Health
5:28 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Despite Early Stages, Alzheimer's Affects Couple's Big Picture

Pansy Greene, 73, is in the early stages of Alzheimer's. She and her husband, Winston, have been married for 57 years. She says her secret to maintaining a normal life is to stay active and positive.
David P. Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 11:22 am

NPR has been following Pansy and Winston Greene, a California couple struggling with an Alzheimer's diagnosis. Three years ago, Pansy learned she had Alzheimer's disease, and over this past summer, the couple told NPR that their day-to-day lives haven't changed much. That's still true. But on this second visit, they each seem to be looking at the future a bit differently.

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NPR Story
2:03 am
Sat November 16, 2013

The Soulful, Swinging Sounds Of Stax: A Look Back

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 11:22 am

Memphis' Stax Records was an international sensation, putting out hits like Sam and Dave's "Hold On, I'm Coming," "Green Onions" by Booker T. and the MGs and Otis Redding's "Try a Little Tenderness." But behind the music, Stax's story features racial harmony in a city with a troubled history. There are tragedies, lost opportunities and legal disputes, but also some of the most soulful music you'll ever hear.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:03 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 10:50 am

More questions for the panel: Xbox X-rays; A Cruller Fate; Professor Pampers; The Language of Huh.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:03 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 10:50 am

Carl reads three news-related limericks: A Thanksgivukkah Crisis; Hair-raising Havarti; Beware Mr. Compact Class.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:03 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 10:50 am

Our panelists predict what will be the first thing delivered by the Post Office on Sunday.

NPR Story
4:46 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Can You Keep Your Old Health Plan? It May Depend On Where You Live

President Obama met at the White House with CEOs from across the health insurance industry on Friday. Insurers, he says, will be allowed to renew for one more year health policies that don't meet the new national standards set by the Affordable Care Act.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:36 pm

President Obama's proposal to try to let more people keep their canceled health insurance policies sounded so simple when he announced it Thursday.

"Insurers can extend current plans that would otherwise be canceled into 2014. And Americans whose plans have been canceled can choose to re-enroll in the same kind of plan," he said in unveiling the proposal at the White House.

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Movie Interviews
4:46 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Steve Coogan, Tacking Toward The Funny Side Of Serious

Steve Coogan acts alongside Judi Dench in Philomena, the story of a woman searching for her son and the cynical journalist helping her find him.
Alex Bailey The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:07 pm

Philomena is the true story of a retired Irish nurse (Judi Dench) whose child was put up for adoption — against her will, by the nuns at the convent where she gave birth — when she was a teenager, and unwed. Fifty years later, a journalist grudgingly joins in her search for that son. The British comedian Steve Coogan, who also produced the project and co-wrote the screenplay, plays the reporter.

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Eric Deggans is NPR's first full-time TV critic.

Deggans came to NPR in 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times, where he served a TV/Media Critic and in other roles for nearly 20 years. A journalist for more than 20 years, he is also the author of Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation, a look at how prejudice, racism and sexism fuels some elements of modern media, published in October 2012, by Palgrave Macmillan.

NPR Story
4:34 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Is Running Your Car On Rubbish The Future Of Fuels?

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Environmental Protection Agency today proposed to scale back the amount of renewable fuels in our nation's gasoline supply, biofuels like ethanol made from corn. The EPA is responding, in part, to oil companies that say they're already taking as much ethanol as they can. They say any more and it will hurt quality. But there's another reason for the EPA's action. As NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports, cheap biofuels haven't been developed as quickly as hoped.

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NPR Story
4:34 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

After Further Review, MLB Says OK To Instant Replay

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 3:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. At their winter meetings in Orlando yesterday, Major League Baseball owners decided to join other sports, and expand the use of instant replay to adjudicate calls on the field. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins us now to discuss that and other off-season baseball matters. Hi, Stefan.

STEFAN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Robert.

SIEGEL: It's a big step for baseball. How will it work?

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Television
4:34 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Amazon Opens An Entertainment Door With 'Alpha House'

Mark Consuelos (from left), John Goodman, Clark Johnson and Matt Malloy star as four Republican senators sharing a house in Washington in Alpha House, Amazon's first original series.
Amazon Studios

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:07 pm

There are about a dozen reasons I really wanted to love Alpha House, an original comedy series about four U.S. senators sharing a home on Capitol Hill. It premieres on Amazon — yes, Amazon — on Friday.

The biggest reason: often-underrated star John Goodman, playing a politician up for re-election who knows exactly what voters value in a legislator:

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3:37 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

First wolf shot in Michigan wolf hunt

Lead in text: 
A Jackson County man shot a 75 pound male gray wolf in the Upper Peninsula near Baraga County.
A man from Rives Junction in Jackson County was the first to report a harvested wolf as Michigan's controversial first wolf hunt opened today. The man, who declined to give his name due to "death threats" he said he's received in the past from hunt opponents, shot a 75-pound, male gray wolf just after dawn in the Baraga Plains area of Baraga County.
3:35 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Leonid meteor shower best seen this weekend

Lead in text: 
EarthSky Magazine says it will be most visible on Saturday night because Sundays full moon will wash out light from the meteors.
Skywatchers, rejoice! The Leonid meteor shower, an annual mid-November treat, will be coming to a sky near you this weekend. The peak of the shower will be visible both Saturday and Sunday nights, according to EarthSky magazine. Unfortunately, the full moon comes Sunday, which will wash out all but the very brightest meteors from view.
Around the Nation
3:29 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Once An Ancient Village, Soon An Entertainment Complex?

In the middle of downtown Miami, archaeologists excavate a site holding evidence of a more than 1,000-year-old Tequesta Indian village.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:07 pm

As work began on one of the last pieces of undeveloped ground in Miami's fast-changing downtown, archaeologists uncovered the site of an American Indian village. It was already centuries old by the time Columbus arrived in the New World.

The question now for the city and the developer of the planned entertainment complex is how much of the site will be preserved.

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3:05 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

U.S. House passes Fred Upton's insurance bill, unlikely Senate will

Lead in text: 
President Obama’s administration says the President will likely veto the legislation. And that’s only if the bill passes through a largely Democratic Senate.
WASHINGTON - A Michigan lawmaker's proposal allowing insurers to sell current policies next year, even if they are out of compliance with the new health care act, passed the U.S. House as expected. But it's going nowhere fast. The bill, written by U.S. Rep. Fred Upton, R-St.
Movie Reviews
2:57 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Across 'Nebraska,' On A Journey That Goes Beyond The Trip

David (Will Forte, left) and his father, Woody (Bruce Dern, center), take time out of their quixotic journey to stop in Woody's small Nebraska hometown — where Woody's old business partner, Ed (Stacy Keach), is still nursing a grudge.
Merie W. Wallace Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:47 pm

Last month, I saw the trailer for Alexander Payne's Nebraska, and only the fact that it was a Payne film made me want to see it.

The premise seemed a dead end: Bruce Dern plays an elderly man named Woody Grant living in Billings, Mont., who gets a letter saying he's won $1 million. All he needs to do is call a number and maybe buy a magazine subscription.

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WMUK News
2:03 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

What really happens after the toilet flushes?

The control room at Kalamazoo's Wastewater Reclamation Plant
Credit Nancy Camden / WMUK

When the City of Kalamazoo built its first wastewater treatment plant to handle the raw sewage that had previously been dumped directly into the Kalamazoo River, it used the simple process of allowing solid material settle to the bottom of collection tanks. But with residents and businesses using more chemicals these days, the process needed to clean up sewage water is much more complex. It is admittedly not something most people think about, or want to. But it is necessary to prevent pollution. 

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Interviews
12:56 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Carol Burnett: The Fresh Air Interview

Carol Burnett arrives for the 16th Annual Mark Twain Prize For American Humor on Oct. 20 in Washington, D.C.
Kris Connor Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 2:57 pm

Carol Burnett won the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor in October. The award ceremony — including tributes from Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Martin Short and Vicki Lawrence — will be broadcast on PBS Sunday, Nov. 24.

Burnett was among the first women to host a TV variety show. The Carol Burnett Show ran on CBS from 1967 to '78, and won 22 Emmys. It was famous for its movie parodies, the soap opera spoof "As The Stomach Churns" and its sketches about a bickering family. For most of the show's run, Burnett shared the stage with Vicki Lawrence, Harvey Korman and Tim Conway.

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NPR Story
12:14 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Young Maasai Activist Challenges Circumcision Tradition

The African Maasai ethnic group is known for its deep roots in tradition and culture, including rights of passage for men and female circumcision. Now, young Maasai woman Nice Nailantei Leng'ete is crusading for alternative rites of passage and empowering young girls to continue their education in Kenya. She tells Michel Martin how she stood her ground to promote the dangers of female genital cutting.Note: This conversation may not be comfortable for all listeners.

NPR Story
12:14 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Music Lifts NASA Administrator's Spirits

NASA administrator.Charles F. Bolden, Jr. shares some of his worldly music selections in Tell Me More's occasional series In Your Ear.

Barbershop
12:14 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Can President Obama Get Back In The Game After Health Care 'Fumble'?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael, with us from Cleveland. From Boston, health care consultant and contributor to National Review magazine, Neil Minkoff. Here in Washington, Paul Butler, professor of law at Georgetown University. And Corey Dade, contributing editor for The Root. Take it away, Jimi.

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Music Reviews
12:08 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Two Sides Of Holiday Cheer From Kelly Clarkson, Nick Lowe

Kelly Clarkson's new holiday album is titled Wrapped in Red.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 2:57 pm

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11:25 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Berrien County Board not taking over Road Commission for now

Lead in text: 
County Commissioners have agreed to work on helping Road Commission fix problems
ST. JOSEPH - Berrien County commissioners made moves Thursday to bring the Road Commission board to full strength.
Campaign finance
9:23 am
Fri November 15, 2013

State Senate moves to limit Secretary of State's proposed disclosure rules

State Capitol - file photo
Credit WKAR, Kevin Lavery

Interview with Rich Robinson

    

Secretary of State Ruth Johnson proposed changing disclosure requirements for so-called "issue ads," but the state Senate moved quickly on Thursday to nullify any changes. 

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Asia
8:19 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Ikea's Typhoon Aid Overshadows China's Aid To Philippines

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: missed opportunity.

The typhoon in the Philippines prompted the U.S. to send money, food and an aircraft carrier, all of which may deepen relations with that U.S. Ally. China has tense relation with the Philippines but did not try the same gambit.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Asia
8:12 am
Fri November 15, 2013

China Expected To Loosen One-Child Policy

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

A state-run news service says the government will make a big change to the policy designed to restrain population growth. That policy has also led to a relative shortfall of young people and especially of girls.

Animals
7:50 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Researchers Figure Out Found Clam Was 507 Years Old

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The next time you dip into a bowl of clam chowder, consider this. You might be consuming a clam that has lived through a lot of history. We know this because a mollusk named Ming was 507 years old when it was dredged up in the ocean off Iceland a few years ago. When they first counted the rings on the shell of this common clam, scientists at Bangor University in Wales named it Ming in honor of the Chinese dynasty it was born into. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:23 am
Fri November 15, 2013

New Jersey Utility Plans To Keep Super Bowl Power Flowing

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This season's Super Bowl requires the same electricity flow as 12,000 homes. The utility for New Jersey, which is hosting the game, wants to keep that power flowing. The nightmare would be a repeat of last season's 34-minute blackout in New Orleans. So the company installed three power lines, any one of which could run the event. Hopefully that works since the last power failure was blamed on a broken device installed to prevent power failures.

Movie Reviews
7:19 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Bruce Dern's 'Transcendent Performance' In 'Nebraska'

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Back in May at the Cannes film festival, Bruce Dern won the best acting award for "Nebraska." That movie is now opening in theaters in the U.S. and here's film critic Kenneth Turan with a review.

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Typhoon Haiyan Devastates The Philippines
7:07 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Philippines Has A 'Love-Hate Relationship' With U.S.

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 10:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

American involvement in the Philippines goes much farther back than that. To look more at U.S.-Phillipine relations we turn to Patricio Abinales who grew up in the Philippines and is now a professor at the University of Hawaii. He says his country's love-hate relationship with the U.S. began in 1898. The United States kicked out colonial Spain after the Spanish-American War, but to the dismay of many Filipinos, the U.S. did not grant the country its freedom - instead ruling the islands for decades after crushing an independence movement.

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