Politics
6:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How Kennedy's Assassination Changed The Secret Service

The limousine carrying President John F. Kennedy races toward the hospital after he was shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, with Secret Service agent Clint Hill riding on the back.
Justin Newman AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:45 am

Nov. 22 will mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, a moment that left an indelible mark on those who remember it.

It also permanently changed the agency charged with protecting the president — the U.S. Secret Service.

Looking back at the images of Kennedy, first lady Jackie Kennedy, Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife waving as they rode through the streets of Dallas in an open Lincoln, it all looks terribly innocent and naive.

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The Salt
6:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How 17th Century Fraud Gave Rise To Bright Orange Cheese

Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene.
Courtesy of A. Blake Gardner

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 9:46 am

The news from Kraft last week that the company is ditching two artificial dyes in some versions of its macaroni and cheese products left me with a question.

Why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turns out there's a curious history here.

In theory, cheese should be whitish — similar to the color of milk, right?

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Around the Nation
6:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

School Named For Former KKK Leader Reconsiders Its Legacy

Nathan Bedford Forrest served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The high school that bears his name, now majority African-American, has been at the center of controversy for decades.
Mike Wintroath AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 8:41 pm

Duval County Public Schools is considering a name change for Nathan Bedford Forrest High School in Jacksonville, Fla. The school is named for a Confederate hero who was the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan — and after five decades of debate, there appears to be momentum for change.

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Book Reviews
5:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Inspired By History, A Novelist Writes Of Jewish South Africa

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

Roughly three-quarters of South Africa's Jewish population are descendants of Lithuanian immigrants. Of these peasants, townspeople, tradesmen, shopkeepers and intellectuals who fled centuries of persecution and embarked on a passage to Africa, many dreamed of a new land and the promise of new beginnings. Kenneth Bonert's ancestors were part of this diaspora. In his debut novel, written in language as dense and varied as the South African landscape he describes, Bonert delivers a taut, visceral account of a young Jewish boy's African life.

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Around the Nation
5:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Trim Recess? Some Schools Hold On To Child's Play

Students play tag at Ruby Bridges Elementary in Alameda, Calif. The school has expanded recess time with help from the nonprofit group Playworks.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

It's recess time at Ruby Bridges Elementary School and a third-grader is pummeling a plastic tetherball with focused intensity. He's playing at one of more than a half-dozen recess play stations on the school's sprawling cement playground — there's also wall ball, basketball, capture the flag, sharks and minnows, a jungle gym and tag.

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Code Switch
5:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Striking Harmonies With The Jubilee Singers' Past And Present

Soprano Nigia Hunt is a junior at Durham School of the Arts. She and others are singing for Paul Kwami, auditioning for a solo in the Duke Performances concert.
Leoneda Inge/NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

The Fisk Jubilee Singers are known worldwide for their flawless voices and stellar performances of Negro spirituals. They're from Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn., but they travel around the world to perform their music. Negro spirituals were originally sung by slaves and remain tightly linked to African-American culture. Paul Kwami, the choir's musical director, said singing these spirituals was a way for slaves to lament their servitude, along with the hope of being free one day.

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Author Interviews
3:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Roy Choi's Tacos Channel LA And The Immigrant Experience

Chef Roy Choi was named Food and Wine Magazine's Best New Chef in 2010.
Bobby Fisher Courtesy of Harper Collins

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:24 pm

Roy Choi is a chef who's celebrated for food that isn't fancy. He's one of the founders of the food truck movement, where instead of hot dogs or ice cream, more unusual, gourmet dishes are prepared and sold. His Kogi trucks specialize in tacos filled with Korean barbecue.

Choi was born in South Korea in 1970 and moved to Los Angeles with his parents at the age of 2. His parents owned a Korean restaurant near Anaheim for a few years when he was a child. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that his mother had some serious cooking talent.

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The Salt
3:48 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

FDA Moves To Phase Out Remaining Trans Fats In Food Supply

Crisco was the original product made with partially hydrogenated soybean oil, which contains trans fats. Today, Crisco has only small amounts of the fats.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

If the Food and Drug Administration has its way, an era of food technology will soon end. The agency announced Thursday it is aiming to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products.

Margaret Hamburg, the FDA commissioner, said at a press conference that her agency has come to the preliminary conclusion that the oils "are not generally recognized as safe for use in food."

If the agency makes this decision final, it will mean a complete ban on this ingredient.

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Book Reviews
3:04 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Self-Help Messiah' Dale Carnegie Gets A Second Life In Print

Courtesy of Other Press

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:50 pm

"Make the other person feel important." "Let the other fellow feel that the idea is his." "Make people like you." Those are some of the peppy commands that have sent generations of Americans out into the world, determined to win friends and influence people — oh, and make big bucks.

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Parallels
1:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Who Owns The Archives Of A Vanishing Iraqi Jewish World?

This colorfully illustrated French and Hebrew Passover Haggadah was published in Vienna in 1930. Caption on the image: "Eating Matzah." This restored document is part of an exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., that opens Nov. 8.
National Archives

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:22 pm

When U.S. troops entered the basement of Saddam Hussein's secret police building in Baghdad a decade ago, they were looking for weapons of mass destruction. They didn't find any.

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1:20 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Democrats say 130,000 in Michigan will lose unemployment benefits without extension

Lead in text: 
Republicans argue program costs too much
Nearly 44,000 people in Michigan will lose unemployment benefits in late December if Congress doesnt extend emergency benefits, while another 86,500 people in Michigan would lose benefits by June 2014, according to a Thursday report. The House Ways and Means Committees Democrats said an estimated 1.3 million Americans nationwide will lose benefits the week of Dec.
12:35 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Panera Bread union and owners to meet

Lead in text: 
Labor dispute has been complicated by U.S. Supreme Court case and Michigan's new "right to work" law
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Almost 20 months after Panera Bread bakers in Southwest Michigan voted to form the chain's first union in the United States, they are expected to sit down with their employer at the bargaining table Thursday.
Parallels
12:10 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

In Libya, The Militias Rule While Government Founders

Militias from towns throughout the country's west parade through Tripoli, Libya, in 2012. Analysts say the country is awash with heavy weapons in the hands of militias divided by tribe, ideology and region. The central government has little power over the gunmen.
Abdel Magid Al Fergany AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

Zintan, a mountain town in northwestern Libya, is a place of gray and brown buildings, with little infrastructure, about 50,000 people and no central government control.

The Libyan government doesn't provide basic services, not even water. People use wells to provide for themselves. The local council runs all of Zintan's affairs out of a building in the center of town.

At the local militia base on the outskirts of town, we meet the keeper of Saif el-Islam Gadhafi, the son and one-time heir apparent of Moammar Gadhafi.

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NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Congolese Rebels Put Down Arms, But Will Another Group Rise Up?

The Congolese rebel group M-23 is has been condemned for its years of brutal violence against civilians. But now, they've vowed to lay down their weapons. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the issue with NPR's Eastern Africa correspondent Gregory Warner.

NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Doctor In Eastern Congo: 'Not Normal To Be Attacked'

The eastern Congo is known to some as the 'rape capital of the world' because nearly 50 women are raped there every hour. Dr. Denis Mukwege, a gynecologist, has put his practice, and his life on the line, to help save these women. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with him about his work.

NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Typing Love Letters To St. Louis

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is actually on her way to St. Louis Public Radio. Coming up, we'll take a look at the Arab Spring through street art, paintings and photographs. We'll hear from the curator and a featured artist from a new exhibit at the Arab American National Museum. But first, as I just mentioned, TELL ME MORE is taking the show to St. Louis tomorrow.

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NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Art Revolution Blooms After Arab Spring

A painter uses his brush against a policeman armed with a mace. This mural is at the intersection of Muhammad Mahmud Street and Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt.
Mona Abaza

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:10 pm

In the U.S., graffiti is often condemned as vandalism. But during the Arab Spring, artists say city walls were often the only places where they could talk back to tyrants.

Street art can be found across the Middle East and North Africa, and the Arab Spring protests inspired an artistic revolution. The "Creative Dissent" exhibit at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan is putting that art on display.

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Business
10:10 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Twitter Makes Market Debut

The New York Stock Exchange is at the center of attention Thursday morning as Twitter goes public at $26 per share. That means company is expected to raise almost $2 billion. For the latest on this highly anticipated IPO, NPR's Zoe Chace talks with host David Greene.

9:57 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Kalamazoo County Board Chairman announces he's running for state House

Lead in text: 
David Maturen hopes to win seat currently held by fellow Republican Jase Bolger, the current Speaker of the Michigan House
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Kalamazoo County Board Chair David Maturen announced his candidacy today for the 63rd District state House seat in 2014. The 63rd District, which encompasses portions of eastern Kalamazoo and western Calhoun counties, is currently represented by state Rep. and Speaker of the House Jase Bolger, who isn't eligible to run again because of term limits.
History
8:59 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Outlaws, immigrants, a hymn and a big flood - Albion's history

Historian Frank Passic in Albion
Credit Nancy Camden

Like a lot of small towns in Michigan, Albion has seen better economic times. But their local historian Frank Passic champions Albion’s history as well as today’s downtown.

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7:34 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Bridge Magazine examines how Portage has no unfunded pension or retiree health care debt

Lead in text: 
Kalamazoo faces challenge of paying for retiree health care
  • Source: Bridgemi
  • | Via: The Center for Michigan
KALAMAZOO/PORTAGE - A quick drive through Kalamazoo and its bordering neighbor to the south, Portage, reveals some obvious differences. Others are less so. Kalamazoo, older and more ethnically diverse, has its share of historic downtown buildings, a mix of vintage and blue-collar neighborhoods and the campus of Western Michigan University.
Around the Nation
7:08 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Will Free Bacon Get A Crowd To Kansas State Basketball Game?

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. The women's basketball team at Kansas State is hoping for a sizzling season. For their home opener tomorrow night they're trying a new promotion - bacon - which evidently goes great with everything, including basketball. Students will get in for free and also get a boat of bacon, something resembling the paper container nachos are served in.

7:04 am
Thu November 7, 2013

General Mills plans distribution center in Comstock Township

Lead in text: 
New center is expected to be operational by July of 2014 and create 27 new jobs over two years
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- General Mills is coming to town. Worldwide food maker and distributor General Mills will establish a new, 155,000-square-foot distribution center -- focused primarily on its yogurt business -- at the Midlink Business Park in Comstock Township.
Space
7:00 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Olympic Torch On Its Way To International Space Station

The Olympic torch was launched into space on Wednesday night. It will accompany astronauts on a spacewalk before returning to Earth on Nov. 10.

6:55 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Kalamazoo authorities review procedures after mentally ill man walks away from residential facility

Lead in text: 
Residents near home raise concerns about lack of information
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- A guy who, as a teen, beat his grandfather to death with a hammer and left his grandmother for dead walks away from his residential foster home in Kalamazoo. Neighbors first learn about the incident --- and the man's past -- from news reports.
6:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Snyder says he'll still advocate for consolidation despite vote in Saugatuck and Douglas

Lead in text: 
Snyder says "it's a local decision that needs to be made"
Voters in the southwest Michigan cities of Saugatuck and Douglas roundly rejected a proposal Tuesday to combine their two resort towns along the shores of Lake Michigan. "There just wasn't enough reward with the consolidation," said Matt Balmer, a restaurant owner, resident of Douglas and leader of the anti-consolidation forces.
6:14 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Two Benton Harbor schools downgraded by state

Lead in text: 
State ranking of schools is based on achievement, improvement and within school achievement gaps.
BENTON HARBOR - The state has placed two more Benton Harbor schools on the Priority School list, previously called the Persistently Lowest Achieving list. Placed on the list were the International Academy at Hull and Montessori Academy at Henry C. Morton.
NPR Story
4:54 am
Thu November 7, 2013

'Homesick Hijacker' To Appear In Miami Courtroom

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:11 am

Nearly 30 years ago, William Potts hijacked a plane to Cuba. He is scheduled to be in court in Miami on Thursday. It's the first time he's been in the U.S. for nearly three decades.

Business
4:54 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Most Remaining Blockbusters To Close In January

Blockbuster is going to shut all of its company-owned stores. Some franchise stores will stay open. At its peak, the video rental chain had about 9,000 stores.

Middle East
4:54 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Suspicions Bog Down Talks On Iran's Nuclear Program

Negotiators from Iran and six world powers resume talks Thursday in Geneva on Iran's nuclear program. Iran's Supreme Leader says he's not optimistic, and U.S. officials say "no deal is better than a bad deal." Still, Iran's desire to get out from under crippling economic sanctions may drive progress forward despite the long odds.

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