Politics
7:36 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Some In Congress Have Behaved Badly From The Start

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 9:59 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The shutdown of the U.S. government has sparked lots of finger-pointing and name calling in Congress. But our friend A.J. Jacobs says this is hardly the nastiest dispute in the history of our democracy. A.J., an editor-at-large at Esquire Magazine - until they come to their senses - joins us now from New York. A.J., thanks so much for being with us.

A.J. JACOBS: Thank you for having me.

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The Salt
6:07 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Women, The 'First Brewers,' Lean Into Craft Beer-Making

Meg Gill is the president and co-founder of Golden Road Brewing in Los Angeles. Her brewery is favored to win awards at the Great American Beer Festival.
Melissa Kuypers NPR

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 10:09 am

Thousands of beer aficionados are in Denver this weekend for the Great American Beer Festival. Some 600 breweries from around the country are represented at the marquee event for the craft-brewing industry.

And while this annual competition has long been male-dominated, that's starting to change.

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StoryCorps
6:02 am
Sat October 12, 2013

With Veteran's Life In Peril, His Parents Take Up The Fight

The Schei family in 2010 (from left): Anneka, Gordon, Erik, Deven and Christine.
Courtesy of the Schei family

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:28 pm

In October 2005, 21-year-old Army Sgt. Erik Schei was shot in the head during his second tour in Iraq. The bullet shattered the top half of his skull.

Christine and Gordon Schei got the phone call about their son's injury at around 4 a.m. Christine Schei says her husband was "white as a sheet" and shaking after answering.

A sniper had struck their son; a bullet "entered above his right ear and exited above his left," Gordon Schei says.

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It's All Politics
6:01 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Would The U.S. Be Better Off With A Parliament?

A view of the German Bundestag, or federal Parliament, in Berlin.
Michael Sohn AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 3:31 pm

There are many reasons for the gridlock in Washington. Some are recent developments, as the U.S. becomes more politically polarized. Others are structural, built into the American political system.

Regardless, the extreme paralysis that has recently become the norm in D.C. almost never happens in Western European democracies.

"You're asking: Do other democracies have this problem? And the answer is: Not many," says Jane Mansbridge, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Electronic Music's Godfather Isn't Done Innovating

Morton Subotnick performs at New York's La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club in 2004. The pioneering electronic composer recently created a mobile app for children.
Jack Vartoogian Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:05 am

Morton Subotnick could fairly be called electronic music's first hitmaker. His 1967 album Silver Apples of the Moon was an international sensation. Or, in his words, "It was like a bombshell."

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The Salt
7:27 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutdown Leaves Some Seniors Worried About Their Next Meal

Seniors around the country depend on weekly deliveries of nutritionally balanced food from the USDA's supplemental nutrition program.
tmarvin iStockPhoto.com

You've no doubt heard of Senior Meals on Wheels preparing hot meals delivered to the elderly. But there's a different meal program that's been put on hold because of the partial government shutdown. It's the USDA's Commodity Supplemental Food Program.

In Michigan's western Kent County alone, more than 1,300 low-income seniors depend on the program. For them, it's a nutrition lifeline: They can't just go to a food pantry for similar assistance.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

Carl reads three news-related limericks...Not Feline Fine, Pawn Police, Treble Trickery.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 11:42 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the new Nobel Prize awarded for? Brian Babylon.

BRIAN BABYLON: It's going to be a super duper peace prize given to each American for putting up with Congress' crap.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Jessi Klein.

JESSI KLEIN, COMEDIAN: There will be a Nobel Prize for twerking.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Luke Burbank.

LUKE BURBANK: The Nobel Prize for open letter to Miley Cyrus.

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It's All Politics
5:56 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutdown Takes A Toll On GOP In Virginia Governor's Race

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:38 pm

With the government shutdown now in its 11th day, polls show that voters think Republicans bear the biggest share of the blame.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in Virginia — a state that's home to some 172,000 federal civilian workers and where federal spending is a big part of the economy. In the race to be Virginia's next governor, GOP candidate Ken Cuccinelli is falling in the polls.

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Movie Interviews
5:56 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'The Square' Tightens Lens On Egypt's Revolution

Ahmed Hassan is the leader of the group of young Egyptian revolutionaries at the center of The Square.
Noujaim Films

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:56 pm

The new documentary The Square — set in Cairo's Tahrir Square — is a gripping, visceral portrait of the 2011 Egyptian revolution and its tumultuous aftermath.

The film puts the audience directly in the middle of the protests, and follows the lives of several young revolutionaries over the two and half years since. It charts their journey from the early euphoria of victory to the depths of despair as those victories unravel amid violent clashes and profound political confrontations among the secular revolutionaries, the Muslim Brotherhood and the military.

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Technology
4:36 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutting Down Government Websites Is No Small Endeavor

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

One of the side effects of the government shutdown is the closure of many federal websites. The big ones, like the IRS and the White House, are still up and running. But there are others that have shut down, such as those of NASA or the Library of Congress. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports that while shutting the sites is likely to save money in the short run, it could create hassles down the road.

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Sports
4:36 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Remembering One Of Boxing's Storied Bouts

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

One final note on that famous title fight between Liston and Ali. The legendary anchor punch that Mike mentioned is also known as the phantom punch. That's because many in the crowd didn't see it land and certainly didn't think that one quick punch could have dropped a man Liston's size. Even Ali seemed surprised. To this day, many wonder if the fight was fixed. After the fight, Ali headed over to broadcaster Steve Ellis and asked to see a replay.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

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Code Switch
4:36 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Fetch Clay, Make Man': Ali, Fetchit And The 'Anchor Punch'

In 1965, Muhammad Ali and Lincoln Perry (Stepin Fetchit) teamed up in pursuit of a legendary boxing technique: the anchor punch.
Courtesy of New York Theatre Workshop

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:38 pm

---

Muhammad Ali's first title defense, a first-round TKO of Sonny Liston in 1965, propelled Ali to the status of icon. In Ali's training camp before the fight was an icon from an earlier era: Lincoln Perry. He was the first African-American movie star, who went by the stage name Stepin Fetchi. The relationship between the two men is the subject of an off-Broadway play called Fetch Clay, Make Man.

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Books
4:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Coming Clean' About Growing Up In A Hoarding Household

Kimberly Rae Miller grew up among piles of junk. Doors wouldn't close, stacks of paper turned to sludge, and the pool was filled with brown muck. Her father was a hoarder — in the most extreme kind of way. Host Michel Martin talks to Miller about how she coped, which is detailed in her memoir, Coming Clean. This segment initially aired July 29, 2013 on Tell Me More.

Music
4:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

For R&B's Ron Isley, Music Is 'Just Like Magic'

Ron Isley has been R&B royalty for more than half a century. He began his musical career as one of the Isley Brothers, recording hits like "Shout," before embarking on a successful solo career. Host Michel Martin talks with Isley about his long career, and new album This Song is For You. This segment initially aired July 16, 2013 on Tell Me More.

Education
4:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Pledge Of Allegiance Past Its Prime?

Millions of American school children begin the day with the pledge of allegiance. But do they, or their teachers, really understand what it means? Host Michel Martin discusses the issue with journalist Mary Plummer, of KPCC, and Peter Levine, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

2:50 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Michigan state treasurer resigns

Lead in text: 
State treasurer Andy Dillon did not give a reason for why he’s leaving, but the Gongwer News Service says they expect an announcement later this afternoon. Dillon testified in the Detroit bankruptcy case deposition yesterday where he answered questions about his actions leading up to the bankruptcy filing.
A parent's ability to decline or delay vaccinations for their child based on philosophical reasons, as well as other unidentifiable reasons, ranks the state near the bottom of the barrel for children with immunizations, and in effect is why there are outbreaks of such preventable diseases, physicians told the Senate Health Policy Committee on Thursday.
Faith Matters
12:37 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Elizabeth Smart: My Faith And 'My Story'

Elizabeth Smart says she never lost faith during her nine-month captivity.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 4:56 pm

Elizabeth Smart was just 14 years old when she was kidnapped at knifepoint from her Salt Lake City home in 2002. She was held captive for nine months and forced to act as Brian David Mitchell's second wife. He raped her nearly every day and told her that the ordeal was ordained by God.

Smart says there were moments when she felt there was no one to turn to — except God. She writes about how her Mormon faith played a key part in her survival in her new memoir, My Story.

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Author Interviews
12:33 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Parenting A Child Who's Fallen 'Far From The Tree'

iStockphoto.com

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 12, 2012.

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Health Care
12:29 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

In Mississippi, Bankruptcy Follows Broken Legs

According to a recent study, more than half of the Mississippians who file for bankruptcy do so because they cannot pay their medical bills. Clarion Ledger reporter Jerry Mitchell tells host Michel Martin what's causing such devastating costs.

Barbershop
12:29 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Is 'Hip-Hop' Mayor's Sentence About Politics Or Justice?

Former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was sentenced to 28 years in prison for corruption. But do the Barbershop guys think the sentence was too stiff? They weigh in on that and the week's other top stories.

Movie Reviews
12:11 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

A Pirate Saga More Sobering Than Swashbuckling

Barkhad Abdi (middle) plays Muse, the leader of a band of Somali pirates who take over a freighter in Captain Phillips.
Hopper Stone Columbia Pictures

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 1:52 pm

Most kidnapping melodramas have final scenes — after their climaxes — that are, effectively, throwaways. There are sighs of relief, tearful reunions with families, cameras that dolly back on domestic tableaux to suggest the world has at last been righted.

I think it's telling that in Captain Phillips the most overwhelming scene is after the resolution, in the infirmary of a ship. So much terror and moral confusion has gone down — so much pain — that the cumulative tension can't be resolved by violence. The movie's grip remains strong even when it cuts to black.

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WMU East Campus
12:09 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

WMU Alumni Association approves $1-million for new alumni center

WMU East Hall - file photo
Credit WMUK

The Board of Directors of Western Michigan University's Alumni Association has approved $1-million toward the cost of renovating East Hall into an alumni center. 

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Local Music
11:28 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Western swing band premieres new album, new name

Chuck Whiting and His Rowdy Friends
Credit Chuck Whiting

If you want to hear Kalamazoo band Chuck Whiting and His Rowdy Friends, Friday night at 7 p.m. at the Kalamazoo Valley Museum might be your last chance. But Whiting says the group isn’t going away, just the name.

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Shots - Health News
11:03 am
Fri October 11, 2013

California Trains Helpers To Meet Demand For Health Insurance

Edward Avalos, one of the first certified enrollment specialists in California, is a very busy man.
Sarah Varney Kaiser Health News

Luisa Blue, head of the local Service Employees International Union in San Jose, Calif., has five more months to spend $1 million. The union received a grant from Covered California, the state's health insurance marketplace, to educate the public about the exchange.

SEIU is using some of the money to call people in their homes at night and on the weekend. "Over 4,000 (people) have said tell me more about Covered California and how can I enroll to get health insurance," Blue says of the union's first two weeks on the case.

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Fine Art
10:35 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Spare Change: The art of climate

Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

The exhibit Spare Change: The art of climate will be on the first floor of Western Michigan University’s Kohrmann Hall until Thursday, October 17th. It has everything from a dress made of recycled materials to simple eye-catching info graphics like Amelia James work. 

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7:25 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Michigan Municipal League plan would help cities fund infrastructure and services

Lead in text: 
Local and state government leaders haven't been able to reach consensus on changing how revenue is collected
LANSING - An expanded sales tax, increased gas tax and forgivable student loans are among Michigan Municipal League's ideas for boosting the economy and fixing local finance problems. Local governments have for years slashed staff and struggled to fund basic services as state revenue sharing declined, property values plummeted and laws limited municipalities' ability to collect new tax revenue.
Religion
7:13 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Vatican Recalls Pope Medallions Because Of Typo

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. To commemorate the new pope, the Vatican minted thousands of medallions in gold, silver and bronze. A portrait of Francis was on one side and on the other, the Latin phrase that inspired Pope Francis to join the Jesuit order and become a priest. The medals went on sale this week and were promptly recalled after the Vatican discovered a typo: Jesus was misspelled as Lesus, with an L. One wit tweeted: I blame the Lesuits. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:06 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Your Chance To Lash Out At Congress

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a chance to say what you think. Amid the federal shutdown, a website called DrunkDialCongress.org offers an outlet for frustration. You enter your phone number and get a call with a message.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: When I drink I like to tell people what's on my mind. So in a minute, we're going to forward you to a member of the House of Representatives.

INSKEEP: You're connected to the office of a randomly chosen member of Congress, though you must supply alcohol yourself.

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