8:06 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

State, unions headed to impasse hearings

Lead in text: 
Private mediation before Civil Service Commission
State government officials and five unions representing more than 33,000 state workers are headed to impasse this month, after the two sides failed to reach agreement on the workers' next round of contracts. Wage increases and proposed changes to workers' health care plans appear to be at the heart of the dispute, but state officials and most union leaders aren't offering many details.
Around the Nation
5:46 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

NYC Race Focuses On Income Gap, But How Much Can A Mayor Do?

New York City mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio rides the subway while greeting commuters in New York on Monday.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:42 pm

Voters in New York City go to the polls Tuesday to choose their next mayor, and it appears all but certain that they'll elect Bill de Blasio, the city's public advocate.

The Democrat has built a wide lead in the polls by distancing himself from the incumbent mayor, billionaire Michael Bloomberg. In fact, de Blasio has made income inequality the central issue of his campaign, name-checking the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities dozens of times at debates and stump speeches.

Read more
NPR Story
5:46 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Amid A Rough Patch, Howard University Faces Flagging Morale

Students walk by Founders Library on Howard University campus in Washington, D.C.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:12 pm

Howard University, one of the country's most prominent historically black schools, has hit a rough patch in recent months.

The school's Faculty Senate recently voted no confidence in leaders of the school's Board of Trustees. That vote came just weeks after Howard's president announced a surprise early retirement and Moody's Investors Service downgraded the university's credit rating, as my Code Switch teammate Gene Demby has reported.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:13 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Now A Democrat, Ex-Florida Gov. Crist Tries To Get Old Job Back

Former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist announces Monday in St. Petersburg that he will run for governor as a Democrat.
Edward Linsmier Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:42 pm

Florida's governor's race just got more interesting. The state's former Republican governor, Charlie Crist, announced in St. Petersburg on Monday that he's entering the race as a Democrat.

Crist is running against Florida's current Republican governor, Rick Scott, a conservative elected with strong Tea Party support.

At a rally to kick off his campaign at a park overlooking Tampa Bay, Crist was unapologetic about his change in parties.

"Yeah, I'm running as a Democrat," he said. "And I am proud to do it."

Read more
Research News
5:13 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

How'd They Do That? The Story Of A Giant Rock And A Road Of Ice

The Large Stone Carving is the heaviest stone in the Forbidden City in Beijing. It was believed to have weighed more than 300 tons when it was first transported to the site between 1407 and 1420.
DEA/ W. Buss De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:42 pm

Great works of ancient engineering, like the Pyramids or Stonehenge, inspire awe in every beholder. But some onlookers also get inspired to figure out exactly how these structures were made.

Howard Stone, an engineer from Princeton University, had such a moment in Beijing's Forbidden City — a city-within-a-city of palaces and temples built in the 15th and 16th centuries. A carved, 300-ton slab that formed a ramp to one structure particularly caught Stone's eye. "How in the world did it get here?" he wondered.

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:13 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Childhood Maltreatment Can Leave Scars In The Brain

Girls are particularly vulnerable to brain changes caused by stress or trauma, researchers say.
Allen Johnson iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 12:21 pm

Maltreatment during childhood can lead to long-term changes in brain circuits that process fear, researchers say. This could help explain why children who suffer abuse are much more likely than others to develop problems like anxiety and depression later on.

Read more
Arts & More
4:41 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Pressing fresh apple cider on a fall afternoon

Joan Donaldson makes sure the cider goes in the jug while her husband John turns the crank of the cider press
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The grinder whirs as it slashes apples into pomace, and the chopped apples fall into a nylon mesh bag that lines the barrel of our small cider press. I drop more fruit into the hopper and already, juice puddles on the wooden platform that holds the barrel.

Read more
The Salt
4:09 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs?

In recent years, pork producers have found ways to keep the animals healthy through improved hygiene.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 7:42 pm

It's one of the most controversial practices in agriculture: feeding small amounts of antibiotics to animals in order to make them grow faster.

But what if the drugs don't even work very well?

There's some good evidence that they don't, at least in pigs. They used to deliver a boost in growth, but that effect has disappeared in recent years or declined greatly.

The reason for this is interesting and even paradoxical.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:15 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

From Sulking To Sanctions, A Street-Level View Of Life In Iran

Iranian demonstrators march in Tehran in 2011, during a protest asking the government to intensify its enforcement of the Islamic dress code.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Monday is the 34th anniversary of the 1979 storming of the American Embassy in Tehran, when Iranian militants took 66 hostages and held them for more than a year. U.S.-Iranian relations have been contentious ever since, but recent events have stirred hopes for progress.

Iranian voters overwhelmingly chose a more moderate president in June, and American and Iranian mediators are meeting to try to resolve disputes about Iran's nuclear program.

Read more
Book Reviews
3:01 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Female Friendship Puts 'New' Angle On Italian Classism And Machismo

The Story Of A New Name Book Cover

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 9:46 am

Some writers you read and move on, but every now and then you read one whose work knocks you back against the wall. This happened to me with the great Italian novelist Elena Ferrante.

I first encountered her through her scalding 2002 novel, The Days Of Abandonment, whose narrator, Olga, may be the scariest jilted wife since Medea. What makes Olga scary is not what she does, but what she thinks and feels, and her ferocious precision in describing everything from lousy sexual encounters to her not-altogether-maternal feelings about her children.

Read more
1:11 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Kalamazoo County and Enbridge reach agreement on access to park

Lead in text: 
Kalamazoo County Commissioners are scheduled to vote on Tuesday
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Kalamazoo County would receive $100,000 under a proposed agreement giving Enbridge, Inc. the right to set up a dredging operation at River Oaks County Park.
12:54 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Kellogg will cut 7% of global workforce

Lead in text: 
Battle Creek company reported net earnings of $326-million in third quarter, and increase of 2.5%.
Food-manufacturing company Kellogg Kellogg may have beat the Street with its third quarter 2013 earnings report Monday morning, but in some bad news for its global workforce, also announced a cost-savings program that will slash 7% of that workforce over the next four years. It also lowered its outlook for the remainder of 2013.
Parallels
12:39 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

China Sets Ambitious Agenda In 'Asian Space Race'

Nie Haisheng, Zhang Xiaoguang and Wang Yaping aboard the Tiangong-1 space module in June. China is leading what some see as a space race among Asian countries: It has worked on a lunar rover, a space station and an unmanned mission to Mars.
Wang Yongzhuo Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 8:57 pm

India's launch Tuesday of a satellite bound for Mars is the latest milestone in a space race among Asian nations. China, though, is still seen as the leader. A decade ago, China became the third nation to put up a manned spacecraft; it has worked on a lunar rover, a space station as well as its own unmanned mission to Mars.

Read more
Music Reviews
12:08 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Amir ElSaffar Navigates Uncharted Blue Notes On 'Alchemy'

Amir ElSaffar's new album is called Alchemy.
Nicole LeCorgne Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 3:01 pm

Trumpeter Amir ElSaffar grew up near Chicago, playing jazz trumpet. In the early 2000s, while in his mid-20s, he began investigating the music of his Iraqi heritage, studying in Baghdad and with expatriate musicians in Europe. Then he began combining the two.

Read more
Business
12:07 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

SAC Capital Agrees To Plead Guilty To Insider Trading

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a guilty plea.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: SAC Capital Advisors is expected to plead guilty to securities fraud today. The hedge fund company has agreed to pay $1.8 billion to settle charges of insider trader. It's said to be the biggest fine ever in a case like this. The settlement will be announced at a news conference later today in New York City. And that's where we've reached NPR's Jim Zarroli. And Jim, explain for us, if you can, what SAC has actually agreed to here.

Read more
Politics
12:07 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Veteran Pennsylvania Congressman Can't Escape GOP Civil War

From left, Rep. Lee Terry, R-Neb., Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pa., and House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., walk to the floor of the House for the final series of votes on a bill to fund the government, in Washington on Sept. 28.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:26 pm

At 7 a.m. on a recent weekday morning, the Bedford Diner, in Bedford, Pa., is jumping.

Way in the back, some tables have been pushed together for a weekly prayer breakfast that's really a gathering of old friends — all military veterans, some of whom are retired. Art Halvorson, a 58-year-old regular here, is a real estate developer, a former career coast guard pilot and now a Tea Party-backed candidate going after seven-term Rep. Bill Shuster in next year's Republican primary.

Read more
Middle East
12:00 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Syrian Humanitarian Crisis As Bad As Rwanda?

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:57 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, activists in Washington, D.C. are asking jury members to vote their conscience not the law. We'll ask why some people think jury nullification is the only way for minorities to get a fair day in court. That's in just a few minutes.

Read more
Law
12:00 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Jury Nullification: Acquitting Based On Principle

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:57 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

A new billboard in the nation's capital is stirring some controversy. It tells jury members to forget the law and vote their conscience. It reads - "Jury duty? Know your rights. Good jurors nullify bad laws." And it's caught the attention of prosecutors, not surprisingly. The group behind the ads is called the Fully Informed Jury Association. It says jurors should acquit defendants if they disagree with the law, even if all evidence points towards a guilty verdict.

Read more
Education
12:00 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

New Scholarship Boosts Urban Art

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:57 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now we'll continue with this theme of using hip-hop to teach. When legendary lyricist and DJ MC Lyte first appeared on the national scene 1988, she wasn't thinking about education. This is her hit song, "Lyte as a Rock."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LYTE AS A ROCK")

Read more
10:59 am
Mon November 4, 2013

South Haven School Board member launches bid for state House

Lead in text: 
Democrat Annie Brown running for seat held by Republican Aric Nesbitt
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - South Haven School Board trustee Annie Brown announced today that she will run as a Democratic candidate for the 66th District state House seat. "I'm honored," said Brown, who has served the South Haven School Board for eight years.
NPR Story
10:27 am
Mon November 4, 2013

BlackBerry Abandons Plans To Sell Itself, Replaces CEO

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:39 pm

A few weeks ago, the smartphone maker announced it had signed a letter of intent to sell the company valued at $4.7 billion to Fairfax Financial Holdings. Instead, in a statement released Monday, BlackBerry announced it will receive a $1 billion investment from Fairfax Financial and others. BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins will step down and be replaced by interim CEO John Chen.

Sarah Gonzalez is the multimedia education reporter for WLRN's StateImpact Florida project. She comes from NPR in D.C. where she was a national desk reporter, web and show producer as an NPR Kroc Fellow. The San Diego native has worked as a reporter and producer for KPBS in San Diego and KALW in San Francisco, covering under-reported issues like youth violence, food insecurity and public education. Her work has been awarded an SPJ Sigma Delta Chi and regional Edward R. Murrow awards. She graduated from Mills College in 2009 with a bachelorâ

Around the Nation
7:10 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Sen. Rand Paul Responds To Plagiarism Accusation

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Senator Rand Paul is not happy to be accused of plagiarism. He told ABC if dueling was legal, he might challenge one of his critics and seemed to refer to TV host Rachel Maddow. There's just one complication - under all dueling customs, if he challenges Maddow she gets to choose the weapon. Abe Lincoln was once challenged to a duel and chose broadswords, letting the long-armed Lincoln reach his opponent first. That duel was called off. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:04 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Something Fishy Is Going On In Michigan

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Something fishy is going on in Michigan. A 20-pound carp is campaigning as a write-in candidate for the city council in Ann Arbor. The fish was removed from a pond last year and released into a nearby river. That's the biography, as we understand it. From the candidate's Twitter feed, the fish describes himself as a politician and bottom-feeder. He tweets: Since I have no actual feet, I don't have to stand for anything. People in Michigan cast their votes tomorrow.

Ned Sublette
6:46 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Author and Musician Ned Sublette on "The American Slave Coast"

Ned Sublette
Credit Courtesy photo

Interview with Ned Sublette

Ned Sublette says his next book The American Slave Coast grew out of his previous work. 

Read more
6:03 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Kalamazoo County Commissioner to run for state House

Lead in text: 
Phil Stinchomb currently in his second term on county commission
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - There are now two Kalamazoo County Commissioners vying to fill a vacant state representative seat in the 61st District. Phil Stinchcomb, R-Portage , announced today he will run for the state House in 2014, joining fellow Republican commissioner Brandt Iden
Author Interviews
5:42 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Amy Tan Weaves Family Mystery Into 'Valley Of Amazement'

Amy Tan's latest novel, The Valley of Amazement, will be published on Tuesday.
Rick Smolanagainst Against All Odds Productions

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Amy Tan was 200 pages into a new novel when she attended a large exhibition on Shanghai life in the early 1900s. While there, she bought a book she thought might help her as she researched details on life in the Old City. She stopped turning pages when she came upon a group portrait.

Read more
Politics
4:39 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Va. Governor's Race May Be Proxy For Broader National Debate

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Last month's government shutdown could deliver its first political victim tomorrow. Republican Ken Cuccinelli is trailing in the Virginia Governor's race. During a campaign appearance this weekend, President Obama tried to tie Cuccinelli to the shutdown, and also to the Tea Party. Cuccinelli, in turn, tried to link his Democratic opponent, Terry McAuliffe, to the troubled rollout of Obamacare.

Read more
Business
4:37 am
Mon November 4, 2013

iPhone Users Face Dilemma Of When To Upgrade

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's talk about smartphones. And for iPhone users, an important decision: when to upgrade. Apple's latest iPhones, the 5S and 5C, have been out for a couple months now. But some people are resisting temptation. They're perfectly happy with their older iPhones, except for one thing, when they upgrade to Apple's new operating system, things slow down.

To talk about how to manage this decision, we're joined - as we often are - by Bloomberg technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky. Hey, Rich.

RICH JAROSLOVSKY: Good morning.

Read more
Politics
4:37 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Rep. Shuster To Face Tea Party Challenger Next Year

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, during the government shutdown, many House Republicans said the policy was unwise, but persisted for weeks in voting with their speaker, John Boehner. One reason was party loyalty. Another reason, according to analysts, was fear. Lawmakers did not want to run the risk of a challenge in a Republican primary from candidates saying they weren't trying hard enough.

Read more

Pages