9:56 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commissioner says Douglass Community Association trying to raise $100,000 in month

Lead in text: 
Community forum scheduled for August 19th
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- A grassroots campaign has started to help the Douglass Community Association raise $100,000 in 30 days as the organization faces a funding deadline, Kalamazoo City Commissioner Stephanie Moore said. Moore said a grassroots campaign has started with an effort to raise $100,000 to help the organization "bridge a funding gap."
Animals
7:18 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Researchers Focus On Sharks' Point Of View

The term "shark attack" is under attack by the leading society of shark researchers. They're calling on the media to stop labeling any sort of interaction with humans as an "attack." They suggest using specific terms like: shark sightings and shark encounters.

7:10 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Texas Township man gets probation ordered to pay restitution for storing toxic barrels on property

Lead in text: 
More than 500 barrels were found on Donald Haugen's property in 2008 after a pole barn fire
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- He'€™ll spend no time in jail, but a Texas Township man who stored hundreds of barrels of toxic substances on his property was ordered Monday to serve five years of probation and to pay $2.7 million in restitution for the chemical cleanup that came following a 2008 pole-barn fire.
Around the Nation
7:10 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Indy Car Driver Tagliani Loses Bet To Dixon

Alex Tagliani is a winner on the race track, but he lost a bet to fellow driver Scott Dixon on who could raise more money for charity. Loser Tagliani had to ride a tricycle and milk a cow while dressed in a beaver costume at the Indiana State Fair.

6:57 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Benton Harbor income tax will be on November ballot

Lead in text: 
Voters will be asked to impose 1% tax on residents and corporations and .5% tax on non-residents who work in city
BENTON HARBOR - Applause exploded in the standing-room-only audience after the Benton Harbor City Commission approved the city income tax ordinance 6-2 with one abstention. City voters will decide whether to impose the tax.
Legislative districts
6:40 am
Tue August 6, 2013

McCann: Still plenty of time for redistricting proposal

Sean McCann
Credit WMUK

State Representative Sean McCann on redistricting

    

State Representative Sean McCann says the fairness of having an independent commission draw legislative districts should have bipartisan appeal. 

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Author Interviews
6:07 am
Tue August 6, 2013

2012 Election Was 'Collision' Between Two Americas

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 4:05 pm

Dan Balz, one of the nation's most respected political reporters, has written his review of the last presidential election — what happened and why.

It's called Collision 2012: Obama vs. Romney and the Future of Elections in America.

The chief correspondent for The Washington Post, Balz is the author of several books, including one on President Obama's first election — The Battle for America 2008: The Story of an Extraordinary Election — written with Haynes Johnson.

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National Security
6:06 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Intercepted Al-Qaida Communication Prompts Warnings

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Sports
5:36 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Baseball Fans Divided Over Drug Suspensions

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

Major League Baseball has suspended 13 players for violating the league's drug policy. New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez was suspended for more than 200 games, until the end of next season.

Sports
5:36 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Major League Baseball Works To Win Fans' Trust

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

So now the challenge for Major League Baseball: Winning back the trust of fans. The suspensions themselves were a start but there is a wrinkle because, as we've heard, Alex Rodriguez is appealing his 211-game ban. It means the narrative in baseball will continue to be about suspicions rather than the play on the field.

Joining us now to talk about the league and its efforts is NPR's Mike Pesca. Good morning, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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Business
5:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

GM Looks To China To Boost Car Sales

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

General Motors is selling a lot of cars in China. The company set a sales record there in July.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports China is in the front line in the battle for automotive global dominance.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: In China this year, forecasters predict nearly 20 million cars will be sold. In the U.S., the bet is we'll sell about 15 and a half million.

Mike Wall is with IHS Automotive.

MILE WALL: Yeah, you really can't overstate the importance of China in the overall global automotive landscape.

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Business
5:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Study: Glass Ceiling True For Female White Collar Criminals

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:04 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Today's Last Word In Business is criminal glass ceiling. A new study suggests that female white collar crooks face the same barriers as their law-abiding counterparts in the corporate world.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A team of researchers from Penn State studied the involvement of women in recent corporate fraud cases. It found women held inferior positions in criminal conspiracies, and profited significantly less from their misdeeds.

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Art & Design
5:02 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Art In Context: Venice Biennale Looks Past Pop Culture

The Angolan exhibit consists of tall stacks of large photographic posters by artist Edson Chagas. The country, which is exhibiting at Venice for the first time, won the Golden Lion award for best national pavilion.
Courtesy of www.beyondentrophy.com

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:56 am

Every two years for over a century, lovers of contemporary art convene in Venice for the oldest and largest noncommercial art exhibition in the world.

The Venice Biennale has none of the glitz and conspicuous consumption of art auctions in London and New York. Instead, it's a dizzying and eclectic array of sights by both celebrity artists and total unknowns.

This year's works are not just paintings, sculptures and installations, but also performances, videos and music.

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Around the Nation
3:49 am
Tue August 6, 2013

With Budgets Tight, Small Towns Go Without Courthouses

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:06 am

In the small town of Coalinga, Calif., on the corner of 6th and Elm streets, the Fresno County Superior Court's old courthouse is still. Inside, veteran police Lt. Darren Blevins gestures inside an empty courtroom.

"In the past, when we actually had court in here, over on this wall here was the seating for the inmates or the people that were held in custody," he says.

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Originally from Montana, Marci grew up near the mountains and can't get enough of them.

Economy
3:30 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Ski Resorts Find Ways To Stay Busy When There's No Snow

In the summer, Snowmass ski resort in Colorado rents bikes instead of skis. It's an effort to create year-round revenue during a time when most ski resorts are closed.
Jeremy Swanson Aspen/Snowmass

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:50 am

With sizzling temperatures in much of the country, tourists are turning to mountain ski resorts to find relief. Resorts from Colorado to California and Oregon are on track to set a record this year for summer business.

Brandon Wilke is spending a long weekend at a resort just down the road from Aspen, Colo. He came for a wedding, but Wilke and his brother-in-law decided to bring their mountain bikes and try out some bike trails at the Snowmass ski resort. At first, Wilke says he didn't know mountain biking was an option.

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Around the Nation
3:29 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Dredging South Carolina's Rivers For Long-Forgotten Timber

Louis Marcell and Adam Jones prepare to search for old logs, known as sinker wood, on the bottom of Ashley River near Charleston, S.C. They use sonar and a book of old train lines to find the timber, some of which has been preserved in the mud since the 1800s.
Noam Eshel

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 12:56 pm

On the Ashley River, a few miles south of Charleston, S.C., the water is murky and the marsh grass high. A three-man logging crew is cruising on a 24-foot pontoon boat. It's low tide and logs are poking out everywhere.

Hewitt Emerson, owner of the Charleston-based reclaimed wood company Heartwood South, is in charge. He's going to an old saw mill site, but won't say exactly where. He's heading to Blackbeard's Creek, he says, as in pirate Blackbeard — the early 18th century scourge of the seas.

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It's All Politics
3:29 am
Tue August 6, 2013

On The Road With Max And Dave: A Tax Overhaul Tour

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., (center) and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., (right) speak about overhauling the tax code at the 3M Innovation Center in Maplewood, Minn., on July 8.
Hannah Foslien AP

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 9:18 am

Ask Americans about the most pressing concerns for the nation, and overhauling the tax code probably isn't all that high on the list — that is, unless those Americans happen to be Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., and Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., the chairmen of the congressional tax-writing committees.

The two lawmakers are on a mission to simplify the tax code.

When they're out on the road selling that tax overhaul, they don't wear ties and they skip much of the formality of Washington — like last names even. Just call them Max and Dave.

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The Two-Way
2:34 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Court-Martial To Begin Tuesday In Fort Hood Shooting Rampage

Maj. Nidal Hasan faces 13 charges of murder and 32 of attempted murder for the November 2009 shootings at Fort Hood, Texas.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 10:59 am

Former Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged with opening fire in a troop processing center at Fort Hood, Texas, and killing 13 people and wounding more than 30 others in 2009.

Hasan is representing himself in the death penalty case.

NPR's Wade Goodwyn tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne that means Hasan will be questioning witnesses he is accused of shooting.

Hassan is paralyzed from the waist down after being shot by a military police officer during the rampage.

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9:56 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Calhoun County to provide policing for city of Springfield

Lead in text: 
Council had already decided to close public safety department to address financial shortfall
Calhoun County Sheriff Department deputies will be patrolling the City of Springfield by Sept. 1 after the city council approved a policing contract Monday night. Five of seven council members agreed to negotiate a five-year contract with the sheriff department while two others said they preferred a contract with the City of Battle Creek Police Department.
8:53 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Michigan Chamber of Commerce launches voter education campaign supporting fracking

Lead in text: 
Chamber president says he wants to educate voters on importance of natural gas and danger of petition drive to ban fracking
LANSING - The Michigan Chamber of Commerce has launched a statewide campaign to promote fracking and oppose a potential ballot proposal aimed at banning the practice. The business group, which previously came out in support of fracking, has taken it a step further with billboards and an online campaign called "Protect Michigan's Energy Future."
8:48 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Holland Native remembered for service in law

Lead in text: 
Wendell Miles died July 31st at 97
Wendell Miles Judge Wendell Miles' list of public accomplishments is a long one, but family friend Julie Carey remembers him as a "genuine person" and "a charming man" who was always ready with a compliment. Miles died July 31 at 97. "He was just a sweet man," Carey said.
All Tech Considered
6:24 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Special Ops Envisions 'Iron Man'-Like Suit To Protect Troops

Concept art of the suit the Special Operations Command is trying to build.
Raytheon via YouTube

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All Tech Considered
6:24 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Trade Case Puts Apple In Washington's Sights

The U.S. Trade Representative has overturned a ban on the import of the iPhone 4 and the iPad 2.
David Paul Morris Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 7:08 pm

Apple has been notoriously disinterested in Washington politics. But two decisions coming from the Obama administration in the past few days indicate that Washington is increasingly interested in Apple.

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Shots - Health News
5:49 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Harsh In Hard Times? A Gene May Influence Mom's Behavior

A gene known as DRD2 affects the brain's dopamine system and is known to be associated with aggressive behavior.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 7:51 am

A gene that affects the brain's dopamine system appears to have influenced mothers' behavior during a recent economic downturn, researchers say.

At the beginning of the recession that began in 2007, mothers with the "sensitive" version of a gene called DRD2 became more likely to strike or scream at their children, the researchers say. Mothers with the other "insensitive" version of the gene didn't change their behavior.

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NPR Story
5:11 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Amazon CEO To Buy 'Washington Post' And Sister Papers

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The man who pushed the book publishing industry into the digital age is now buying one of the country's most storied newspaper companies. Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon.com, is acquiring The Washington Post and its small sister papers. The news broke after the markets closed today. NPR's David Folkenflik covers the newspaper industry, and he joins me now. And, David, this was, I think, the best-kept secret in Washington. Tell us some details of this transaction and how it came about.

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In August of 2008, Greg Collard took Interstate 77 - also known as the Hillbilly Highway - down to Charlotte and WFAE.

He came to us from West Virginia, where he spent eight years at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, including four as news director.

Greg has also worked at newspapers in West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio. Greg is a graduate of Marshall University in Huntington, WV, where he earned a bachelor's degree in journalism.

Around the Nation
5:00 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

From Cops To Lawyers, Indian Country Copes With High Crime

Tuba City, Ariz., corrections supervisor Robbin Preston in front of the new jail on the Navajo Nation. The recidivism rate was so high, Preston couldn't keep track of it.
Laurel Morales KJZZ

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Arizona's Monument Valley is known for its red sandstone buttes and spires, but now it's notorious for something else: crime. The Navajo Nation is one of the most violent reservations in the country. According to FBI reports, over the past five years, more rapes were reported on the Navajo Nation than in San Diego, Detroit or Denver, among other cities.

The U.S. attorney's office tries to take on the most violent crimes, but it often lacks enough evidence to prosecute. And because of antiquated tribal codes, Navajo courts can only order someone to serve one year in jail.

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Games & Humor
4:55 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Zombie Video Game Draws Inspiration From Real Fungus

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:59 pm

The Last of Us is a new survival horror video game. It follows a character named Joel as he fights off hostile humans and zombie-like creatures. The game was inspired by a BBC show on the scary effects of a fungus. (This piece initially aired July 9, 2013, on Morning Edition).

Around the Nation
4:55 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Running Program Uses Goal-Setting To Help Homeless

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Cities usually have an array of services to combat homelessness. These include shelters, soup kitchens, job assistance programs. But there's a new trend in helping the homeless: running.

Greg Collard of member station WFAE in Charlotte, North Carolina, reports on how running has changed the lives for some of the city's homeless people.

GREG COLLARD, BYLINE: You might wonder, how do you get the homeless interested in running? Well, here's a big enticement: free shoes. That grabbed the attention of Matthew Hoffman.

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