Middle East
12:00 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Syrian Humanitarian Crisis As Bad As Rwanda?

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:57 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, activists in Washington, D.C. are asking jury members to vote their conscience not the law. We'll ask why some people think jury nullification is the only way for minorities to get a fair day in court. That's in just a few minutes.

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Law
12:00 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Jury Nullification: Acquitting Based On Principle

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:57 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

A new billboard in the nation's capital is stirring some controversy. It tells jury members to forget the law and vote their conscience. It reads - "Jury duty? Know your rights. Good jurors nullify bad laws." And it's caught the attention of prosecutors, not surprisingly. The group behind the ads is called the Fully Informed Jury Association. It says jurors should acquit defendants if they disagree with the law, even if all evidence points towards a guilty verdict.

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Education
12:00 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

New Scholarship Boosts Urban Art

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:57 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now we'll continue with this theme of using hip-hop to teach. When legendary lyricist and DJ MC Lyte first appeared on the national scene 1988, she wasn't thinking about education. This is her hit song, "Lyte as a Rock."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LYTE AS A ROCK")

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10:59 am
Mon November 4, 2013

South Haven School Board member launches bid for state House

Lead in text: 
Democrat Annie Brown running for seat held by Republican Aric Nesbitt
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - South Haven School Board trustee Annie Brown announced today that she will run as a Democratic candidate for the 66th District state House seat. "I'm honored," said Brown, who has served the South Haven School Board for eight years.
NPR Story
10:27 am
Mon November 4, 2013

BlackBerry Abandons Plans To Sell Itself, Replaces CEO

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:39 pm

A few weeks ago, the smartphone maker announced it had signed a letter of intent to sell the company valued at $4.7 billion to Fairfax Financial Holdings. Instead, in a statement released Monday, BlackBerry announced it will receive a $1 billion investment from Fairfax Financial and others. BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins will step down and be replaced by interim CEO John Chen.

Sarah Gonzalez is the multimedia education reporter for WLRN's StateImpact Florida project. She comes from NPR in D.C. where she was a national desk reporter, web and show producer as an NPR Kroc Fellow. The San Diego native has worked as a reporter and producer for KPBS in San Diego and KALW in San Francisco, covering under-reported issues like youth violence, food insecurity and public education. Her work has been awarded an SPJ Sigma Delta Chi and regional Edward R. Murrow awards. She graduated from Mills College in 2009 with a bachelorâ

Around the Nation
7:10 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Sen. Rand Paul Responds To Plagiarism Accusation

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Senator Rand Paul is not happy to be accused of plagiarism. He told ABC if dueling was legal, he might challenge one of his critics and seemed to refer to TV host Rachel Maddow. There's just one complication - under all dueling customs, if he challenges Maddow she gets to choose the weapon. Abe Lincoln was once challenged to a duel and chose broadswords, letting the long-armed Lincoln reach his opponent first. That duel was called off. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:04 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Something Fishy Is Going On In Michigan

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Something fishy is going on in Michigan. A 20-pound carp is campaigning as a write-in candidate for the city council in Ann Arbor. The fish was removed from a pond last year and released into a nearby river. That's the biography, as we understand it. From the candidate's Twitter feed, the fish describes himself as a politician and bottom-feeder. He tweets: Since I have no actual feet, I don't have to stand for anything. People in Michigan cast their votes tomorrow.

Ned Sublette
6:46 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Author and Musician Ned Sublette on "The American Slave Coast"

Ned Sublette
Credit Courtesy photo

Interview with Ned Sublette

Ned Sublette says his next book The American Slave Coast grew out of his previous work. 

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6:03 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Kalamazoo County Commissioner to run for state House

Lead in text: 
Phil Stinchomb currently in his second term on county commission
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - There are now two Kalamazoo County Commissioners vying to fill a vacant state representative seat in the 61st District. Phil Stinchcomb, R-Portage , announced today he will run for the state House in 2014, joining fellow Republican commissioner Brandt Iden
Author Interviews
5:42 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Amy Tan Weaves Family Mystery Into 'Valley Of Amazement'

Amy Tan's latest novel, The Valley of Amazement, will be published on Tuesday.
Rick Smolanagainst Against All Odds Productions

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Amy Tan was 200 pages into a new novel when she attended a large exhibition on Shanghai life in the early 1900s. While there, she bought a book she thought might help her as she researched details on life in the Old City. She stopped turning pages when she came upon a group portrait.

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Politics
4:39 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Va. Governor's Race May Be Proxy For Broader National Debate

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Last month's government shutdown could deliver its first political victim tomorrow. Republican Ken Cuccinelli is trailing in the Virginia Governor's race. During a campaign appearance this weekend, President Obama tried to tie Cuccinelli to the shutdown, and also to the Tea Party. Cuccinelli, in turn, tried to link his Democratic opponent, Terry McAuliffe, to the troubled rollout of Obamacare.

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Business
4:37 am
Mon November 4, 2013

iPhone Users Face Dilemma Of When To Upgrade

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's talk about smartphones. And for iPhone users, an important decision: when to upgrade. Apple's latest iPhones, the 5S and 5C, have been out for a couple months now. But some people are resisting temptation. They're perfectly happy with their older iPhones, except for one thing, when they upgrade to Apple's new operating system, things slow down.

To talk about how to manage this decision, we're joined - as we often are - by Bloomberg technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky. Hey, Rich.

RICH JAROSLOVSKY: Good morning.

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Politics
4:37 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Rep. Shuster To Face Tea Party Challenger Next Year

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, during the government shutdown, many House Republicans said the policy was unwise, but persisted for weeks in voting with their speaker, John Boehner. One reason was party loyalty. Another reason, according to analysts, was fear. Lawmakers did not want to run the risk of a challenge in a Republican primary from candidates saying they weren't trying hard enough.

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Author Interviews
3:18 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Teddy Roosevelt's 'Bully Pulpit' Isn't The Platform It Once Was

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

When Teddy Roosevelt was president, reporter Lincoln Steffens came to him with a request: "Mr. President," he said, "I want to investigate corruption in the federal government." And Roosevelt responded in a rather astonishing way, as presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

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Parallels
3:17 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Syria's Moderate Rebels Fight A Battle On Two Fronts

A Syrian fighter from the Islamist rebel group Jabhat al-Nusra inspects a resident's identification papers at a checkpoint in Aleppo on Oct. 26. Syria's Islamist fighters are generally better funded than their more moderate counterparts.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Like many Syrian exiles, Murhaf Jouejati, a professor at National Defense University, is frustrated by U.S. policy toward Syria. He says there's been only a trickle of U.S. aid to the secular, nationalist opposition in Syria, while the Islamists have no trouble raising money through their networks in the Arab world.

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Shots - Health News
3:16 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues

Say hello to your microbiome, Rob Stein. Our intrepid correspondent decided to get his gut bacteria analyzed. Now he's wondering if he needs to eat more garlic and onions.
Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 3:28 pm

After spending months working on a series of stories about the trillions of friendly microbes that live in and on our bodies, I decided it might be interesting to explore my own microbiome.

So I pulled out my credit card and paid the $99 needed to sign up for the American Gut Project, one of a couple of "citizen science" or crowdsourced microbiome projects.

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6:42 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Gay rights becomes major issue in Holland City Council election

Lead in text: 
Holland races being watched closely by gay rights groups across state
Holland Elections in this quaint west Michigan community are normally stolid affairs. City Council candidates often run unopposed and, if theyre challenged, the campaigns are unfailingly civil. Not this year. Two incumbents are being opposed by challengers who would reverse a vote by the council in 2011 declining to add sexual orientation to a city anti-discrimination law.
6:28 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Brad Ausmus named Detroit Tigers' manager

Lead in text: 
Tigers job will be first big league managerial job for Ausmus
Detroit– The Tigers have their new manager.It’s Brad Ausmus, the long-time catcher who was introduced Sunday at Comerica Park as the successor to the retired Jim Leyland. Ausmus signed a three-year contract with a club option for a fourth season.
6:18 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Candidates for Detroit Mayor visit churches on Sunday before election

Lead in text: 
Mike Duggan and Benny Napoleon making last minute push for votes
Detroit Mayoral candidates Benny Napoleon and Mike Duggan hit the churches Sunday with two days to go before Tuesdays election, making their cases to be the city's next elected leader.
6:12 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Bill would allow medical marijuana in edible form

Lead in text: 
Michigan Court of Appeals ruling said smoking is only legal way to use medicinal pot
The old joke about marijuana brownies was no laughing matter to Michigan's medical-marijuana users after the state Court of Appeals ruled as illegal virtually any medical means of using the drug other than smoking it. A new bill in the state Legislature would address the problem.
6:06 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Exaggerated account of wolf sighting led to effort to allow wolf hunt

Lead in text: 
Investigation finds actual incident became basis of "Michigan myth"
IRONWOOD, MI -- Mythical moments are born from small facts. They can become untruths. This is an example. The wolf and the dog are nearly nose to nose, perhaps five feet apart, eyes locked.
Author Interviews
5:34 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

With Fading Memory, Terry Pratchett Revisits 'Carpet People'

Best known for the Discworld fantasy series, Terry Pratchett was diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimer's disease in 2007. But that hasn't kept him from continuing to write.
Rob Wilkins Courtesy of Clarion

Sir Terry Pratchett is one of Britain's best-selling authors. His science-fiction series Discworld has sold millions of copies worldwide. Pratchett is incredibly prolific — since his first novel was published in 1971, he has written on average two books every year.

But in 2007, 59-year-old Pratchett announced that he had been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. As a result, Pratchett can no longer read.

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Lakshmi Singh is midday newscaster for NPR. She joined NPR's award-winning Newscast Unit in 2000.

Around the Nation
5:07 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Newark Considers What Life Will Be Like After Cory Booker

Democratic Sen. Cory Booker, formerly mayor of Newark, N.J., arrives in the Old Senate Chamber on Thursday for an oath-of-office ceremony.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 11:22 am

For years, Newark, N.J., had the reputation of being a crime-ridden, low-income city. Former Mayor Cory Booker helped change that perception.

Thursday, the Democrat was sworn in as a U.S. senator, and it's unclear what that means for the city's future.

While Booker brought attention — and funding — to Newark, he couldn't completely tackle the violence that has persisted for years. As mayoral candidates begin making their cases, crime is a common theme.

'Now A City Of Hope'

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World
5:07 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

As Mirrors Beam Light To Town, Norwegians Share Patch Of Sun

People gather in the central square of Rjukan, Norway, on Wednesday to bask in the sun reflected by mirrors on a nearby mountainside.
NTB Scanpix/Reuters/Landov

The small town of Rjukan has long had to make do without sunlight during the cold Norwegian winters.

But that changed Wednesday, when the town debuted a system of high-tech mirrors to reflect sunlight from neighboring peaks into the valley below.

Rjukan, originally founded 100 years ago as an industrial outpost for the energy company Norsk Hydro, is nestled between several mountains and does not receive direct sunlight from late September to mid-March — nearly six months out of the year.

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NPR Story
5:07 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

How An Aqueduct Turned Los Angeles Into A 'Garden Of Eden'

Los Angeles saw a dramatic boom in growth after the construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct in 1913. The system delivers water from the Owens River in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains to the city.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:36 pm

Today the beauty of Los Angeles is dramatically symbolic of the ancient prophecy the desert shall "blossom like a rose."

This blossoming was made possible by the birth of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, opened 100 years ago this month. The opening of the aqueduct might as well have been the birth of the modern West and the image of the city as a Garden of Eden.

The vast quantities of water the aqueduct moved made Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Phoenix and other cities across the region possible.

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Around the Nation
5:07 pm
Sun November 3, 2013

Far From Diwali's Lights, The Warm Glow Of Home

Little oil lamps mark Diwali celebrations in Allahabad, India, far away from American homes.
Sanjay Kanojia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 9:42 am

Small flickering oil lamps known as diyas are lighting up Indian homes in South Asian communities around the globe on Sunday as hundreds of millions of people observe Diwali.

Otherwise known as the Festival of Lights, it's a religious celebration of self-awareness and reflection. Diwali is a public holiday in a number of other nations, but it's not nearly so well-known in the U.S., where families must rely on themselves to keep the tradition alive.

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Health
5:38 pm
Sat November 2, 2013

With Rise Of Painkiller Abuse, A Closer Look At Heroin

The amount of prescription painkillers sold to pharmacies, hospitals and doctors' offices quadrupled between 1999 and 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 11:26 am

Abuse of prescription painkillers is a "growing, deadly epidemic," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

On Oct. 24, the Food and Drug Administration recommended putting new restrictions on hydrocodone, sold as Vicodin and other brand names.

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Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism . Lynn serves as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is a member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on twitter @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x367

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