6:41 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Lower turnout for Battle Creek city elections despite increase in registered voters

Lead in text: 
All but one of city's wards had lower turnout than in 2011
Fewer Battle Creek residents participated in this week's local election than in 2011, despite a slight increase in the number of registered voters. Only 9.9 percent of the city's 39,258 registered voters cast ballots on Tuesday for the next city commission, according to unofficial election numbers.
WMU basketball
6:26 am
Fri November 8, 2013

WMU to open men's basketball season this weekend

University Arena
Credit GS Photo/WMU Media Relations

Interview with David Drew - web version

Western Michigan University will open the men's basketball season with three games in Hawaii beginning on Saturday. 

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Television
4:47 am
Fri November 8, 2013

2 Finalists Vie To Be 'Master Chef Junior'

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tonight, a big moment for a couple of extraordinary chefs. They were originally 24 but after unimaginable cooking challenges, devastating eliminations, and, yes, some tears, the field is down to two. We're talking about the reality cooking show "Master Chef Junior." These contestants were ages eight to 13. Some stood on crates to reach their cooking stations? The two finalists: 12 year old Dara Yu and 13 year old Alexander Weiss. We spoke to them, along with one of the celebrity judges, Joe Bastianich.

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Around the Nation
4:47 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Should TSA Agents Have Broader Law Enforcement Powers?

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Airports around the country will hold a moment of silence this morning to honor Gerardo Hernandez. He was the TSA officer killed a week ago today at Los Angeles International Airport. That shooting is renewing debate over airport security and the role of the TSA. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports.

KIRK SIEGLER, BYLINE: Security at major airports is a web of moving parts, and a tangle of bureaucracies and jurisdictions.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR HORN HONKING)

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Politics
4:47 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Outside Money Plays Big Role In Va. Race For Governor

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Two of the big winners in Virginia's elections this week were not on the ballot. They actually aren't even Virginians. They are two men who spent more than $2 million each to help elect Democrat Terry McAuliffe as governor.

NPR's Peter Overby reports on the Election Day impact of San Francisco environmentalist Tom Steyer and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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Shots - Health News
3:06 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Persistence Pays Off For Uninsured Alaskan

Hairdresser Lara Imler used to be an accountant. She doesn't miss her old job, except for the insurance.
Annie Feidt

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Despite all the problems with HealthCare.gov, a few dozen Alaskans have managed to enroll in a health plan through the marketplace. Lara Imler is one of them.

Imler, a 37-year-old hair stylist in Anchorage, ditched her office job as an accountant in 2004. She says she loves making people feel better about themselves and is a lot happier cutting hair than she was sitting in front of a computer. But she does miss one big thing about her old job: "I had health insurance, and it was wonderful."

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StoryCorps
3:05 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Sisterly Love: 'I Knew That We Had Each Other'

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:56 am

Ten days after a court verdict found a man guilty of sexual assault, two of his victims — his 14- and 15-year-old nieces — stepped into a StoryCorps booth.

"He was a police officer," the older sister said. "This big SWAT man with all the badges and the uniforms, and he couldn't keep his hands to himself. He sexually assaulted me when no one was around. I felt like I was on pause my whole childhood. A prisoner — dead. And I didn't say a word to anybody for seven years."

Audio produced for Morning Edition by Katie Simon with Jud Esty-Kendall.

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All Tech Considered
3:04 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Third-Graders React To Video Games Tracking Their Play

Ms. James' class at St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School in Washington, D.C. wrote in to Morning Edition with their reactions to a story.
Courtesy of Mary Beth James

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:17 am

Last week, as part of our kids and technology theme week, Steve Henn wrote about how video game makers are spending more time and money tracking players' behavior.

"As we play games, game designers are running tests on us and our kids. They're asking themselves what can they tweak to make us play just a bit longer," Henn wrote.

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9:25 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Michigan Supreme Court to hear "juvenile lifers" case

Lead in text: 
State's highest court could decide issue of sentencing relief
LANSING, MI -- Michigan's highest court may decide whether more than 360 prisoners serving life sentences for violent crimes they committed as minors deserve a chance at eventual release. The Michigan Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to hear oral arguments in three cases questioning whether so-called "juvenile lifers" deserve sentencing relief.
Culture & Music
9:04 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Native drum helps bring community together

Native American group Southern Straight's performance at the Kalamazoo Public Library in 2009. Southern Straight is an earlier incarnation of Sons of Three Fires.
Credit Kalamazoo Public Library

“You’re singing your best. You’re singing your hardest. You’re not being shy or holding back anything because somebody might look at you,” says John Bush of Sons of Three Fires describing what he tries to achieve as a singer.

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7:20 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

State House approves bill limiting bridge card use

Lead in text: 
Portage Republican Representative Margaret O'Brien says legislation is intended to cut down on "abuse to our welfare system"
LANSING -- The Michigan Legislature now has to choose between a pair of dueling proposals with the same goal -- preventing Bridge Card recipients from using ATMs at liquor stores, strip clubs and racetracks to access cash benefits.

Karen Feagins joined WJCT in 2005, and has worked in many different roles at the station in both radio and television. Her love of journalism and storytelling began in the 4th grade when she was named editor of the newspaper at her elementary school in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. Karen attended the University of Missouri to study Broadcast Journalism, and spent several years as a commercial television news reporter before finding her home in public broadcasting. She is now news director and head of radio programming WJCT, and assists with the production of "First Coast Connect."

Politics
6:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How Kennedy's Assassination Changed The Secret Service

The limousine carrying President John F. Kennedy races toward the hospital after he was shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, with Secret Service agent Clint Hill riding on the back.
Justin Newman AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:45 am

Nov. 22 will mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, a moment that left an indelible mark on those who remember it.

It also permanently changed the agency charged with protecting the president — the U.S. Secret Service.

Looking back at the images of Kennedy, first lady Jackie Kennedy, Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife waving as they rode through the streets of Dallas in an open Lincoln, it all looks terribly innocent and naive.

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The Salt
6:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How 17th Century Fraud Gave Rise To Bright Orange Cheese

Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene.
Courtesy of A. Blake Gardner

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 9:46 am

The news from Kraft last week that the company is ditching two artificial dyes in some versions of its macaroni and cheese products left me with a question.

Why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turns out there's a curious history here.

In theory, cheese should be whitish — similar to the color of milk, right?

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Around the Nation
6:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

School Named For Former KKK Leader Reconsiders Its Legacy

Nathan Bedford Forrest served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The high school that bears his name, now majority African-American, has been at the center of controversy for decades.
Mike Wintroath AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 8:41 pm

Duval County Public Schools is considering a name change for Nathan Bedford Forrest High School in Jacksonville, Fla. The school is named for a Confederate hero who was the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan — and after five decades of debate, there appears to be momentum for change.

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Book Reviews
5:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Inspired By History, A Novelist Writes Of Jewish South Africa

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

Roughly three-quarters of South Africa's Jewish population are descendants of Lithuanian immigrants. Of these peasants, townspeople, tradesmen, shopkeepers and intellectuals who fled centuries of persecution and embarked on a passage to Africa, many dreamed of a new land and the promise of new beginnings. Kenneth Bonert's ancestors were part of this diaspora. In his debut novel, written in language as dense and varied as the South African landscape he describes, Bonert delivers a taut, visceral account of a young Jewish boy's African life.

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Around the Nation
5:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Trim Recess? Some Schools Hold On To Child's Play

Students play tag at Ruby Bridges Elementary in Alameda, Calif. The school has expanded recess time with help from the nonprofit group Playworks.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

It's recess time at Ruby Bridges Elementary School and a third-grader is pummeling a plastic tetherball with focused intensity. He's playing at one of more than a half-dozen recess play stations on the school's sprawling cement playground — there's also wall ball, basketball, capture the flag, sharks and minnows, a jungle gym and tag.

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Code Switch
5:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Striking Harmonies With The Jubilee Singers' Past And Present

Soprano Nigia Hunt is a junior at Durham School of the Arts. She and others are singing for Paul Kwami, auditioning for a solo in the Duke Performances concert.
Leoneda Inge/NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

The Fisk Jubilee Singers are known worldwide for their flawless voices and stellar performances of Negro spirituals. They're from Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn., but they travel around the world to perform their music. Negro spirituals were originally sung by slaves and remain tightly linked to African-American culture. Paul Kwami, the choir's musical director, said singing these spirituals was a way for slaves to lament their servitude, along with the hope of being free one day.

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Author Interviews
3:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Roy Choi's Tacos Channel LA And The Immigrant Experience

Chef Roy Choi was named Food and Wine Magazine's Best New Chef in 2010.
Bobby Fisher Courtesy of Harper Collins

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:24 pm

Roy Choi is a chef who's celebrated for food that isn't fancy. He's one of the founders of the food truck movement, where instead of hot dogs or ice cream, more unusual, gourmet dishes are prepared and sold. His Kogi trucks specialize in tacos filled with Korean barbecue.

Choi was born in South Korea in 1970 and moved to Los Angeles with his parents at the age of 2. His parents owned a Korean restaurant near Anaheim for a few years when he was a child. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that his mother had some serious cooking talent.

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The Salt
3:48 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

FDA Moves To Phase Out Remaining Trans Fats In Food Supply

Crisco was the original product made with partially hydrogenated soybean oil, which contains trans fats. Today, Crisco has only small amounts of the fats.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

If the Food and Drug Administration has its way, an era of food technology will soon end. The agency announced Thursday it is aiming to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products.

Margaret Hamburg, the FDA commissioner, said at a press conference that her agency has come to the preliminary conclusion that the oils "are not generally recognized as safe for use in food."

If the agency makes this decision final, it will mean a complete ban on this ingredient.

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Book Reviews
3:04 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Self-Help Messiah' Dale Carnegie Gets A Second Life In Print

Courtesy of Other Press

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:50 pm

"Make the other person feel important." "Let the other fellow feel that the idea is his." "Make people like you." Those are some of the peppy commands that have sent generations of Americans out into the world, determined to win friends and influence people — oh, and make big bucks.

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Parallels
1:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Who Owns The Archives Of A Vanishing Iraqi Jewish World?

This colorfully illustrated French and Hebrew Passover Haggadah was published in Vienna in 1930. Caption on the image: "Eating Matzah." This restored document is part of an exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., that opens Nov. 8.
National Archives

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:22 pm

When U.S. troops entered the basement of Saddam Hussein's secret police building in Baghdad a decade ago, they were looking for weapons of mass destruction. They didn't find any.

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1:20 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Democrats say 130,000 in Michigan will lose unemployment benefits without extension

Lead in text: 
Republicans argue program costs too much
Nearly 44,000 people in Michigan will lose unemployment benefits in late December if Congress doesnt extend emergency benefits, while another 86,500 people in Michigan would lose benefits by June 2014, according to a Thursday report. The House Ways and Means Committees Democrats said an estimated 1.3 million Americans nationwide will lose benefits the week of Dec.
12:35 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Panera Bread union and owners to meet

Lead in text: 
Labor dispute has been complicated by U.S. Supreme Court case and Michigan's new "right to work" law
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Almost 20 months after Panera Bread bakers in Southwest Michigan voted to form the chain's first union in the United States, they are expected to sit down with their employer at the bargaining table Thursday.
Parallels
12:10 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

In Libya, The Militias Rule While Government Founders

Militias from towns throughout the country's west parade through Tripoli, Libya, in 2012. Analysts say the country is awash with heavy weapons in the hands of militias divided by tribe, ideology and region. The central government has little power over the gunmen.
Abdel Magid Al Fergany AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:51 pm

Zintan, a mountain town in northwestern Libya, is a place of gray and brown buildings, with little infrastructure, about 50,000 people and no central government control.

The Libyan government doesn't provide basic services, not even water. People use wells to provide for themselves. The local council runs all of Zintan's affairs out of a building in the center of town.

At the local militia base on the outskirts of town, we meet the keeper of Saif el-Islam Gadhafi, the son and one-time heir apparent of Moammar Gadhafi.

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NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Congolese Rebels Put Down Arms, But Will Another Group Rise Up?

The Congolese rebel group M-23 is has been condemned for its years of brutal violence against civilians. But now, they've vowed to lay down their weapons. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the issue with NPR's Eastern Africa correspondent Gregory Warner.

NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Doctor In Eastern Congo: 'Not Normal To Be Attacked'

The eastern Congo is known to some as the 'rape capital of the world' because nearly 50 women are raped there every hour. Dr. Denis Mukwege, a gynecologist, has put his practice, and his life on the line, to help save these women. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with him about his work.

NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Typing Love Letters To St. Louis

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is actually on her way to St. Louis Public Radio. Coming up, we'll take a look at the Arab Spring through street art, paintings and photographs. We'll hear from the curator and a featured artist from a new exhibit at the Arab American National Museum. But first, as I just mentioned, TELL ME MORE is taking the show to St. Louis tomorrow.

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NPR Story
11:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Art Revolution Blooms After Arab Spring

A painter uses his brush against a policeman armed with a mace. This mural is at the intersection of Muhammad Mahmud Street and Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt.
Mona Abaza

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:10 pm

In the U.S., graffiti is often condemned as vandalism. But during the Arab Spring, artists say city walls were often the only places where they could talk back to tyrants.

Street art can be found across the Middle East and North Africa, and the Arab Spring protests inspired an artistic revolution. The "Creative Dissent" exhibit at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan is putting that art on display.

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Business
10:10 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Twitter Makes Market Debut

The New York Stock Exchange is at the center of attention Thursday morning as Twitter goes public at $26 per share. That means company is expected to raise almost $2 billion. For the latest on this highly anticipated IPO, NPR's Zoe Chace talks with host David Greene.

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