The Salt
10:44 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Farm Families Pick Massive Corn Harvest As Prices Shrink

Curt Friesen is a fourth-generation farmer in central Nebraska.
Grant Gerlock for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 2:39 pm

Corn prices are down and the farm bill is stalled in Congress. So there's a lot of uncertainly in the air as harvest season gets into full swing across the Midwest. But this is a time of year when farm families like the Friesens in Henderson, Neb., come together to focus on the big task at hand: the corn harvest.

Everyone in the family has a job to do.

"Like my dad — he drives auger wagon," Curt Friesen says. "He drives auger wagon only. That's all he's done since 1976, I think. ... My wife, Nancy, she drives the combine; that's her job."

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WestSouthwest
9:21 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Teaching tolerance using racist memorabilia

David Pilgrim in the Museum of Racist Memorabilia
Credit Ferris State University

The nation’s long struggle with racial discrimination has left some litter behind: objects some now call “contemptible collectibles”. Some of these are on display inside the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State University in Big Rapids. Its founder and curator is David Pilgrim, the university’s vice-president for diversity and inclusion. He speaks Thursday, October 16th, at 5:30 p.m. at Western Michigan University in the Richmond Center for Visual Arts, Room 2008.

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Around the Nation
7:54 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Pa. Caterpillars Predict Wet, Cold Winter

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:41 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Albuquerque Trolley Will Take You Past Walter White's Home

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:12 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

California's Universal Studios has a tour where you see the sets of old movies and TV shows. So does Albuquerque, New Mexico. The ABQ Trolley Company has been taking people on tours of sites seen in the show "Breaking Bad." You roll past the home of main character Walter White, or see the carwash where he made extra money before starting to cook meth. The company is lengthening its tour season. Spoiler Alert: The series has ended.

6:29 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Benton Harbor Manager says money from city income tax would mostly go to pensions

Lead in text: 
Tony Saunders says city pensions are only funded at 52% right now
BENTON HARBOR - Emergency Manager Tony Saunders is bringing a dose of reality into the debate of how the city income tax revenue will be spent if Benton Harbor voters approve the proposal during the Nov. 5 election.
Ecstatic Voices
6:15 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Before Churches Had Songbooks, There Was 'Lined-Out' Gospel

Church elder Elwood Cornett preaches at a recent reunion of Old Regular Baptists. Brother Don Pratt is seated behind him in a blue shirt and tie.
Cindy Johnston NPR

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:12 am

Deep in the hills of Appalachia, there's a mournful, beautiful style of church music that hasn't changed since the 18th century.

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Harvest Public Media's reporter at NET News, where he started as Morning Edition host in 2008. He joined Harvest Public Media in July 2012. Grant has visited coal plants, dairy farms, horse tracks and hospitals to cover a variety of stories. Before going to Nebraska, Grant studied mass communication as a grad student at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and completed his undergrad at Buena Vista University in Storm Lake, Iowa. He grew up on a farm in southwestern Iowa where he listened to public radio in the tractor, but has taken up city life in Lincoln, Neb.

Politics
4:50 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Government Shutdown Delays Start Of Crab Season

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 5:27 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Crabbing season starts today in Alaska, well, except it doesn't. Crabbers and their boats are stuck in port because they can't get the permits that they need to begin their work. Federal workers who issue those permits are off the job because of the partial government shutdown and this is cutting into the short three month Alaska crab season, which is worth upwards of $200 million for the crabbers alone.

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Around the Nation
4:50 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Harvest Brings Farm Families Together, Redefines Commitment

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 5:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, here's a reality about farming. From the earliest days of this country, it's been an uncertain business, and for many decades, national policies have been designed to smooth out that risk. But, of course, the risk never entirely goes away. You can never control the rain, for example, and lately the uncertainty has been growing. Corn prices are down. The farm bill is stalled in Congress and there's a sense that good times may be fading.

From Nebraska, Grant Gerlock of NET News brings us his report.

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Europe
4:50 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Ethnic Divisions In Russia Grow Sharper

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 5:40 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's Morning Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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After nearly a decade as an award-winning Foreign Correspondent with NPR's international desk, Eric Westervelt returned in September 2013 to domestic news with a new national beat covering American education as an Education Correspondent.

In this role, he covers the news, issues, and trends in classrooms across the country, from pre-K to higher education. He has a strong interest in the multiple ways in which technology is disrupting traditional pedagogy.

Westervelt recently returned from a 2013 John S Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University. The fellowship focused on journalistic innovation, leadership, entrepreneurship and the future of news.

Around the Nation
2:51 am
Tue October 15, 2013

One Roof, Many Generations: Redefining The Single-Family Home

Three generations live under this roof: (from left) 19-year-old Jamie Dusseault, grandmother Jacque Ruggles, mother Marci Dusseault and 22-year-old Chelsie Dusseault.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:12 am

New homes are back in a big way — literally. This summer, a typical new house in Phoenix was more than 20 percent larger than a resale home as builders across the country added more space to accommodate post-recession lifestyles.

Take Jacque Ruggles' family, for example. Four women from three generations live under one roof.

"I'm the matriarch," Ruggles says. "I'm grandma."

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Education
2:49 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Silicon Valley Trailer Park Residents Fight To Stay

Palo Alto middle school student Jennifer Munoz Tello (right) stands outside her family's trailer in Palo Alto with her mother, Sandra, and 2-year-old sister, Cynthia.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 11:37 am

Sunny Palo Alto, Calif., is awash in multimillion-dollar homes, luxury Tesla electric cars and other financial fruits from a digital revolution the city helped spark. The Silicon Valley city is home to Stanford University, at least eight billionaires, and one mobile home park.

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Law
2:48 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Supreme Court Returns To Affirmative Action In Michigan Case

People wait in line for the beginning of the Supreme Court's new term on Oct. 7.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 10:12 am

The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of affirmative action again Tuesday, but this time the question is not whether race may be considered as a factor in college admissions. Instead, this case tests whether voters can ban affirmative action programs through a referendum.

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All Tech Considered
2:37 am
Tue October 15, 2013

A Company's Tweets Can Help Make It Creditworthy

Courtesy of Kabbage

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 1:25 pm

For many online and other small businesses, getting a loan or a big cash advance is tough. Banks and other traditional lenders are often leery of those without years of financial statements and solid credit scores.

But some lenders and other financial services companies are beginning to assess credit risk differently — using criteria you might not expect.

Jeffrey Grossman is an acupuncturist in Bellingham, Wash. He's also a small businessman. He creates media marketing materials for other acupuncturists hoping to expand their practice.

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8:20 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Businesses talk of adapting as lake levels remain at record lows

Lead in text: 
14-year stretch of below-average levels for Lake Michigan is longest ever recorded
In 1998, President Bill Clinton was embroiled in the Lewinsky sex scandal, the Detroit Red Wings won their ninth Stanley Cup, and Larry Page and Sergey Brin founded Google Inc. in Menlo Park, Calif. It was also the last year Lake Michigan water levels were at their long-term average height.
Read More: http://mibiz.com
8:13 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

State Treasurer says campaign finance investigation played no role in decision to resign

Lead in text: 
Andy Dillon says divorce and media scrutiny led to to stepping down
LANSING, MI -- Michigan Treasurer Andy Dillon, who tendered his resignation on Friday, continues to face questions over campaign finance reporting errors related to his 2010 gubernatorial campaign committee. The committee may have mishandled a $130,000 bank loan in July of 2010, violating the Michigan Campaign Finance Act, according to one of six error and ommission notices issued last month by the Bureau of Elections.
8:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Oshtemo Township residents complain about mailbox removal

Lead in text: 
Residents complain about "selective enforcement
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
OSHTEMO TOWNSHIP, MI -- Residents of a subdivision in Oshtemo Township are calling foul after several mailboxes were torn down by the Kalamazoo County Road Commission Monday to enforce its encroachment policy for non-conforming mailboxes. Among the mailboxes removed was NFL star Greg Jenning's unit, according to residents of the WestPort Trails subdivision.
Science
5:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Why Is Cheating In Science Research On The Rise?

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 6:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Cheating in science is not new, but the way it happens and the way it's detected are changing. There's a lot at stake in science research, everything from public health to valuable federal dollars.

And as Gigi Douban reports from Birmingham, Alabama, there are more people watching to keep researchers honest.

GIGI DOUBAN, BYLINE: About 60 science graduate students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are working in small groups on a quiz.

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Economy
5:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Three Americans Win Nobel Economics Prize

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 6:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics went to three American professors today. In announcing the honor, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the men all contribute to our understanding of how markets price things like stocks and homes. But as NPR's Dan Bobkoff reports, that doesn't mean the three economists always agree.

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Middle East
5:02 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Can Iran, The West Overcome Distrust To Make A Nuclear Deal?

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 6:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Tomorrow, nuclear negotiators for Iran and six world powers will meet in Geneva. It's a chance to see whether positive signals from Iran's new president can be translated into real progress at the table. Iran wants punitive sanctions lifted, but it's insisting on its right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that with hardliners waiting in the wings, momentum toward an agreement needs to be generated quickly.

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Local Music
3:55 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Brian Miller revives music of the northern lumber camps

Brian Miller & Randy Gosa
Credit Darin Back

Minnesota musician Brian Miller's most recent CD, The Falling of the Pine, is his second album of songs that were sung in the lumber camps across the northern states in the 19th and early 20th centuries. 

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Poetry
3:43 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Love Your Body Poetry Night promotes postive body image for women

A diagram from the trailer for 'Killing Us Softly,' a documentary by Jean Kilbourne.

The YWCA is holding a poetry night tomorrow to commemorate Love Your Body Day as well as Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The National Organization for Women started Love Your Body Day in 1988 to draw attention to ads and other media that negatively affect how women see their bodies.

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All Tech Considered
2:46 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Hey, Why Did You Floor It? Tracking Junior Behind The Wheel

Alyson Illich used technologies that tracked her son Colter's location while he was driving. "I think it made him more thoughtful," she said.
Family photo

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 6:19 pm

Nowhere is the temptation to use technology to monitor a child greater than when that child is learning to drive.

Auto accidents are still the leading cause of death among teens in the U.S. And while fatalities are dropping, giving a teen the keys to a car is still one of the most terrifying things most parents ever do.

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Science
2:41 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Are Iran's Centrifuges Just Few Turns From A Nuclear Bomb?

Former Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad inspects the Natanz nuclear plant in central Iran on March 8, 2007. The tall cylinders are centrifuges for enriching uranium.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 6:19 pm

Tuesday in Geneva, negotiators from six nations will sit down to talks with Iran over that country's nuclear program. At the heart of the negotiations are Iran's centrifuges: machines that can be used to enrich uranium for use in nuclear power plants, or for use in a bomb. This double role of centrifuges has negotiators in a bind.

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Arts & Life
2:29 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Bob Mondello Remembers Columbus Day 1963, And A Visit To Camelot

President John F. Kennedy enjoys a moment of levity at this Rose Garden ceremony marking Columbus Day, 1963.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 9:24 am

Fifty years ago, President Kennedy hosted a Columbus Day ceremony in the Rose Garden, and I was there. Fourteen-year-old me, with my family. This was a fluke. The President had cracked a politically uncool Mafia joke a few days before. Not wanting to offend Italian-American voters, the White House quickly mounted a charm offensive — inviting government workers like my dad, with Italian surnames like Mondello, to celebrate a great Italian explorer, with the president himself.

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Author Interviews
12:03 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

One-Stop Shop: Jeff Bezos Wants You To Buy 'Everything' On Amazon

An employee walks through an aisle at Amazon.com's 1.2 million-square foot fulfillment center in Phoenix, Ariz., in November 2012.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:51 pm

In his new book The Everything Store, Brad Stone chronicles how Amazon became an "innovative, disruptive, and often polarizing technology powerhouse." He writes that Amazon was among the first to realize the potential of the Internet and that the company "ended up forever changing the way we shop and read."

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Music Reviews
12:03 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

'The Blow' Puts An Artsy, Electro-Pop Spin On Attraction

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 11:04 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Our rock critic Ken Tucker has a review of the new album, "The Blow" by the music and performance are duo called The Blow which was conceived by its singer, Khaela Maricich. Melissa Dyne plays a more behind the scenes role, arranging, mixing and co-producing much of this new collection. The music made by The Blow can be broadly labeled as electro pop, but Ken says it goes further than that.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "A KISS")

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2014 election
9:25 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Kalamazoo County Commissioner launches campaign for state House

Brandt Iden
Credit Iden campaign website

Kalamazoo County Commissioner Brandt Iden says he will run for the state House next year. 

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Business
7:46 am
Mon October 14, 2013

3 American Economists Win Nobel Prize

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK, the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics was awarded today to three American men - Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen, Robert Shiller. The Nobel committee cited their research in the predictability of stock prices, as well as other asset prices. We're going to find out more now from Zoe Chace of NPR's Planet Money team. She's on the line. Hi, Zoe.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: Each of these guy's names is a little familiar, I think to the layman, especially maybe Shiller. Who are they?

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