues clouding its bid.

Violent Crackdown Hangs Over Turkey's Bid

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Business
3:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Rates Come Down On Jumbo Mortgage Loans

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 12:40 pm

There is something new and different for home mortgages: Jumbo loans are being made at lower interest rates than traditional home loans. That's kind of like a first class airplane ticket being cheaper than riding in coach.

At first this seems crazy. For as long as anybody can remember, homeowners have had to pay a premium to get jumbo loans. That's because they're not guaranteed by the federal government. If they're not guaranteed, they're riskier, so they cost more in interest payments.

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Shots - Health News
2:54 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After A Decade, Congress Moves To Fix Doctors' Medicare Pay

I think I see the problem.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 7:59 am

Hear the words health care and Congress, and you think fight, right?

And you'd be forgiven, particularly because the House has now voted some 40 times in the past two years to repeal or otherwise undo portions of the Affordable Care Act.

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StoryCorps
2:53 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Remembering A Boss Who Led A Team To Safety On Sept. 11

Connie Labetti, 52, was able to escape one of the World Trade Center buildings on Sept. 11, 2001, thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:46 pm

Connie Labetti worked on the 99th floor of the south tower — the second World Trade Center tower to be hit on Sept. 11, 2001.

She made it out of the building thanks to her boss, Ron Fazio. He, however, did not survive. Fazio was one of 176 Aon employees who died that day. He was 57.

"He's the reason I'm here, there's no question about it," 52-year-old Labetti says. "Most of us survived that day because of him."

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8:31 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Enbridge dredging in full-swing in Calhoun County

Lead in text: 
Environmental Protection Agency order requires dredging 40 mile stretch of Kalamazoo River
Large pipes, buoys and pontoon boats have been placed throughout sections of the Kalamazoo River as Enbridge Inc. works to fulfill an order by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to do additional cleanup. "We're not talking about the oil that was in 2010," company spokesman Jason Manshum said at Enbridge's office in Marshall.
8:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Lawsuit filed over possible fracking in Allegan State Game area

Lead in text: 
U.S. Secretary of the Department of the Interior and Bureau of Land Management are named as defendants
GRAND RAPIDS, MI - An Allegan County couple has filed a lawsuit against the federal government to prevent leasing of mineral rights for fracking in the Allegan State Game Area. John Davis Jr. and Marybeth Pritschet-Davis, whose Monterey Township property abuts the game area, filed the lawsuit on Thursday, Sept.
8:15 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

WMU football: Tyler Van Tubbergan to start at quarterback in home opener Saturday

Lead in text: 
Broncos host Nicholls State in CommUniverCity Night game Saturday night
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Western Michigan senior quarterback Tyler Van Tubbergen will start Saturday's game against Nicholls State University, Broncos head coach P.J. Fleck said Thursday. Van Tubbergen left last week's game at Michigan State in the second quarter with an apparent concussion and was replaced by redshirt freshman Zach Terrell.
Arts & Life
6:10 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

'Smitten Kitchen' Author On Learning To Love Kale

Food blogger Deb Perelman was initially a kale skeptic — until this Kale Salad With Pecorino And Walnuts changed her mind.
Deb Perelman

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:21 pm

Kale has experienced a renaissance in recent years. Once relegated to the sidelines as a mere garnish, the green now appears on 400 percent more restaurant menus than it did four years ago.

But not everyone has bought into the gospel of the vitamin- and mineral-rich green. Even Deb Perelman, who writes the blog and cookbook Smitten Kitchen, was initially a kale skeptic.

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Arts & Life
5:54 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Swing Your Partner: W.Va. Circles Back To Square Dancing

A couple takes to the floor in Harmon, W.Va., in 2012. West Virginia is trying to revitalize its square-dance tradition.
Jessie Wright-Mendoza for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:21 pm

Square dancing, once a pillar of small-town life, is making a comeback in West Virginia. A statewide project is trying to help communities preserve and promote this part of their cultural heritage.

Marlinton, W.Va., is one of the towns taking up the cause. Its square dances can gather a crowd, but residents still worry about attracting the attention of the next generation.

If you go to a square dance in Marlinton, there are some rules to follow. First of all, leave your stereotypes at the door, says Becky Hill, who works on The Mountain Dance Trail initiative.

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U.S.
5:20 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

BP Wants To Halt Deepwater Horizon Claims Process

Crude oil that leaked from the Deepwater Horizon oil rig sits on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:21 pm

BP is fighting the settlement it agreed to last summer that let the oil company avoid thousands of potential lawsuits over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Just after the spill, when oil was still gushing into the Gulf, BP touted the $20 billion it set aside for claims. But now it says the claim process is corrupt and is hoping a court will overturn the settlement that established the claims fund.

Ending the claims would mean stopping a well-oiled machine.

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Arts & More
5:06 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Street artist makes mental health installation with Kalamazoo teens

Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

“You’re crazy.” Those words might not hurt you, but to someone with a mental illness or disability it’s a phrase they have to deal with all too often. Artist Patrick Hershberger, also known as Bonus Saves, has collaborated with a youth group to create art that stresses how important language can be in mental health. It will be in the Park Trades Center’s Saniwax Gallery. The main reception is on Friday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

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Around the Nation
4:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Sailors With Disabilities Find Freedom On The Water

Members of the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors sail every weekend near San Francisco's Pier 40. The all-volunteer group serves people with a range of physical, developmental and mental disabilities.
Emily Green for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:21 pm

If you think sailing at 40 mph sounds challenging, imagine doing it all alone without the use of your arms or legs, or without hearing or with limited vision. Every weekend in San Francisco, a group of sailors with disabilities does just that, taking to the water to push their bodies to the limit.

Cristina Rubke and her father, Chris, are members of the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors. On a recent Saturday, they were at San Francisco's Pier 40, where the dock is awash in activity.

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NPR Story
4:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Illegal Immigration A Hot Issue In Australian Election

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:10 pm

A tightly-fought Australian general election campaign reaches its climax on Saturday — and the major issues will be familiar to an American audience. With little to choose between the economic policies of the two major parties, immigration and same-sex marriage are top of the news agenda.

NPR Story
4:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

What Elevated Kale From Vegetable To Cultural Identifier?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:10 pm

Of all the healthy foods you could eat, what inspires some people to wear kale T-shirts and sport kale stickers? Why do some people see kale as a part of their identities?

TED Radio Hour on WMUK-2

A journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, and new ways to think and create.  Based on riveting TED Talks from the world's most remarkable minds.

 

Joe's Big Idea
3:38 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Coronal Holes: The (Rarely Round) Gaps In The Sun's Atmosphere

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this picture of the sun on June 18. The dark blue area in the upper left quadrant of the sun is a huge coronal hole more than 400,000 miles across. Coronal holes are areas of the sun's outermost atmospheric layer — the corona — where the magnetic field opens up and solar material quickly flows out.
NASA/SDO

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:21 pm

There's a hole in the sun's corona. But don't worry — that happens from time to time.

"A coronal hole is just a big, dark blotch that we see on the sun in our images," says Dean Pesnell, project scientist for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. "We can only see them from space, because when we look at them [through] a regular telescope, they don't appear."

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Upton on Syria
3:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Upton says he's leaning against voting to authorize strikes against Syria

Protestors outside of U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy's (D-VT) office opposing possible military action against Syria
Credit The Associated Press

Congressman Fred Upton on possible military action against Syria

    

West Michigan Congressman Fred Upton says he owes it to his constituents and the nation to get as many facts as he can. 

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

The Incredible Case Of The Bank Robber Who's Now A Law Clerk

After serving almost 11 years in federal prison for bank robbery, Shon Hopwood is a law student at the University of Washington. He's landed a prestigious law clerk's position with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.
Sang Cho Courtesy of The Daily of the University of Washington

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 2:03 pm

"I had no prior history with the law other than breaking it."

"I thought, 'this kid is a punk.' "

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Music Reviews
1:57 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

On Its New Album, Superchunk Makes The Downtrodden Sound Upbeat

Superchunk's new album is titled I Hate Music.
Jason Arthurs Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 1:53 pm

"I hate music, what is it worth? / Can't bring anyone back to this earth," the band Superchunk sings. It's the kind of sentiment you'd imagine someone blurting out with bitter spontaneity, but it's not really music the band hates; it's the despair and grief to which their music bears witness. Superchunk's new downbeat-but-upbeat album, I Hate Music, is dedicated to a close friend who died last year.

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Author Interviews
1:46 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

What's Mittens Thinking? Make 'Sense' Of Your Cat's Behavior

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:43 pm

Cats have come a long way from being animals charged with catching mice to treasured, adorable creatures that snuggle with us in our beds. But this relatively new arrangement is creating issues for cats and the people who live with them.

John Bradshaw has studied the history of domesticated cats and how the relationship between people and cats has changed. He's the author of the new book Cat Sense: How the New Feline Science Can Make You a Better Friend to Your Pet, which is a follow-up to his book Dog Sense.

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Movies
11:56 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Autism: Film Shows Education Challenges For Young Adults And Families

Best Kept Secret is a film that follows a group of young adults with autism during their last year of high school. Host Michel Martin speaks with filmmaker Samantha Buck and Janet Mino, a special education teacher.

Education
11:56 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Ranking Schools Based On What Matters

President Obama recently proposed a new college ranking system, based on more than test scores. The Washington Monthly has been doing that for years. Host Michel Martin finds out more.

Music
11:56 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Pfister Sisters Bring Fun To Old Jazz Standard

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we are moving into fall, so we are leaving you today with one final summer song. For the last several weeks, Gwen Thompkins has been bringing us wonderful musical nuggets from guests on her program, Music Inside Out. That's heard on WWNO in New Orleans. They're current artists who're bringing back old classics. Today, Gwen joins us for a listen to the Pfister Sisters.

GWEN THOMPKINS, BYLINE: The Pfister Sisters are a girl group that's been around for 30 years, so I don't know if it really is fair to call them a girl group.

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Nature
10:34 am
Thu September 5, 2013

For the love of trees: Growing hundred year old giants

Blaine Mosher stands in front of an old red oak on his farm
Credit Nancy Camden

When a seed falls from a tree, what are the odds that it will take root and then grow for 300 years or more? Norm Bober in Van Buren County increases the possibility. As a teenager, when his family went to hunt for a Christmas tree, he brought pine cones home and planted the seeds. The next spring, they sprouted into pine trees.

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