Technology
3:14 am
Wed October 23, 2013

Happy Birthday, Copy Machine! Happy Birthday, Copy Machine!

The first modern photocopy
Xerox

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 2:37 pm

Copy machines can be found in every office, and most of us take them for granted. But 75 years ago, the technology that underpins the modern photocopier was used for the first time in a small apartment in Queens.

Inventor Chester Carlson used static electricity created with a handkerchief, light and dry powder to make the first copy on Oct. 22, 1938.

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StoryCorps
3:13 am
Wed October 23, 2013

A Father, A Daughter And Lessons Learned

Wil Smith with his daughter, Olivia, today.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 6:47 am

When we met Wil Smith last year, we learned that he and his daughter, Olivia, had been unlikely college roommates at Maine's Bowdoin College in the late '90s. At 27, not only was he older than the other students, but he was also a single dad raising an infant.

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Shots - Health News
3:13 am
Wed October 23, 2013

States' Refusal To Expand Medicaid May Leave Millions Uninsured

Protesters fill the Miami office of state Rep. Manny Diaz Jr. on Sept. 20 to protest his stance against expansion of health coverage in Florida.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 12:12 pm

President Obama on Tuesday appointed one of his top management gurus, Jeffrey Zeints, to head the team working to fix what ails HealthCare.gov, the troubled website that's supposed to allow residents of 36 states to enroll in coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

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We Are One
7:31 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

WestSouthwest: Battle Creek Enquirer e-book examines race and diversity in Battle Creek

Cover of "We Are One"
Credit Battle Creek Enquirer

Interview with Justin Hinkley and J.R. Reynolds

Battle Creek Enquirer reporter Justin Hinkley opens We Are One with a story about his fourth grade class at Post Elementary School. 

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The Two-Way
6:39 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

The Sounds Of New York City, Circa 1920

Times Square near 42nd Street in New York City, in the 1920s.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 7:59 pm

We can hear the music of the Roaring '20s anytime we want. But what if you could hear the day-to-day sounds of what it was like to live at that vibrant time?

That's the basis of Emily Thompson's project "The Roaring Twenties." She's a history professor at Princeton University who's been mapping the sounds of New York City in the late 1920s and early '30s.

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Around the Nation
6:21 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Funeral Contest Rewards Those Who Think Outside The Pine Box

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 7:13 pm

Melissa Block talks with Christine Pepper, CEO of the National Funeral Directors Association and judge for the Design for Death contest, about the competition and the winning entries.

Music Interviews
4:54 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Lucy Wainwright Roche: In The Family Business

Lucy Wainwright Roche.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 7:13 pm

Songs by Lucy Wainwright Roche seems to be told with a shrug, a note of apology, or modesty. And, yet, her father is the witty and acerbic singer-songwriter Loudon Wainwright III. Her mother is Suzzy Roche — one third of the harmonious Roche sisters.

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Law
4:54 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

How A County Clerk Ignited The Gay Marriage Debate In N.M.

Dona Ana County Clerk Lynn Ellins talks with Thom Hinks and Richard Sunman (far right) after they obtained a marriage license at the Dona Ana County Clerk's Office in Las Cruces, N.M. In August, Ellins' office began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.
Juan Carlos Llorca AP

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 12:51 pm

New Mexico law doesn't explicitly ban or approve same-sex marriage. There were a spate of lawsuits seeking to clarify the issue, but they were tied up in the courts. Then in August, the clerk of Dona Ana County, Lynn Ellins, a long-time supporter of same-sex marriage, consulted his staff.

"And we all agreed that it was about time to bring this thing to a head, and if we did nothing, the cases would languish in the district court if we did not move to issue these licenses and try and put the ball in play," Ellins says.

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Science
3:58 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Antibiotics Can't Keep Up With 'Nightmare' Superbugs

On Tuesday night, PBS' Frontline will investigate how decades of antibiotic overuse has led to the emergence of drug-resistant superbugs.
Courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:15 pm

We're used to relying on antibiotics to cure bacterial infections. But there are now strains of bacteria that are resistant to even the strongest antibiotics, and are causing deadly infections. According to the CDC, "more than 2 million people in the United States every year get infected with a resistant bacteria, and about 23,000 people die from it," journalist David Hoffman tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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3:30 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Upton to hold hearing on 'botched' online health care exchange

Lead in text: 
U.S. Representative for Michigan and committee chairman Fred Upton criticized the exchange saying it is not fair to make taxpayers pay for an expensive and inaccessible system.
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Calling the first weeks of the health-care rollout a "botched" effort, U.S. Rep. Fred Upton said the House Energy and Commerce Committee will hold hearings Thursday into the technological woes that have beset the federal government's online Marketplace since it went live Oct. 1.
3:12 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Is No Child Left Behind working? Education reform groups want to know

Lead in text: 
StudentsFirst and Democrats for Education Reform sent a letter to the U.S. Secretary of Education asking for test scores and graduation rates from No Child Left Behind states across the country. Michigan and several other states are due to renew waivers that bypass some of the requirements of the act.
LANSING -- With Michigan and other states approaching the end of their waivers from federal No Child Left Behind requirements, a coalition of several education reform groups is asking U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to require states to prove their efforts are working.
12:54 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

State Senate passes bills restricting Bridge Card use

Lead in text: 
State House is considering its own version of the legislation
The state Senate passed a package of six bills Tuesday that would restrict where people receiving public benefits can withdraw cash from ATMS using their Bridge cards. The bills cleared the Senate by six votes, 35-3, with Detroit Democratic Sens. Morris Hood, Virgil Smith and Coleman Young Jr. opposing.
Race
12:53 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On Untangling African-American History

The African Americans takes a global view of history.
Peter Simon

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 1:56 pm

The history of Africans in the Americas is a long and complicated one, filled with tragic twists and hopeful turns. Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. has taken on the task of telling the story in its entirety in the new PBS documentary The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.

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12:46 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

State regulators back new rules on fracking

Lead in text: 
Department of Environmental Quality officials acknowledge environmental groups' concerns
Lansing - Michigan's environmental regulators are rolling out new rules to ease growing concerns about the use of high-volume hydraulic fracturing to harvest natural gas. Two key changes will result in stronger emphasis on disclosing the chemicals used in the process, known as fracking, and protecting against damage to waterways and nearby wells.
Parenting
12:35 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Maryville Case: A Parent's Worst Nightmare

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Politics
12:35 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Bipartisan Group Slowed Down By Shutdown?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up in this program, states and cities across the country are facing major budget problems and so some leaders there are saying it's time to slash public pensions. We'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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Music Reviews
12:22 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

It's A Family Affair On Linda Thompson's 'Won't Be Long Now'

Linda Thompson's new album is called Won't Be Long Now.
Annabel Vere Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 3:58 pm

Linda Thompson is probably best known for the albums she recorded with her husband Richard Thompson in the '70s and early '80s. They divorced, and Thompson has maintained a sporadic solo career. Her new album is a family affair, featuring some accompaniment by her ex-husband, and some songs written with her son, the singer-songwriter Teddy Thompson.

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Parallels
12:19 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

In Russia's Vast Far East, Timber Thieves Thrive

The Chinese border town of Suifenhe is a port of entry for almost all of the hardwood coming from the Russian Far East. Russia is the world's largest exporter of timber, but illegal logging is a growing problem.
Courtesty of EIA

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 8:11 am

Forests cover about half of Russia's land mass, an environmental resource that President Vladimir Putin calls "the powerful green lungs of the planet."

But Putin himself acknowledges that Russia, the world's biggest exporter of logs, is having its timber stolen at an unprecedented rate.

The demand for high-value timber is fueling organized crime, government corruption and illegal logging in the Russian Far East. The hardwood cut in the endless forests often ends up as flooring and furniture in the United States, Europe, Japan and China.

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7:02 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Snyder to shut down NERD fund

Lead in text: 
Questions remain over who donated to fund
LANSING — Gov. Rick Snyder announced Monday he will close his NERD Fund, but controversy continued over his refusal to identify who gave more than $1.6 million to the nonprofit he formed after taking office in 2011. And the identity of the donors and other disclosure issues could continue to dog Snyder in the coming days and weeks.
6:52 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commissioners endorse countywide public transit plan

Lead in text: 
Target date of October 15, 2015 for regionalized public transit
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
Commissioners approved a resolution endorsing a transition plan to move public transit from a city-operated system, to a countywide system. The city and county have worked for several years on developing the countywide system.
Power outage
6:42 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Power outages Tuesday in Kalamazoo

File photo
Credit WMUK

Update October 22nd 7:40a.m. the outage map shows no existing outages in Kalamazoo. Power has apparently been restored. 

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Sports
5:55 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Fake Jerseys Work In A Pinch For Bogota Soccer Team

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Walk around any city in Colombia and you'll find vendors selling counterfeit soccer jerseys. That came in handy for Bogota's Independiente Santa Fe team. They showed up for an away game in the wrong color, so a team official bought knockoffs from vendors.

Strange News
5:52 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Man Goes Deer Hunting In Wal-Mart Parking Lot

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

You how it is with deer hunting, you have to get the right gear. You think about the time and place. You might build a deer stand, a kind of treehouse to shoot from high ground. Or you can do like a man in Indiana, Pennsylvania. He spotted a deer in the Wal-Mart parking lot and he shot it right there. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review says he got six months' probation, even though it was, in all fairness, the first day of hunting season when he opened fire.

Asia
5:35 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Human Rights Group Investigates Drone Strikes In Pakistan

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Amnesty International released a new report on Tuesday on U.S. drone strikes along Pakistan's chaotic border region with Afghanistan.

Parallels
5:35 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Election In Ultra-Orthodox Israeli Town Tests Gender Norms

Candidates for town council Michal Chernovitsky (left) and Adina Ruhamkin campaign in a park in El'ad, or Forever God, a small religious community in Israel. They could be the first women on El'ad's council, and the first ultra-Orthodox women to win public office in Israel.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun October 27, 2013 8:29 am

Voters across Israel choose new mayors and city councilors in local elections Tuesday. In one small town, a handful of ultra-Orthodox Jewish women are defying the norms of their community by running for office.

On a recent day, children mob two women in skirts, stockings and purple T-shirts in a neighborhood park in El'ad, or Forever God. The women are candidates for town council. As part of their get-the-word-out campaign, they're blowing up balloons for kids.

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NPR Story
5:35 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Australian Wildfires Threaten Sydney

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 6:53 am

Sydney, Australia, is suffering under a blanket of smoke and officials are sounding air quality alerts because of vast wildfires in the area. And it's still early in the fire season. Steve Inskeep talks to Stuart Cohen for the latest.

Around the Nation
3:46 am
Tue October 22, 2013

West Point Women: A Natural Pattern Or A Camouflage Ceiling?

At the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., the graduating class has been about 16 percent female since the institution first accepted women more than 30 years ago.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 11:53 am

At the 200-year-old U.S. Military Academy at West Point, tradition dictates everything. That includes the habit of having freshmen stand in the yard everyday and call cadets to lunch. It's also tradition that the overwhelming majority of the graduating class will be white and 84 percent male.

Some say those rates are due to natural patterns of matriculation.

"Women will naturally matriculate — or, they have naturally matriculated — into the academy at about the 16 to 17 percent rate," says West Point admissions director Col. Deborah McDonald.

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Author Interviews
3:24 am
Tue October 22, 2013

At Guantanamo, 'Sketching' Defendants, Witnesses And KSM's Nose

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed wore a camouflage vest to court. He argued that he was a warrior, and his lawyers convinced the judge to agree to let him wear paramilitary clothing to court.
Fantagraphics Books

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 3:45 pm

When the 2006 secretive military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay began, only one courtroom sketch artist was allowed in. Her name is Janet Hamlin.

The Associated Press sent her there. Since then, Hamlin has created a rare visual record of the human drama unfolding in Guantanamo's courtrooms. Those images are now collected in a book, Sketching Guantanamo.

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StoryCorps
3:24 am
Tue October 22, 2013

For A Father With Alzheimer's, Life 'Came Down To Love'

Priya Morganstern (left) and Bhavani Jaroff visited a StoryCorps booth with their father, Ken Morganstern, in 2006. He passed away a year later.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 10:19 am

Five years after Ken Morganstern was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, he sat down with his daughters Priya Morganstern and Bhavani Jaroff to talk about some of the memories he had left.

At 81, he couldn't see and he needed some prompting from time to time, but family stayed strong in his memory.

He remembered that his dad was an easygoing guy, nicknamed "Happy Harry." "I had a lot of his characteristics, I think," he said.

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