Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

How A Massive Power Outage Sent People Out In The Street

The New York City skyline is mostly dark in this photo of the 2003 blackout that hit U.S. and Canadian cities.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:38 pm

On Aug. 14, 2003, a series of cascading power failures led to a blackout that spread across the Northeast and as far west as Ohio. Some 50 million people were affected, and the power outages lasted up to 31 hours.

New York City was especially hard hit as the skyline went dark, and its 8 million residents coped without traffic lights or subways. We'll be exploring the lessons learned in the week ahead, but reporter Beth Fertig of member station WNYC reminds us what happened in her city.

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Media
5:50 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

The Tricky Business Of Predicting Where Media Will Go Next

On Monday, the Washington Post Co. announced the sale of its newspaper to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, a move that comes as the paper struggles to keep up revenue.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

What's next for The Washington Post? With a new owner, the paper is stepping into a new era. Its path may lead to the ever-evolving future of journalism.

"There is no map, and charting a path ahead will not be easy," said Amazon founder Jeff Bezos with the announcement of his purchase Monday. "We will need to invent, which means we will need to experiment."

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Movie Interviews
5:50 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

'Lovelace': A Sex Superstar's Struggle To Show Herself

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, we have a remembrance of actress Karen Black who made a name for herself in Hollywood during the 1960s and '70s. First, though, we turn to the silver screen for a look at another actress of the 1970s, Linda Lovelace.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Florida's Highwaymen Painted Idealized Landscapes In Jim Crow South

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

In the winter of 2012, I came across a story on a drive through central coastal Florida in the town of Fort Pierce. Route 1 is now dominated by strip malls and fading condos, but the Florida of the 1950s and '60s was a candy-colored Eisenhower, Kennedy space-age dream of flaming red Poinciana trees and untamed beaches.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Technology's Role In Romance Dates To The Telegraph

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CATFISH")

NEV: A couple of years ago, I fell in love online. Turns out my crush wasn't who I thought she was. I was heartbroken.

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

The MTV show "Catfish" looks into the anonymous world of online dating. It's a phenomenon in the news this year.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS SHOW)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Straight ahead, navigating the world of online dating. How to avoid getting hooked through a hoax.

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

Audio As Art At New York Exhibit

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:26 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF ARPEGGIO)

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Arpeggios ricochet through three speakers and envelop us. We're on the modernist Bauhaus staircase at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, listening to techno-inspired electronica. This piece is part of a new exhibit, "Soundings: A Contemporary Score," that opens today.

BARBARA LONDON: I wanted work that pushed limits, pushed boundaries.

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Digital Life
12:24 pm
Sat August 10, 2013

TED Radio Hour: The Hackers

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Time now for an idea worth spreading from the TED Radio Hour. What if there were a way to hack into your brain and make your life better. Neurosurgeon Andres Lozano is doing just that. He told host Guy Raz how.

DR. ANDRES LOZANO: We are able to adjust the activity of circuits in the brain by using electricity...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Bob Odenkirk, 'Love Affairs' And 'In A World ...'

Bob Odenkirk plays sleazeball lawyer Saul Goodman on AMC's Breaking Bad. The show is in its final season, but creator Vince Gilligan has talked about doing a spinoff series for Saul that would star Odenkirk.
Ursula Coyote AMC

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 11:44 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Commentary
8:21 am
Sat August 10, 2013

The Doctor, An Utterly Millennial Hero

BBC

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

The selection last week of actor Peter Capaldi to play the latest Doctor on Doctor Who has made headlines all over the world — and you'd be forgiven for wondering why. It's only a TV show, after all, and it's a sometimes cheesy, often over-the-top sci-fi feature, not 60 Minutes or The West Wing.

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NPR Story
7:22 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Detroit's Uneasy Relations With Michigan

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee.

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NPR Story
7:22 am
Sat August 10, 2013

A Taste Of The Future Of Food

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab-grown burger. The test-tube piece of meat took three months and cost more than $300,000 to grow, but its makers hope the experiment might help feed the world someday.

It's Morgaine Gaye's job to think about what we'll be eating in the future. She's a food futurologist, and she joins me now from our London bureau and she joins me now from our London bureau. Welcome.

DR. MORGAINE GAYE: Hello there.

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NPR Story
7:22 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Small-Market Teams Leading MLB Standings

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

HEADLEE: We are rounding the corner toward Major League Baseball's homestretch. Some surprising names are up near the top of the standings: Pirates, Royals, Orioles all contending this year. They have a collective zero World Series titles since 1985 and it's not really a surprise. But I can't get through a sports interview without mentioning, of course, the beloved Detroit Tigers. They're in first place in the American League.

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Television
5:43 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Murder, Secrets And Lies By The Seaside In 'Broadchurch'

David Tennant plays Detective Inspector Alec Hardy alongside Olivia Colman as Detective Sergeant Ellie Miller, investigating the murder of a young boy in the BBC crime drama Broadchurch.
BBC

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

During the opening scene of Broadchurch, a new drama on BBC America, the camera lingers on a sign that reads "Love Thy Neighbour." But it must be pretty hard to 'love thy neighbor' when you know there's a murderer in your midst.

Broadchurch is also the fictional name of the idyllic looking English seaside town where the show is set. From afar, it looks like the perfect vacation spot — but up close the picture is quite different.

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National Security
5:09 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Kerry, Hagel Aim To Ease U.S.-Russian Tensions

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, left, and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, right, walk to their news conference at the Russian Embassy in Washington on Friday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel met with their Russian counterparts for talks in Washington on Friday, aiming to repair strained relations with Moscow.

President Obama snubbed Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday when he called off plans to go to Moscow next month for a one-on-one summit. He was reacting to Russia's offer of temporary asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

But on Friday, the diplomats seemed eager to show that the dispute is not some new sort of cold war.

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Food
4:51 am
Sat August 10, 2013

Pack A Pie For Your Picnic, Right In Your Hot Little Hand

Baker Kim Boyce's hand pies can be filled with a variety of fruits, from apricots to blackberries. The fruit's natural sugars and juices caramelize while baking, concentrating the summer flavors.
Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:43 am

Late summer is high season for delicious, juicy fruits, from Georgia peaches to Maine blueberries. Naturally, that gets many bakers thinking pie. But taking a big, drippy pie on a picnic can be a pretty sloppy prospect.

Kim Boyce, a baker in Portland, Ore., has solved this problem. For picnics, she bakes up hand pies: Sturdy little fruit-filled turnovers that don't require a knife and fork. Boyce makes 60 or 70 a day at her bakery.

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Book Reviews
6:59 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Party Like It's 2009: Life And Friendship In The Great Recession

Choire Sicha co-runs the website The Awl. Very Recent History is his first book.
Jonathan Snyder

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:23 pm

In Choire Sicha's Very Recent History: An Entirely Factual Account of a Year (c. AD 2009) in a Large City, a voice from our future looks back at events taking place in a "massive" East Coast metropolis, its citizens perpetually gripped with "a quiet panic" while living in a gritty landscape of iron and excess. Throw in a mysterious virus, a rich, blind governor, a sketchy mayor campaigning for a third term, and this novel gets even more curious.

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The Salt
6:19 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Did Tyson Ban Doping Cows With Zilmax To Boost Foreign Sales?

A pen at a feedlot in central Kansas that houses 30,000 cattle. Feedlots are where cattle are "finished" before slaughter, often with the use of growth-promoting drugs like zilpaterol.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 6:36 pm

Tyson Foods Inc. announced this week that it would soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is the battle for sales in other countries, where certain drugs that make livestock grow faster are banned.

"I really do think this is more of a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners," says Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

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Remembrances
4:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Jack Clement Worked With Some Of Country Music's Best

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:45 pm

We remember recording producer Cowboy Jack Clements, who died Thursday in Nashville at the age of 82. In the 1950s, he helped record Elvis, Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison when he worked at Sun Records in Memphis. He also discovered Jerry Lee Lewis and began a life-long friendship with Johnny Cash. Clement later provided the signature sound to one of Cash's biggest hits, "Ring of Fire."

Africa
4:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

As Ramadan Winds Down, Tensions Ramp Up In Egypt

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:45 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. In Egypt, the country's Muslims are marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, celebrating with family and friends. But not everyone is home enjoying the holiday. Tens of thousands of protesters are still in the streets mainly camped out in two locations in Cairo.

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Iraq
4:24 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

July Was Iraq's Deadliest Month In Five Years

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 5:45 pm

Melissa Block talks to Tim Arango, Baghdad bureau chief for The New York Times, about increasing violence in Iraq.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:07 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Jon Miller

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 12:03 pm

The voice of the San Francisco Giants tries to win our game.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:07 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Nic Wallenda

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR news quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. And once again here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Thanks so much.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: There are a lot of different kinds of pastimes and games, so there's some debate over what actually is a sport and what isn't. Here's my definition. A sport is anything I am scared to attempt.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:07 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Abby Wambach

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 12:03 pm

The soccer star proves she has her head in the game.

Planet Money
2:42 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

The Raisin Outlaw Of Kerman, Calif.

Raisin farmer Marvin Horne stands in a field of grapevines planted next to his home.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 9:39 pm

Meet Marvin Horne, raisin farmer. Horne has been farming raisins on a vineyard in Kerman, Calif., for decades. But a couple of years ago, he did something that made a lot of the other raisin farmers out here in California really angry. So angry that they hired a private investigator to spy on Horne and his wife, Laura. Agents from a detective agency spent hours sitting outside the Hornes' farm recording video of trucks entering and leaving the property.

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1:31 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

One South Haven beach reopens

Lead in text: 
The problem was caused by high levels of E. coli bacteria following recent heavy rains.
SOUTH HAVEN, MI -- North Beach has been re-opened to water activities after E. coli testing Friday, while South Beach is still under a no body contact advisory. Both beaches were closed to swimming and water activities Thursday due to tests by by the Van Buren/Cass County District Public Health Department showing high E.
1:20 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Fake coyotes scare birds at Kalamazoo airport

Lead in text: 
The airport uses animated coyote decoys to scare away Canada geese that can pose a threat to aircraft landing or taking off.
KALAMAZOO, MI - The snarling, crouching coyotes seen lurking about the Kalamazoo Battle Creek International Airport this summer still startle the employees- even though they know the animals are only decoys, relocated by operations staff every day or two to keep small animals and large birds away from the airport runways.
1:11 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Meteor shower to light up the weekend

Lead in text: 
The Perseid shower is expected to reach peak intensity on Sunday and Monday nights.
Put out the lawn chair, set the alarm and maybe bring something to wet your whistle while you gaze into the nighttime sky - the year's best shooting star show has started. August's annual Perseids meteor shower peaks Sunday and Monday, promising perhaps 70 meteors an hour those evenings.
1:00 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Judge: No charges in Bolger election case

Lead in text: 
The case involved Schmidt's switching parties in 2012 and the recruitment of a "sham" Democrat to run against him. Bolger later apologized for his role in the affair but said he didn't break the law.
LANSING - An Ingham County judge has wrapped up a grand jury investigation into an election scandal without bringing charges against House Speaker Jase Bolger or Grand Rapids State Rep. Roy Schmidt. "An indictment is not warranted," due to a lack of evidence of a crime or wrongdoing, Ingham County Circuit Judge Rosemarie Aquilina said in an order today.
Parallels
12:36 pm
Fri August 9, 2013

Rome's New Mayor Wants The Monuments Pedestrian Friendly

Tightrope walker Andrea Loreni performs in front of the Coliseum in Rome on Saturday. Rome's new mayor is on a crusade to make the ancient monuments more pedestrian friendly, and the city held an all-night street party as it permanently blocked off part of the main road running past the Coliseum.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 9:38 pm

On the first Saturday of August, a funny thing happened to 150,000 people on their way to the Roman Forum.

While a pianist and sax player set the mood, people looked upward and watched anxiously as acrobat Andrea Loreni made his way slowly on a tightrope stretched across Via dei Fori Imperiali, the wide avenue flanking the Forum and leading to the Coliseum.

The acrobat's walk was meant as a metaphor, a bridge reuniting ancient squares.

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Television
11:54 am
Fri August 9, 2013

A 'Curb'-Like Comedy And The Return Of 'Breaking Bad'

Before the midseason break, Breaking Bad's Walter White (Bryan Cranston) had stashed away plenty of drug money, but may have inadvertently tipped off his DEA agent brother-in-law.
Ursula Coyote AMC

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:55 pm

This weekend, the AMC cable network begins showing the final episodes of its acclaimed drama series Breaking Bad, and launches a new one: Low Winter Sun. Meanwhile, HBO presents its newest made-for-TV movie — this one a comedy, starring and co-written by Larry David.

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