Music Reviews
1:35 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Vince Gill And Paul Franklin Ain't 'Foolin' Around' With Bakersfield Sound

Vince Gill (left) and Paul Franklin.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:21 pm

Country-music star Vince Gill and steel guitarist Paul Franklin have teamed up to record a new concept album called Bakersfield. Their idea is to cover hits from the 1960s and '70s by two artists who helped define the Bakersfield, Calif., country sound: Merle Haggard and the Strangers and Buck Owens and the Buckaroos. But this is no nostalgia-fest — it's a vital testament to music that retains energy and innovation.

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Author Interviews
1:32 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Talent Or Skill?: Homing In On The Elusive 'Sports Gene'

According to author David Epstein, hitters like the Los Angeles Angels' Albert Pujols look at the movement of the pitcher's shoulder, torso or hand to help them hit the ball.
Brian Bahr Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:59 pm

We've all had the experience of watching a great athletic performance — from gymnast Mary Lou Retton defying gravity to Michael Jordan sinking a mind-blowing turnaround jumper — and wondered: Were they born with that talent or can you get there with hard work and practice?

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Europe
12:46 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

World War II Researchers Say 'Italian Schindler' Was A Myth

The Risiera di San Sabba in Trieste was used during World War II as the only death camp on Italian soil. In the building's courtyard, the outline on the brick wall is where the crematorium was located.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 6:24 pm

A group of Italian researchers who have studied troves of World War II documents have found no evidence that Giovanni Palatucci, a police official long credited as the "Italian Schindler," saved the lives of 5,000 Jews.

The findings are demolishing the Italian national icon and angering supporters of the man who has been honored at Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, and who has been put on the track to sainthood.

'Unfounded' Claims Of Heroism?

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Parallels
12:22 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

A West Bank Spring At The Center Of Deadly Struggle

Palestinian Bashir Tamimi, 57, drinks water from a spring on land that he says belongs to his family. Teenagers from a nearby Israeli settlement built collection pools and brought in picnic tables when they saw no one using the spring. It has now become a source of conflict.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 10:00 am

There's a pretty little spring in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, where fresh water has dripped from the rock, probably for centuries.

Now it is the center of a deadly struggle over land.

Israeli teenagers from Halamish, the Jewish settlement a short walk uphill, found the spring several years ago. It flows from a small cave.

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Sports
12:06 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

NFL: Is The Game Getting Safer?

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:44 pm

As fans and teams get ready for another season of football, a new study sheds light on game safety. Host Michel Martin talks with Jesse David of Edgeworth Economics about whether efforts to cut down on serious injuries are getting results.

Remembrances
12:06 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:44 pm

Julius Chambers argued numerous civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court - and won them all. Host Michel Martin remembers the groundbreaking attorney, who passed away recently at the age of 76.

Music
12:06 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Singer Alice Smith: 'I've Always Been Myself'

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:44 pm

Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Alice Smith has managed to keep her music unique, despite pressure from music labels. She joins host Michel Martin for a special performance chat of her latest album She.

Kalamazoo River oil spill
8:52 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Battle Creek Enquirer reports on Enbridge's buying homes near 2010 oil spill

Kalamazoo River - file photo
Credit WMUK

Interview with Jennifer Bowman

    

After an oil spill on the Kalamazoo River in 2010, Enbridge Energy offered to buy homes in the area within 200 feet of the river. 

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7:12 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Other struggling cities watching how Detroit handles health care

Lead in text: 
Orr wants to route Detroit retirees under 65 to health insurance exchange
Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr's proposal to leverage Obamacare to shed some of Detroit's $5.7 billion debt for retiree health care has angered unions and struck a sour chord with Democrats and Republicans alike. But it might benefit the city and become a model for other financially struggling American cities, some experts say.
Around the Nation
7:09 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Sideburns Contest To Honor Commodore Perry

Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry won a major victory over the British 200 years ago at the Battle of Lake Erie. On Wednesday the citizens of Erie, Pa., will honor him the best way they know how — with a sideburns contest. Judges are looking for sideburns that resemble Commodore Perry's famous mutton chops.

Around the Nation
7:05 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Preschooler To Serve Second Term As Mayor Of Minn. Town

The mayor of Dorset, Minn., is now four years old. Bobby Tufts' named was pulled out of a hat last year, making him mayor of the town of 20 people. Dorset doesn't have a formal government. On Sunday, his name was drawn again.

Books News & Features
6:59 am
Mon August 5, 2013

E-Books Strain Relations Between Libraries, Publishing Houses

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 2:23 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

E-books have strained the relations between libraries and the major publishing houses. Libraries say they're being cut out of the market because publishers are afraid they could lose money selling e-books to libraries. After much negotiation, the publishers are experimenting with new ways of doing business. But some libraries are already looking to bypass the high prices and restrictions that publishers place on e-books.

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6:53 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Fired Community Action CEO complained of meddling

Lead in text: 
Nancy Macfarlane was fired June 20th from Battle Creek non-profit
Less than a month before she was fired, Community Action CEO Nancy Macfarlane believed the agency's board chairman had become so intrusive in her daily work that she filed a formal complaint against him with other board members.
6:47 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Stryker CEO reflects on first year on job

Lead in text: 
Kevin Lobo says Kalamazoo and Portage remain critical to medical device maker
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Since beginning his new job nearly a year ago, Kevin Lobo is enjoying all the firsts involved in leading medical device maker Stryker Corp., including seeing the title Chief Executive Officer on his resume. Within months of taking the reins, the 48-year-old gave the company a first, too.
Africa
6:23 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Why Gay Pride Celebrations In Uganda Were Discreet

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 1:44 pm

Gay pride celebrations are held loudly each summer in New York, Paris and Berlin. But when Uganda held its version of the event this weekend, it was done very privately. It came as the Ugandan parliament considers a piece of extremely anti-gay legislation, and as discrimination against gays is widespread

Chuck Quirmbach is a Milwaukee-based reporter who covers developments and issues in Southeastern Wisconsin that are of statewide interest. He has numerous years of experience covering state government, elections, the environment, energy, racial diversity issues, clergy abuse claims and major baseball stadium doings. He enjoys covering all topics.

Chuck is a frequent contributor to National Public Radio and several other regional or national radio outlets. He has won several individual awards, and several as part of a collaboration with other reporters.

(414) 227-2040 

 

 

Around the Nation
6:07 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Donations Help Detroit Bury Unclaimed Bodies

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Sports
5:52 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A-Rod Said To Be Facing Long Suspension From Baseball

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Major League Baseball appears set to hand down suspensions to several players implicated in performance enhancing drug use. New York Yankees All-Star Alex Rodriguez is the biggest name by far on that list and he also faces the longest suspension. NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now for an update. Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

MONTAGNE: So what length of penalty does Alex Rodriguez face?

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Analysis
5:07 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Washington Stresses Seriousness Of Terrorist Threat

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 7:29 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Politics
5:07 am
Mon August 5, 2013

McConnell Squares Off With Rivals At Ky. Political Picnic

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 5:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Over the weekend the tiny town of Fancy Farm, Kentucky was the scene of a political brawl worthy of the Hatfields and McCoys. No one was run out of town, but Mitch O'Connell, the Senate Republican leader, who is asking Kentuckians for a sixth term, did get pretty roughed up - verbally. You'd hardly guess it all began as a church picnic.

NPR's David Welna was there.

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Television
5:07 am
Mon August 5, 2013

BBC Announces Peter Capaldi Is The Next Dr. Who

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 5:40 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

From space travel to travel through space and time...

(SOUNDBITE OF SOUND EFFECTS)

WERTHEIMER: Any fan of "Dr. Who" recognizes that sound. It's a whirling blue police call box, a tardis, transporting the main character on the long running BBC program. The plot line has the Doctor regenerating ever so often. Which means a new actor comes in to play the title role, and now the 50-year-old science fiction show has just named its 12th Doctor.

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I'm a reporter with Harvest Public Media based at KUNC, covering the wide range of agricultural stories in Colorado.

The Salt
3:27 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Ecologists Turn To Planned Grazing To Revive Grassland Soil

Fox Ranch, outside Yuma County, Colo., is a 14,000-acre nature preserve and working commercial cattle ranch. The ranch is used by the Nature Conservancy to put into practice its panned grazing technique.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:24 pm

The world's soil is in trouble. Ecologists say without dramatic changes to how we manage land, vast swathes of grassland are at risk of turning into hard-packed desert. To make sure that doesn't happen, researchers are testing out innovative ways to keep moisture in the soil.

In eastern Colorado, one way could be in the plodding hooves of cattle.

Conventional wisdom tells you that if ranchland ground has less grass, the problem is too many cows. But that's not always the case. It depends on how you manage them, if you make sure they keep moving.

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Shots - Health News
3:25 am
Mon August 5, 2013

When Treating Abnormal Breast Cells, Sometimes Less Is More

Sally O'Neill decided to have a double mastectomy rather than "do a wait-and-see."
Richard Knox NPR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 11:39 am

When Sally O'Neill's doctor told her she had an early form of cancer in one of her breasts, she didn't agonize about what she wanted to.

The 42-year-old mother of two young girls wanted a double mastectomy.

"I decided at that moment that I wanted them both taken off," says O'Neill, who lives in a suburb of Boston. "There wasn't a real lot of thought process to it. I always thought, 'If this happens to me, this is what I'm going to do.' Because I'm not taking any chances. I want the best possible outcome. I don't want to do a wait-and-see."

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:24 am
Mon August 5, 2013

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation.
Courtesy of Jack Hansan

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 9:49 am

For the Month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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9:10 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Michigan's fee for heavy trucks examined

Lead in text: 
Permit fee of $50 doesn't cover costs of inspections and damage to roads
Michigan's $50 fee for super-heavy truck loads doesn't go far to cover stress on roads When talk turns to the poor condition of Michigan roads, many point to the fact that the state's gross weight limit for trucks - 164,000 pounds - is more than double the federal limit and the A link to this page will be included in your message.
9:04 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Attorney General Schuette defends involvement in Detroit bankruptcy

Lead in text: 
Has filed motion saying state Constitution protects pensions of city retirees
Detroit- Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is defending his involvement in Detroit's historic bankruptcy filing after city attorneys expressed confusion in court about his role in the case. In an interview Saturday, Schuette said he sees no conflict of interest.
8:46 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Douglas Community Association faces funding deadline

Lead in text: 
Association serving Kalamazoo's north side could face closure without new sources of revenue
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The Douglass Community Association is in danger of closing within 30 days due to financial difficulties, but the board chairman says it "is fighting tooth and nail" to keep the organization alive.
Education
6:38 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

Missed Summer Learning Spells Out Long-Term Struggles

A researcher at Johns Hopkins University says there are serious setbacks for children without summer educational opportunities, known as the "summer slide."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 7:52 pm

At first glance, Horizons looks like an ordinary summer getaway for kids: There are games, bonding time and lots of bagged snacks. But along with the songs and the pool, there are fractions to memorize and online grammar quizzes to take.

An affiliate of a national network, the program in Washington, D.C., is a six-week, free summer service for children from low-income families. Its purpose is simple: to make sure they don't fall behind in school by the time September rolls around.

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Remembrances
5:06 pm
Sun August 4, 2013

In His Own Words: Remembering Poet Robert Hayden

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:38 pm

Robert Hayden was born in Detroit 100 years ago Sunday. He became the first African-American to receive the honor now known as "poet laureate." Among his most famous works is the collection of short poems called Elegies for Paradise Valley. We hear an excerpt from the collection, as read by the author in 1976.

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