Animals
7:18 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Chinese Zoo Substitutes Dog For Lion

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Zoos are great for teaching kids about the different sounds that animals make. Monkeys go ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh-oh-ah, horses go nay, and lions go woof. Wait. What? A mother, taking her son around a zoo in China, thought her boy was mistaken when he pointed out the barking lion. He was right. The zoo had taken their African lion away for breeding, and subbed in an employee's large, hairy dog. The mom felt cheated.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:42 am
Fri August 16, 2013

DIA petition drive begins

Lead in text: 
Organizers say they have collected at least 2,143 signatures with a goal of 3,000.
MoveOn.org, the left-leaning political organization that helped elect President Obama in 2008, has launched a petition drive imploring the president to declare the imperiled Detroit Institute of Arts a national monument. The hope is that such a designation would immunize the museum's collection from sale to pay off Detroit's debts in the bankruptcy proceedings.
6:12 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Snyder "NERD Fund" gets less money

Lead in text: 
The fund has been criticized by watchdog groups because it isn't required to report details of unlimited and anonymous donations from companies and individuals.
LANSING - Fund-raising by Gov. Rick Snyder's controversial "NERD Fund" was down sharply in 2012 and the nonprofit organization spent more money than it took in, according to a financial report released late Wednesday. In a report filed with the Internal Revenue Service, Snyder's New Energy to Reinvent and Diversify Fund said it raised $368,000 in 2012, down from $1.3 million in 2011.
5:57 am
Fri August 16, 2013

St. Joseph County commissioner may face gun charges

Lead in text: 
A police report says the incident followed an argument between County Commissioner Donald Eaton and several other men. The case could be sent to prosecutors in another county on Friday.
STURGIS, MI -- A St. Joseph County commissioner had two guns confiscated and could face criminal charges after he brought a handgun into the Sturgis Applebee's after a drunken argument last month, according to a police report.
Race
5:29 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Chinatown's 'White Devil John' Sentenced To 20 Years

John Willis, also known as "White Devil John" in Cantonese, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for money laundering and drug charges.
Jane Collins for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:29 pm

The conviction this week of mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger put an end to one of Boston's highest-profile crime sagas.

Less well-known, though, is the case of John Willis, a white man from Dorchester, Mass., who was sentenced in federal court on Thursday to 20 years in prison for drug trafficking and money laundering.

Read more
NPR Story
5:27 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Doctors Without Borders To Pull Out Of Somalia

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Somalia is a country that has long been plagued by horrific violence, where even humanitarian groups are targeted. Just a month ago, two workers from Doctors Without Borders were released after 21 months in captivity. The group has had 16 staff killed in their 22 years operating in Somalia. Well, now Doctors Without Borders says it has had enough. For just the second time in its history, the group is completely pulling out of a country because of safety concerns.

Read more
Business
5:27 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On C-Max Hybrid

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an EPA crackdown.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Ford Motor Company will reduce the fuel economy sticker on its new C-Max hybrid to 43 miles per gallon, down from its earlier estimate of 47.

As Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, the change has generated a new review of fuel economy testing standards.

Read more
Food
2:57 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Demystifying Saffron: Mark Bittman Explains The Pricey Spice

Marilyn Barbone iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:25 pm

In the latest installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, New York Times columnist and cookbook author Mark Bittman sheds a little light on saffron — a spice that has been stumping Lennet Radke in Wisconsin. Radke, who received a little jar in a contest, says she's never really used it. The stuff isn't cheap. And that knowledge alone can stifle experimentation.

Read more
StoryCorps
2:56 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Riding Choppers And Harleys To Protect Kids In Need

Happy Dodson (left) and Taz Roman are president and treasurer, respectively, of the Connecticut chapter of Bikers Against Child Abuse.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:36 am

Happy Dodson and Taz Roman are bikers. Not cyclists, but the leather jacket and chained wallet kind of bikers. They're also members of a group called Bikers Against Child Abuse.

The nonprofit, with chapters across the U.S. and in some parts of Europe, accepts referrals from parents, guardians, police, social workers and other agencies. Whenever those kids don't feel safe, they can call Happy, Taz and their other biker friends, who come straight to the child's house.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:55 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Herzog Plumbs Guilt And Loss Wrought By Texting And Driving

Reggie Shaw killed two men while he was texting on a Utah highway. He now speaks to groups about the dangers of texting and driving.
ShareATT YouTube

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:31 pm

Read more
Art Fundraisers
12:09 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Umbrellas line Red Arrow Highway in Harbert

One of the Umbrellas of Harbert along Red Arrow Highway
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The town of Harbert is only about a mile wide when you drive through on it Red Arrow Highway near the Indiana border in Southwest Michigan. And it would look like any other small town if it weren’t for one big, colorful difference.

Read more
Parallels
7:09 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Scene From A Cairo Mosque Turned Morgue

A man walks among shrouded bodies at a Cairo mosque on Thursday. At the El-Iman mosque, more than 200 bodies were being prepared for burial, the victims killed in a crackdown on protesters by Egypt's military-backed government.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 8:50 pm

After the bloodshed, comes the grief.

A man weeps as he surveys row upon row of corpses. Some are completely burned. "They are all my brothers," he cries.

Nearby, men methodically break apart blocks of ice in two caskets inside this Cairo mosque. They then place them under the bodies to stop them from decomposing.

But still the sickly sweet smell of death hangs in the air.

Volunteers burn incense and spray air freshener to mask it, but that only adds to the stifling atmosphere.

Read more
Code Switch
5:42 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Bayard Rustin: The Man Who Organized The March On Washington

Activist Bayard Rustin points to a map during a press conference four days ahead of the March on Washington in August 1963.
AP

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 4:03 pm

The trailblazing strategist behind the 1963 March on Washington will this year be posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. That's a long way from the days when civil rights activists counted on Bayard Rustin's hard work, but tried to push him aside because he was gay.

For 60 years, Rustin fought for peace and equal rights — demonstrating, organizing and protesting in the United States and around the world.

'Strategic Nonviolence'

Read more
5:34 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Uninsured Michiganders to get help signing up

Lead in text: 
Most residents have to sign up for one of about 14 insurance plans in Michigan or face tax penalties, but signing up online isn't easy for everyone.
Less than two months from the launch of the state's on-line insurance marketplace, four Michigan organizations have been handed $2.5 million in federal funds to help consumers navigate the new system. The health insurance exchange, part of federal healthcare reform, goes live Oct.
5:30 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Right-to-work covers state employees

Lead in text: 
The Michigan Court of Appeals made that ruling Thursday. This means state employees can choose not to pay union dues as soon as January when new union contracts take effect.
LANSING - The 35,000 unionized employees who work for the state of Michigan are subject to the state's new right-to-work law, the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled today. The 2-1 ruling by the court means state workers can now opt out of paying union dues once the next round of contracts take effect in January.
5:28 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

South Beach closed until Friday afternoon

Lead in text: 
The beach has been closed for a week since high concentrations of E. coli were found there last Thursday.
SOUTH HAVEN, MI -- South Haven's South Beach remains closed to swimmers and will stay that way until results of water samples are available Friday afternoon, public health officials say. Water samples from South Beach water were taken Thursday morning, said Mick Mcguire, of the Van Buren/Cass County Health Department.
Found Recipes
5:27 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Drowning In Zucchini? 3 Recipes Can Help

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 3:57 pm

There's no shame in admitting it: Mid-August may be the point in the summer when you throw up your hands when it comes to zucchini. The vegetable is both the joy and bane of gardeners and cooks. Joy because there are so many possibilities — bread, fritters, stuffed blossoms and ratatouille. And bane because the plants never seem to stop growing, producing squash nearly nonstop until you're up to your eyeballs in the green things.

Kate Workman, author of The Mom 100 cookbook and blog, knows that pain.

Read more
5:26 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

"Quiet cars" now available between Kalamazoo and Chicago

Lead in text: 
People in the quiet car are not allowed to talk loudly or use cell phones and noisy computer programs.
LANSING - Train passengers who want some peace and quiet will find respite on Amtrak's specially designated rail cars. Starting Monday, the passenger rail service will designate a "quiet car" on each of its trains on the Wolverine line that travels through Pontiac, Detroit, Ann Arbor, Jackson, Kalamazoo and several other cities on its way to Chicago.
The Salt
5:24 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Can Quinoa Farming Go Global Without Leaving Andeans Behind?

A man cleans quinoa grain in Pacoma, Bolivia.
Juan Karita AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 3:53 pm

I ate quinoa-and-turkey chili in a cafeteria today, which, when you think about it, is pretty amazing. Rarely does an entire culture, almost overnight, adopt an entirely new food.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:54 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Meet The Olinguito, The Newest Member Of The Raccoon Family

The olinguito is the first carnivore species to be discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.
Courtesy of Mark Gurney

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:44 pm

Scientists have just solved a case of mistaken identity. It involves a creature that looks like a cross between a house cat and a teddy bear, and it lives high up in the cloud forests of the Andes.

For over 100 years, scientists thought this animal was a well-known member of the raccoon family. Specifically, they thought it was a critter called the "olingo." But one scientist recently took another look and realized he had an entirely new species on his hands.

Read more
Music Reviews
1:50 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Forgotten Quartet, Reissued And Reevaluated

A new collection of Brahms and Mozart recordings by the Stuyvesant Quartet from 1947 conveys a kind of inward grace.
Jay Shulman Courtesy of the artist

A movie last year called A Late Quartet told the traumatic story of what happens when a famous string quartet has to change personnel. But, in fact, most string quartets — like symphony orchestras, only more conspicuously — continually change players, because players retire, or die, or get more lucrative offers.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:41 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Of Neurons And Memories: Inside The 'Secret World Of Sleep'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:13 pm

What happens in our brains while we're asleep? That's one question neuroscientist Penelope Lewis is trying to answer. She directs the Sleep and Memory Lab at the University of Manchester in England. Her new book is The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest.

Lewis joins Fresh Air's Terry Gross to talk about how sleep affects memory, and how REM sleep can affect depression.


Interview Highlights

On how sleep makes memory stronger

Read more
Book Reviews
1:41 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Gossipy, Nostalgic History Of A Publishing 'Hothouse'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 3:28 pm

In the world of book publishing, ravaged though it may be, the name Farrar, Straus & Giroux still bespeaks literary quality. It's a publishing house that boasts a roll call of 25 Nobel Prize winners and heavyweights like Susan Sontag, Carlos Fuentes, Joan Didion, Philip Roth and Jonathan Franzen. A lot of writers, past and present, have turned down higher advances for their books from other publishing houses for the honor of being an FSG author.

Read more
Beauty Shop
12:13 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Snooty Swiss Saleswoman Equals Racism?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we head to Barbados for a twisted family tale that spans centuries. "Sugar in the Blood" is the latest in our summer island read series. More on that in just a few minutes. But first, a visit to the beauty shop. That's where our panel of female commentators and journalists get a fresh cut on the week's news.

Read more
Books
12:08 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Family Tree That Includes Slaves — And Slave Owners

Andrea Stuart is also the author of The Rose of Martinique: A Life of Napoleon's Josephine.
Clara Molden Camera Press Redux

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:15 pm

Part of our summer reading series Island Reads, highlighting authors from the Caribbean

Andrea Stuart was curious about her family's history in Barbados. And through years of careful research, she found that her bloodline includes both slave owners and slaves. She has written about her own family, as well as a detailed history of slavery in the Caribbean, in her book Sugar in the Blood. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Stuart about her family history, the moral complexity of slavery and finding roots in the past.

Read more
Music
12:08 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Summer Songs: Clarinetist Remakes 50 Cent

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we continue our Summer Songs series. Gwen Thompkins, the host of Music Inside Out on WWNO in New Orleans, is introducing us to a handful of contemporary artists who've taken some old classics out for a new spin. This week, she tells us about an unlikely pairing with New Orleans favorite Michael White.

Read more
Middle East
11:40 am
Thu August 15, 2013

U.S. Cancels Military Exercise With Egypt Amid Crackdown

President Obama announced the cancellation of a joint military exercise with Egypt in the wake of that country's military government crackdown on protesters. At least 500 were killed in those skirmishes, including 40 police. For more, David Greene speaks with NPR's Scott Horsley.

8:41 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Kalamazoo's airport may get bigger

Lead in text: 
Most of the cost of acquiring the land from Pfizer will be covered by a federal grant.
KALAMAZOO, MI - The Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport may soon expand by nearly 70 acres with the aid of more than $1 million in federal funds. A use for the new property hasn't been determined.
8:37 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Oshtemo officials appeal power line ruling

Lead in text: 
The company behind the project says it is pleased that state officials have approved the new transmission line.
OSHTEMO TOWNSHIP, MI -- The state has approved plans for high-voltage power transmission lines through several miles of Oshtemo Township, but the township will appeal the decision. The Oshtemo Township Board of Trustees met in closed session Tuesday to discuss its response to a ruling from the Michigan Public Service Commission that granted a certificate of public convenience and necessity to ITC for its proposed Weeds Lake project.
8:33 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Portage voters get new polling places this fall

Lead in text: 
The change affects 20 precincts in the city that have been moved out of schools into churches or public buildings.
PORTAGE, MI - Many Portage voters heading to the polls Nov. 5 will be voting at a new precinct location. Heightened security measures at schools prompted Portage officials including City Clerk Jim Hudson to find new polling precincts not in a school building.

Pages