6:10 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Stryker Corporation reports net earnings drop of 34% in second quarter

Lead in text: 
Company's earning per share failed to meet Wall Street projections
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Stryker Corp. is reporting a 34 percent drop in net earnings in the second quarter as the company continues to suffer from product recalls and volatile foreign exchange rates. Net earnings fell 34.5 percent to $213 million compared to $325 million last year.
Around the Nation
6:00 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Costume-Clad Comic-Con Fans Descend On San Diego

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Some 130,000 fans are converging on the convention center in San Diego for this year's Comic-Con, the world's largest pop culture convention. One big draw will be the appearance of fantasy writer Neil Gaiman who, after a long hiatus, is bringing back his best-selling comic Sandman. Here to tell us what she's seeing so far is Gina McIntyre. She's the editor of Hero Complex, the pop culture blog at the Los Angeles Times. Good morning.

GINA MCINTYRE: Good morning.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Fri July 19, 2013

A Year After Colo. Shooting, Trial Still Far Off

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Sports
5:52 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Tour De France Racers Want To Leave Shadow Of Doping Behind

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

After three weeks and more than 2,000 miles, the Tour de France finishes up on Sunday in Paris. The race is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. It's also the first year in many that no former winners are suspected of doping. Seven-time tour winner Lance Armstrong finally admitted to doping this past spring, ending a years-long saga.

But even after all that, doping is probably not fini - as NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris.

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Race
5:52 am
Fri July 19, 2013

40 Years Later, A Black-And-White Photo Gets New Life

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:38 am

The Trayvon Martin-George Zimmerman case and the issues of race surrounding it got photographer Joseph Crachiola thinking about a picture he took almost 40 years ago of a group of black and white children playing happily together in the streets of a Detroit suburb. Renee Montagne talks to Crachiola about the photo, which has gone viral since he posted it on Facebook after the Zimmerman verdict.

Europe
5:52 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Russian Opposition Leader Convicted Amid Controversy

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:00 am

A Russian court has convicted one of the country's most prominent opposition leaders of embezzlement. Alexei Navalny faces a sentence of five years in prison in a controversial case that he says was trumped up to derail his political career. Navalny was instrumental in organizing mass protests against the rule of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Business
5:26 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Federal Judge Green Lights Suit Against Private Equity Firms

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:00 am

The investor lawsuit claims the companies, including Blackstone, Carlyle and Bain Capital, colluded to drive down prices on hundreds of billions of dollars in takeovers.

Business
5:26 am
Fri July 19, 2013

In Dubai, Weight Loss Is Worth Gold

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 7:06 am

If you want people to slim down, why not reward them with gold? That's the tack being taken in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. For every kilogram lost, the government will pay out a gram of gold.

U.S.
4:41 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Pa. City Tries Wild West Auction To Rope In Cash

A Harrisburg Wild West artifact sits inside of a warehouse building owned by the city, seen here in 2011.
Craig Layne WITF

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:43 am

Leaders in Harrisburg, Pa., hope the legends of the Wild West will ride to the rescue of the cash-strapped state capital. Thanks to a former mayor's eccentric, failed museum project, the city has an extensive collection of Wild West artifacts — some said to have ties to people like Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and Buffalo Bill.

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Code Switch
3:26 am
Fri July 19, 2013

How To Fight Racial Bias When It's Silent And Subtle

Researchers say it may be possible to temporarily reduce racial biases.
Images.com Corbis

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 8:00 pm

In the popular imagination and in conventional discourse — especially in the context of highly charged news events such as the shooting of Trayvon Martin — prejudice is all about hatred and animosity.

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StoryCorps
3:23 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Grandpa's Story: A Comb, Penknife And Handkerchief

Leonard Carpenter in Kentucky, where he grew up, in the early 1940s.
Photo courtesy of Lynne Bruschetti

Jack Bruschetti was born in 1999, the same year his grandfather, Leonard Carpenter, died from Alzheimer's disease.

But 13-year-old Jack wanted to know more about his grandfather, who worked as a tire builder for BFGoodrich in Akron, Ohio, where he also raised his family.

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Shots - Health News
3:23 am
Fri July 19, 2013

White House Muddles Obamacare Messaging — Again

President Obama walks off the stage after speaking about the Affordable Care Act during an event in the East Room of the White House on Thursday. Obama argued that the law is holding insurance companies accountable and putting money back into the pockets of consumers.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 6:13 am

This summer was supposed to be a time to reintroduce the public to the Affordable Care Act and teach people how to sign up for benefits this fall.

But that's not what's happening.

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Theatre
12:09 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Could this be the end of Shakespeare in the Park?

The cast of The Comedy of Errors at Shakespeare in the Park in Portage
Credit Fred Western, Universal Photographic Services,Inc.

If you haven’t been to Shakespeare in the Park in Portage before, this weekend may be your last chance. The Comedy of Errors will be performed at the Celery Flats Amphitheatre in Portage, Thursday through Sunday. The City of Portage is cutting funding for its entire summer entertainment series, which includes concerts, movie nights, and the all-volunteer Shakespeare troupe.

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The Record
12:05 am
Fri July 19, 2013

20 Years Ago, Tupac Broke Through

Tupac Shakur on the set of Poetic Justice.
Everett Collection / Rex USA

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 7:37 pm

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Dance
12:01 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Fast feet, curly wigs, and straight arms: Learn more about Irish dance

The Sheila Tully School of Irish Dance at a St. Patrick's Day Parade in Chicago, 2007.
Credit AP Images

The Quinn School of Irish Dance will perform this weekend at the Blackrock Medieval Festival at Olde World Village in Augusta. Erin Quinn opened the studio 12 years ago where Irish step dancing classes are held year-round. She says not many people realize the school is here or that it’s one of only four schools in Michigan that is certified to compete internationally by a dance commission in Ireland.

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8:34 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Speaker says local governments need to seek new revenue, despite state regulation

Lead in text: 
Plante Moran study finds local governments limited from raising adequate levels of revenue
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - County and local government is the most regulated industry in the entire state, an expert said today at presentation on local government finances sponsored by Southwest Michigan First. Current state law severely curtails revenue growth at the local level, which has created a need to find new revenue.
8:21 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Detroit files for Chapter 9 bankruptcy

Lead in text: 
Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr says city services will continue, bills we be paid
Detroit- Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr said at a late afternoon press conference with Mayor Dave Bing that he hopes the city emerges from bankruptcy by late summer or early fall of next year.
Arts & Life
6:37 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Civil War's First African-American Infantry Remembered In Bronze

Boston's Shaw Memorial sits at the corner of Beacon and Park Streets.
Andrea Shea WBUR

The Shaw Memorial, by American sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, stands 11 feet by 14 feet, like a giant bronze diorama, on the corner of Boston Common. In it, 40 or so black soldiers march to war alongside their white colonel, Robert Gould Shaw, on horseback.

The statue memorializes the first African-American volunteer infantry unit of the Civil War, the 54th Massachusetts Regiment, which was crushed 150 years ago Thursday in a battle at Fort Wagner in South Carolina.

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Environment
5:15 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Wildfires Will Worsen, And Further Strain The Forest Service

An aircraft lays down a line of fire retardant between a wildfire and homes in the dry, densely wooded Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, Colo., on June 13.
John Wark AP

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 11:13 pm

The deaths of 19 firefighters near Yarnell, Ariz., this summer have focused a lot of attention on just how bad wildfire has become in the West. And research predicts the situation is going to get worse.

Over the past decade, the region has seen some of the worst fire seasons on record. In addition to lives lost, the fires have cost billions in terms of lost property and in taxpayer money spent fighting the blazes.

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The Two-Way
5:07 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Detroit Files For Bankruptcy

Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 4:32 am

(This story last updated at 6:45 p.m. ET)

The city of Detroit has filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history, seeking Chapter 9 protection from creditors and unions owed some $18.5 billion in debt and liabilities.

In a news conference on Thursday, Detroit Mayor Dave Bing said he didn't want to go into bankruptcy, but the city will now "have to make the best of it."

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Around the Nation
5:07 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

South Boston Transformed In Whitey Bulger's Absence

Four decades after James "Whitey" Bulger first rose to power, "Southie" is not what it used to be. The once blue-collar, Irish-Catholic neighborhood is now an ethnic melting pot that has been invaded by young urban professionals who have gentrified the area and smoothed out its once-rough edges.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:31 pm

When the FBI brought reputed mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger back to his old stomping ground of South Boston to be tried in federal court after 16 years on the lam, he must have done a double take. The neighborhood that Bulger is accused of terrorizing with murders and extortion is booming.

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Energy
4:12 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Carbon Tax Gaining Popularity, But Not With Lawmakers

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:31 pm

The idea of taxing carbon emissions to curb climate change has been gaining surprisingly diverse and bipartisan support over the past year. Everywhere, that is, except Congress.

U.S.
4:12 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Furloughs Cut Into Classtime At U.S. Military Bases

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:31 pm

Civilian furloughs have begun at U.S. military installations worldwide. The mandatory days off without pay, prompted by the current round of budget cuts known as sequestration, are looming over Defense Department-run schools that serve the children of military families. For teachers at the nation's most populous Army base, Fort Bragg, cuts mean no new textbooks and a loss of school days.

Around the Nation
4:12 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Where Are All Of Wyomings Escalators?

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:51 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Turning now to escalator news, specifically Wyoming escalator news.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

There is a reported paucity of moving staircases in the Cowboy State, and that shortcoming has been posited as an argument for Wyoming to have fewer than its allotted pair of senators.

CORNISH: The argument goes like this: Why should a state with only two escalators get two senators?

BLOCK: Well, for some insight, we turn to the self-proclaimed escalator editor of the Casper, Wyoming Star-Tribune.

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Shots - Health News
3:37 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

World's Biggest Virus May Have Ancient Roots

Pandoraviruses were discovered lurking in the mud of Chile and Australia, half a world apart.
courtesy of Chantal Abergel and Jean-Michel Claverie

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 6:14 am

Researchers have discovered the largest virus ever, and they've given it a terrifying name: Pandoravirus.

In mythology, opening Pandora's Box released evil into the world. But there's no need to panic. This new family of virus lives underwater and doesn't pose a major threat to human health.

"This is not going to cause any kind of widespread and acute illness or epidemic or anything," says Eugene Koonin, an evolutionary biologist at the National Institutes of Health who specializes in viruses.

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WMU Board of Trustees
3:15 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

WMU moves ahead with Cooley Law School affiliation

Protesters outside of Thursday's Board of Trustees meeting call for Western Michigan University to reconsider plans for its east campus
Credit WMUK

  The Thomas M. Cooley Law School will soon have a new name. 

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The Two-Way
3:03 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Man Who Hoped To Testify Against Whitey Bulger Is Found Dead

Stephen Rakes as he arrived at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Boston on June 12 for the first day of the "Whitey" Bulger's trial.
Brian Snyder Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:31 pm

Stephen "Stippo" Rakes, who claimed that notorious Boston gangster James "Whitey" Bulger forced him — at gunpoint — to sell a liquor store in 1984, was found dead Wednesday in Lincoln, Mass.

According to the Middlesex (Mass.) District Attorney's office, "there were no obvious signs of trauma. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner is conducting an autopsy to determine the cause and manner of death."

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Pop Culture
1:40 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Maria Bamford: A Seriously Funny Comedian

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 3:05 pm

It's almost uncomfortable to laugh at Maria Bamford's comedy, because so much of it is about really serious problems she has: OCD, bipolar disorder, suicidal thoughts. She's been hospitalized several times. But you have to laugh, because she's that funny.

In addition to the difficulties from which she suffers, Bamford — who has a new comedy CD out called Ask Me About My New God! — incorporates her family into much of her material. She's close to both her parents, in part, she says, because they've been through so much together.

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Book Reviews
1:40 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

The Only Surprise In Rowling's 'Cuckoo's Calling' Is The Author

J.K. Rowling recently revealed herself to be the author of the mystery novel The Cuckoo's Calling.
Ben Pruchnie Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 3:41 pm

Call it "The Mystery of the Missing Book Sales" — and I don't think we'll be needing to bring Sherlock Holmes in to solve this one. In April, a debut mystery called The Cuckoo's Calling was published. It appeared to be written by an unknown British writer named Robert Galbraith, who was identified on the book jacket as a former military cop now working in private security.

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1:24 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Democrat announces in 7th Congressional District

Lead in text: 
Byrnes ran in a Democratic primary for State Senate in 2010 but lost. Walberg is in his third term in Congress.
WASHINGTON - Former state Rep. Pam Byrnes announced today she'll run for Congress next year, hoping to take the seat currently helped by U.S. Rep. Tim Walberg, R-Tipton. Byrnes, a Chelsea Democrat, served six years in the state House of Representatives before being forced out by term limits.

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