Gene Demby is the lead blogger for NPR's Code Switch team.

Before coming to NPR, he served as the managing editor for Huffington Post's BlackVoices following its launch. He later covered politics.

Prior to that role he spent six years in various positions at The New York Times. While working for the Times in 2007, he started a blog about race, culture, politics and media called PostBourgie, which won the 2009 Black Weblog Award for Best News/Politics Site.

Demby is an avid runner, mainly because he wants to stay alive long enough to finally see the Sixers and Eagles win championships in their respective sports. You can follow him on Twitter at @GeeDee215.

Code Switch
5:54 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

For a Stop-And-Frisk Plaintiff, A 'Heartbreaking' Birthday

Nicholas Peart, far left, was stopped by police on his 18th birthday.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 1:54 pm

Not long ago, we wrote about The Talk, the conversation that many young men of color get from their parents about how to manage being seen as suspicious and navigate fraught encounters with police officers. It's why Nicholas Peart's story resonated with us. Peart, who lives in Harlem, was one of the plaintiffs in New York City's big stop-and-frisk case.

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All Tech Considered
5:44 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Hacking Real Things Becomes Child's Play At This Camp

Owen Chilcoat hacking his tablet. "I am just messing around ... trying to break it," he says.
Steve Henn NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 8:56 am

At r00tz, a camp that takes place each year during the Def Con convention in Las Vegas, children learn to pick locks, hack smart TVs and, most important, how to take apart and understand the technology that surrounds them.

The scene inside the camp a couple weeks ago was a bit of a madhouse — controlled chaos. Little kids everywhere. Brendan Herman was trying to program a machine to draw pictures on ping-pong balls, wearing a tinfoil hat.

"To protect me from aliens," he said.

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Dave DeWitt is currently working on the year-long North Carolina Teacher Project. He came to WUNC in 2003 and spent four years on the staff of The State of Things.

Middle East
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Sinai Peninsula Sees Increasing Violence Since Morsi Takeover

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:22 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In 2011, when demonstrators took to the streets of Cairo in peaceful protest against then-President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians in the Sinai Peninsula staged attacks on police stations. And while Cairo is still the scene of political conflict, in the Sinai, the conflict remains extremely violent.

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Law
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Brand New N.C. Voter ID Law Already Facing Challenges

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Voting rights advocates are focusing their sights on North Carolina. The ACLU and the NAACP filed lawsuits challenging the state's new voting rules just minutes after Governor Pat McCrory signed the bill into law yesterday.

Dave DeWitt of North Carolina Public Radio reports the new law does more than merely require voters to show an ID at the polls.

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Health Care
4:34 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Obama Delays Implementing Another Part Of Affordable Care Act

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:31 pm

The Obama administration has delayed implementation of another part of Affordable Care Act — this time, it's the rules aimed at limiting out-of-pocket costs for patients.

Ecstatic Voices
4:06 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Life As Prayer: The Singing Nuns Of Ann Arbor

Sister Joseph Andrew Bogdanowicz (right), vicaress general and music director for Dominican Sisters of Mary. On the group's new album, she plays organ and composed three selections.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:31 pm

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WMUK News
4:00 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Could you get by on $4 a day?

Temeka Williams, right, of Detroit, uses her Bridge card tokens at the Farmer's Market in Detroit in 2010.
Credit AP Images

In 2012, nearly 67,000 people in Kalamazoo County needed “food stamps” to get by. A week-long program called the “SNAP Challenge” is underway to draw public attention to the service known in Michigan as the “Bridge card”. 

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Parenting
1:54 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Child Safety: Stranger Danger Warning Needs Updating

'Stranger Danger' used to be the mantra parents taught their kids to keep them safe. But now we're learning that strangers aren't the main problem - children are usually harmed by people they already know. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks child safety with a roundtable of experts and parents.

Health Care
1:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Explaining Health Care Exchanges

If health care exchanges have you confused, you're not alone. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks to health reporter Mary Agnes Carey about the next phase of the Affordable Care Act.

Around the Nation
1:51 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Not Take That Marriage Out For A Test Ride?

With so many marriages ending in divorce today, some people wonder if the legal definition of marriage needs updating. One lawyer, Paul Rampell, says maybe it's time to consider 'leasing' your marriage - with the option to renew. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks to Rampell about his idea.

1:08 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Douglass Community Association to hold forum

Lead in text: 
The Douglas Community Association is hosting a Community Forum on August 19 at 6 p.m. in order to address concerns and provide information about the current status of the organization. In July the United Way cut funding for the DCA. The organization issued a press release regarding the cutting of funding for the Douglas Community Center that said they must remain fiscally responsible to the communities that rely on their services.
"Regrettably, the situation has reached a point at which United Way believes that it cannot, in good conscience and good stewardship, continue to provide funding to the Douglass Community Association," said Michael Larson, CEO and president of United Way of the Battle Creek and Kalamazoo Region.
Television
12:39 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

'Orange' Creator Jenji Kohan: 'Piper Was My Trojan Horse'

Jenji Kohan, seen here on the set of Orange Is the New Black, began her writing career on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.
Ursula Coyote Netflix

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:32 pm

A lot of people have been binge-watching the new Netflix series Orange Is the New Black, which is set in a minimum security women's prison.

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Music Reviews
12:39 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Valerie June Wants To Be On Your Mind

Valerie June.
Susan Riddle Duke Photography Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:32 pm

Valerie June wants to be on your mind; to get inside your head. She writes or co-writes songs that mix blues, gospel, folk and soul, and which describe emotional isolation, financial deprivation and insecurity about her place in the world. She's unafraid to proclaim her neediness — perhaps because, possessed of a powerful voice, she knows that her vulnerability isn't likely to come off as passive or self-pitying on Pushin' Against a Stone.

Read more
12:22 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Yucca Mountain nuke waste study back on

Lead in text: 
The site in Nevada could become the destination for highly rasioactive spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors like the one at Palisades near South Haven.
The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals said today that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission must resume its long-slumbering review of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste storage project, which the Obama administration and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid have labored for years to kill. “[U]nless and until Congress authoritatively says otherwise or there...
Rep. Jase Bolger
8:49 am
Tue August 13, 2013

WestSouthwest: State House Speaker Jase Bolger

Jase Bolger
Credit WMUK

State House Speaker Jase Bolger sat down just days after an Ingham County Judge found no evidence of criminal activity related to a party-switch last year. 

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Around the Nation
7:35 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Ohio Casino Acknowledges Mistake, Awards 2 Winners

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Our next millionaire is Kevin Lewis. That's what Kevin Lewis of Cincinnati, Ohio heard last Saturday night while visiting the Horseshoe Casino in Cleveland. He'd won a $1 million giveaway. He was shocked. He was thrilled.

And he was the wrong Kevin Lewis from Cincinnati, something casino officials only realized as he was accepting his prize. It was our blunder, they said, so both Kevin Lewises get to keep their $1 million prizes. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:19 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Atlanta Braves Find Another Use For Duct Tape

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

The baseball helmet is meant to protect players. But it's increasingly becoming a problem for Atlanta Braves third baseman Chris Johnson. For the second time in two seasons, Johnson was ejected from a game after arguing with an umpire and throwing his helmet. Next game, Johnson hit the field with a new piece of equipment: duct tape over his mouth. The Braves need Johnson in the game. He's leading the league in batting and so the team hopes this new strategy sticks.

6:56 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Harper Schools approves virtual program designed to help kids who "miss out" on diploma

Lead in text: 
30 to 40 students are expected to use the program over the coming year
Harper Creek Community Schools on Monday approved a new virtual program meant to capture kids who "disappear" and miss out on a high school diploma. The Harper Board of Education voted 6-0, with Trustee Jackie LaFever absent, to authorize Superintendent John Severson to apply to the state for a seat-time waiver that would allow the district to receive per-pupil revenue for kids outside of a traditional classroom.
6:51 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Saint Joseph seeks to preserve lighthouses

Lead in text: 
Estimated cost is $1.8-million
ST. JOSEPH - St. Joseph hasn't even taken possession of its historic lighthouses yet, and people are already volunteering to help restore them.
6:47 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Task force proposal would limit noise from downtown Kalamazoo venues by time of day

Lead in text: 
Louder decibel limits would be allowed late at nights, on weekends
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- A task force established to study downtown noise and propose regulations to the Kalamazoo City Commission laid the framework for a recommendation Monday. Guidelines established Monday would allow downtown Kalamazoo venues, including the Arcadia Creek Festival Place, to have certain levels of sound based on the time of day.
Business
5:28 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Modern Latinas Are A Challenge To Marketers

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Hispanic American are an increasingly important consumer demographic to woo. That's according to a new study from the market research firm Nielsen. The report says that most of today's Latinas are the primary decision makers when it comes to household spending.

But marketing to them is a real challenge, as NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji reports.

SHEREEN MARISOL MERAJI, BYLINE: Welcome to the home of the contemporary Latina consumer.

PAMELA MARIA WRIGHT: Hi.

MERAJI: Hi. How are you?

Good. How are you?

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Law
5:17 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Holder Unveils New Approach To Criminal Justice

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the Obama administration is trying to reduce prison time for some people convicted of less serious crimes. Attorney General Eric Holder outlined a new approach to criminal justice yesterday in a speech to the American Bar Association in San Francisco. He's targeting what he says is expensive and racially biased overcrowding in American prisons.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC HOLDER: Too many Americans go to too many prisons, for far too long, and for no truly good law enforcement reason.

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Shots - Health News
4:07 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Obamacare: People With Disabilities Face Complex Choices

Speech-language pathologists Jill Tullman (left) and Mendi Carroll (right) work with Bryce Vernon at Talking with Technology Camp in Empire, Colo., on July 25.
Kristen Kidd KCFR News

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

The Affordable Care Act has set new standards — called essential health benefits — outlining what health insurance companies must now cover. But there's a catch: Insurance firms can still pick and choose, to some degree, which specific therapies they'll cover within some categories of benefit.

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All Tech Considered
3:03 am
Tue August 13, 2013

A Closer Look At Elon Musk's Much-Hyped Hyperloop

A rendering of a Hyperloop pod.
Courtesy of Elon Musk

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

You can thank brainy billionaire Elon Musk's Hyperloop proposal for bringing electro-magnetic-powered transportation and the linear induction motor back into the public consciousness.

The Hyperloop is a system for really-really rapid transit. If built, Musk claims it can carry people about 800 miles per hour, which could get you from Los Angeles to San Francisco in about 30 minutes.

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The Salt
3:02 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Colorado Vault Is Fort Knox For The World's Seeds

Dave Dierig, research leader at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, stands among the ceiling-high shelves that hold the 600,000 seed packets in this cold storage vault.
Grace Hood KUNC

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

When unapproved genetically modified wheat was found growing in Oregon earlier this year, it didn't take long for accusations to start flying. A flurry of initial finger-pointing cast potential blame on a federal seed vault in Fort Collins, Colo., which housed the same strain of wheat, developed by Monsanto Corp., for about seven years up until late 2011.

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U.S.
3:01 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Of Bison, Birth Control And An Island Off Southern Calif.

Bison have been roaming the Santa Catalina Island since the 1920s. At one time they numbered more than 600.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

In an open-aired Jeep, it's a bone-jarring ride into Santa Catalina Island's vast interior. The dirt road winds and climbs, twists and turns, climbing 2,000 feet up.

From there, the deep blue of the Pacific Ocean comes back into view, and if you squint, you can see downtown Los Angeles 30 miles off on the horizon.

Some days, you can also see wild bison.

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The Record
12:03 am
Tue August 13, 2013

The White Mandingos: Music That Defies Definition

The White Mandingos are, from left, Sacha Jenkins, Murs and Darryl Jenifer.
Courtesy of Biz 3 Publicity

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

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9:40 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Republican state lawmakers call for alternatives to Medicaid expansion plan

Lead in text: 
Michigan Senate has three different proposals to consider later this month
Lansing - Two Republican state lawmakers were joined by other Medicaid expansion critics Monday in attacking the federal Affordable Care Act and urging rejection of a proposed expansion of the government health care coverage program for the poor in favor of their free-market alternative. Sen. Patrick Colbeck, R-Canton, and Rep.

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