NPR Story
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Georgia Hospital System Partners With Royal Philips

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Companies that make medical equipment operate largely on a supply-and-demand model. Hospitals buy their multimillion- dollar machines, use them for a few years, and then go shopping again. In some cases, manufacturers have designed entire medical systems within a hospital.

Now, in what appears to be a first-of-its-kind partnership in the United States, a tech giant - Royal Philips - and a hospital system in Georgia are sharing financial risk and reward. Jim Burress reports from WABE in Atlanta.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

New York Hosts Major League All-Star Game

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The best players in major league baseball take the field tonight in New York. Fans voted for their favorites in the American and National Leagues. The All-Star game is an exhibition - or mostly an exhibition - and there is a real prize. The winner gets home-field advantage during the World Series. The game also offers a chance to check on how teams are doing midway through the season.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Here to talk all things baseball is NPR's Mike Pesca. Good morning.

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NPR Story
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Vicious Cartel Leader Arrested In Mexico

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

One of the most brutal and vicious cartel leaders in Mexico has been arrested. Early yesterday morning, Mexican marines, caught the leader of the notorious Zeta gang organization. The country has killed or captured dozens of kingpins in recent years without managing to bring an end to the high murder rates in many areas.

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Jessica Naudziunas is Harvest Public Media's connection to central Missouri, working out of the KBIA offices in Columbia, Mo. She joined Harvest in July 2010. Jessica has spent time on NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday and WNYC's Soundcheck, and reported and produced for WNIN-FM in Evansville, Ind. She grew up in the city of Chicago, studied at the University of Tulsa and has helped launch local food gardens in Oklahoma and Indiana.

Books News & Features
3:17 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Use The Books, Fans: 'Star Wars' Franchise Thrives In Print

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:56 am

There's been a frenzy of excitement since last year when Disney bought Lucasfilm, creator of the Star Wars franchise, and announced it would make more Star Wars movies. Fans are eagerly awaiting hints of what might happen next in the story, and one way the franchise keeps fans interested is through a pantheon of Star Wars books, the latest of which is Troy Denning's Star Wars: Crucible.

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Animals
3:16 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Om Nom Nom: T. Rex Was, Indeed, A Voracious Hunter

Mind The Teeth: Fossils indicate that Tyrannosaurus rex was an active hunter, in addition to being a scavenger. And in Jurassic Park, it also had a sweet tooth for lawyers.
Universal Pictures Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:44 am

Tyrannosaurus rex is perhaps one of the most famous animals to have ever roamed the Earth. This huge, fierce meat-eater has graced Hollywood films as the perpetual villain, and it has played a notorious role in the science community that studies it, too.

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Shots - Health News
3:15 am
Tue July 16, 2013

South Africa Weighs Starting HIV Drug Treatment Sooner

A woman waits to get AIDS drugs on April 8 at a clinic in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, about 55 miles north of Johannesburg. New WHO guidelines say patients should start HIV treatment much earlier, before they become extremely sick.
Stephane de Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

The World Health Organization has issued revised guidelines saying that people with HIV should be put on antiviral drugs far earlier than was previously recommended. The hope is that most patients would get started on treatment before they begin to get extremely sick.

It's a move that could have huge implications for African nations where millions of people are infected with HIV. In South Africa roughly 5.5 million people are living with HIV — more than any other country in the world. South Africa also has more people in treatment than anywhere else.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Robert Randolph Ushers In Steel-Guitar Soul With 'Lickety Split'

Robert Randolph & The Family Band's new album, Lickety Split, is out Tuesday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

The 33-year-old frontman of Robert Randolph & The Family Band has strong roots in gospel music. As a kid, he grew up attending the House of God church in Orange, N.J. That's where he first played the "sacred steel" guitar, a driving force behind the band's soulful new album, Lickety Split.

In the 1920s, African-American Pentecostal churches began using the steel guitar in place of an organ. From there, it became an instrument that helped usher in a new gospel style.

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Local Music
10:33 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Musicians of The Soil and The Sun rise to new heights

Credit The Soil and The Sun

The Grand Rapids band The Soil and The Sun will finish out their tour Friday night at 9:30 p.m. at Bell’s Brewery in Kalamazoo. The band was one of NPR’s top picks at South by Southwest music festival last year in Austin, Texas, and recently played Common Ground Music Fest in Grand Rapids.

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8:36 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Detroit Emergency Manager reaches agreement with some creditors, but no details are released

Lead in text: 
Spokesman for Kevyn Orr says deal should be signed "in next day or two"
Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr has reached a settlement with unnamed creditors, according to federal court filings in a lawsuit against a financial insurer his office sued to block from accessing $11 million a month in tax revenue from the city's three casinos.
8:28 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commission approves rezoning properties near WMU campus

Lead in text: 
Developers plan retail and apartments for property on West Michigan Avenue
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Eleven parcels near Western Michigan University will be demolished to make way for a planned four-story retail and apartment building after the Kalamazoo City Commission voted unanimously to approve the project at a public hearing Monday. No comments were made regarding the project by the public or commissioners during the hearing.
Around the Nation
8:21 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

A Peek Inside A Once Top Secret Spot In Atomic Age History

Take a tour of the Hanford site, a nuclear production complex in Richland, Wash., and you'll see the hundreds of mechanical water pressure gauges wired to the process tubes inside the core. Tour guide Paul Vinther warns that bumping these gauges could throw off the readings enough to trigger a an emergency shutdown of the reactor.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:40 am

People tend to remember that the atomic bomb was developed at Los Alamos, N.M., and Oak Ridge, Tenn., but they often forget about a third nuclear production complex — the Hanford Site in Richland, Wash. It's where they built the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor.

The "B Reactor" is a windowless, cinder block hulk out in the middle of nowhere. You might mistake it for an abandoned cement plant. But inside, it's a lovingly preserved time capsule of the Atomic Age. If you're lucky, your guide will be one of the people who worked here when the place was still new.

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Books News & Features
6:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Aparecium! J.K. Rowling Revealed As 'Cuckoo' Mystery Author

Rowling says writing under a pseudonym was a "liberating experience."
Debra Hurford Brown

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:54 pm

It's a detective story — about a detective story. The book in question is The Cuckoo's Calling, a debut novel released earlier this year by a former British military man named Robert Galbraith.

The reviews were excellent — especially for a first novel. There was just one hitch: The Cuckoo's Calling wasn't a debut at all. Nor was it by Robert Galbraith. As The Sunday Times revealed this weekend, Galbraith is a pseudonym for one of the best-known writers working today: Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling.

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Race
6:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Zimmerman Verdict Feels Personal For Some In Service Sorority

Attorney General Eric Holder greets Alexis Margaret Herman, member of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority, before speaking at the organization's convention.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:54 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder looked out over a sea of women in red on Monday and invoked his wife, a member of the influential African-American sorority Delta Sigma Theta. Holder was addressing the sorority's national convention in its centennial year.

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Books News & Features
5:37 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

How Scholastic Sells Literacy To Generations Of New Readers

Scholastic started out in 1920 as a four-page magazine written for high school students. Above, an early issue published in September 1922.
Courtesy of Scholastic

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:13 pm

Chances are you have had contact with Scholastic Publishing at some point in your life: You might have read their magazines in school, or bought a book at one of their book fairs, or perhaps you've read Harry Potter or The Hunger Games? From its humble beginning as publisher of a magazine for high schoolers, Scholastic has become a $2 billion business and one of the biggest children's book publishers in the world.

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The Salt
5:18 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

The Secret To Georgian Grilled Meats? Grapevines And Lots Of Wine

Shashlik cooks on a hot grill. Kakheti, the easternmost province in the Republic of Georgia, is known for meats grilled over grapevines, which burn quickly, leaving a heap of finger-sized coals.
Nick Grabowski via Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 3:27 pm

Tucked between Russia and Turkey, the Republic of Georgia is renowned for great food: cheese dishes, pickles, breads and stews. This is a cuisine that you should not miss.

And on summer evenings in the capital, Tbilisi, the air is fragrant with the smells of one of Georgian cookery's highlights: grilled meat, or shashlik.

You can find good shashlik at restaurants with white tablecloths, but the very best in all Tbilisi is said to be at a roadside stop called Mtsvadi Tsalamze. It's an unassuming place with rows of wooden picnic tables in an open yard.

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The Salt
5:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Argentina, Coca-Cola Tests Market For 'Green' Coke

Coca-Cola Life, a new product being rolled out in Argentina with a green label, is being marketed as a "natural" and therefore lower-calorie cola.
Coca-Cola

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:40 pm

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Durrie Bouscaren joined IPR as Cedar Rapids Reporter in March of 2013.

Bouscaren first fell in love with public radio while working for WAER at Syracuse University. She received recognition from the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association for her work reporting on Syracuse’s Southern Sudanese community. Bouscaren later covered Central New York for WRVO Public Media, and discussed everything from urban blight to the economics of snowmobiles. In the summer of 2012 Bouscaren interned for KQED in San Francisco, where she completed a freelance project about homeless youth in Oakland. Her work has also aired on WBEZ's Front and Center.

Bouscaren's favorite public radio program is Planet Money.

Around the Nation
4:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Critics: Immigration Reform Takes Jobs Away From Black Workers

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hundreds of people from across the country gathered outside the U.S. Capitol today to rally against the Senate's immigration bill. Their big worry: that it would grant amnesty to millions of undocumented immigrants and take jobs away from struggling citizens, especially struggling African-Americans, as NPR's Ailsa Chang reports.

AILSA CHANG, BYLINE: Patty Pitchford does not consider herself racist. She's a black woman from L.A. who says she has learned to accept outsiders.

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From Our Listeners
4:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Vacation Horror Stories: Accidental Thief

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In the 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote the "Canterbury Tales." It takes places on a pilgrimage to Canterbury Cathedral in England, much like a listener's story we're going to share with you now. It's part of a little summer series we call...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Vacation...

(SOUNDBITE OF SCREAM)

SIEGEL: ...Horror Stories.

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Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
4:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

After DOMA Ruling, Binational Gay Couples Face New Issues

Brian Mathers calls his husband, Isidro, in Mexico from his living room in Sioux City, Iowa. Brian and Isidro have been separated for more than a year by immigration laws that did not recognize their marriage.
Durrie Bouscaren NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:13 pm

Now that the Supreme Court struck down a key section of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, same-sex couples can apply for their foreign-born husbands, wives and fiancees to join them in the United States.

There are an estimated 28,000 gay and lesbian binational couples in the country, and for years many have been separated by immigration laws that didn't recognize their marriage.

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Music News
3:17 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Shout Bands Stir Up Tubular Fervor In Charlotte

Cedric Mangum (left) leads the shout band as a junior member looks on.
Daniel Coston for NPR

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 1:42 pm

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Author Interviews
3:04 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Christ In Context: 'Zealot' Explores The Life Of Jesus

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:13 pm

Writer and scholar Reza Aslan was 15 years old when he found Jesus. His secular Muslim family had fled to the U.S. from Iran, and Aslan's conversion was, in a sense, an adolescent's attempt to fit into American life and culture. "My parents were certainly surprised," Aslan tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

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Parallels
2:37 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Venice, Huge Cruise Ships Bring Tourists And Complaints

A massive cruise ships towers over Venice. Some 650 cruise ships now visit the Italian city annually, and critics say they threaten the city's fragile architecture.
Courtesty of the No Big Ships Committee

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:13 pm

The fragile architectural treasures of Venice are endangered by rising sea levels, and a growing number of critics now say the city and its canals are at risk from massive cruise ships as big as floating skyscrapers.

On an average day, tens of thousands of passengers lean over the railings of cruise ships that can be 300 yards long and 15 stories high. The tourists peer down at the majestic Doge's Palace as they sail into St. Mark's basin and down the Giudecca canal.

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WMUK News
2:33 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Schauer: Gov. Snyder's leadership a failure

Democratic candidate for governor Mark Schauer
Credit WMUK

Former congressman and state lawmaker Mark Schauer says he decided to launch his campaign for governor because Republican Rick Snyder has not been the moderate governor that Michigan voters had hoped for. Schauer was interviewed Monday for the WMUK program WestSouthwest. The Battle Creek Democrat says on a number of issues, including taxing pension income and “right to work”, Snyder has catered to the right wing of the Republican Party.

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Green Living
1:12 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Will your death be green? Environmentalists choose natural burial

Ronald Zartman beside the first natural burial at Ridgeview Memorial Gardens.
Credit Nancy Camden

There are three certified green burial sites in Michigan. Bobbi Parmer and her husband have chosen to be buried at Ridgeview Memorial Gardens, a non-profit site near Grand Rapids.

“My husband and I, we make very conscious choices about our food purchases, our clothing purchases,” Parmer says. “So with end of life planning, we took as much consideration for environmental, social aspects.” 

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Race
11:56 am
Mon July 15, 2013

What Does Race Have To Do With It?

Host Michel talks about the role race played — or didn't play — in the criminal trial of George Zimmerman. She speaks with Corey Dade, contributing editor for TheRoot.com, and Roger L. Simon, founder of PJ Media.

Around the Nation
11:56 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Robert Zimmerman: 'Respect Jury's Decision'

Host Michel Martin talks to Robert Zimmerman Jr. about the acquittal of his younger brother, George Zimmerman, in the killing of unarmed Florida teenager Trayvon Martin.

Around the Nation
11:56 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Explaining The Zimmerman Verdict To Your Kids

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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7:22 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Debate on common core education standards in Michigan

Lead in text: 
Legislative hearing on issue scheduled for Tuesday
Michigan's adoption of the Common Core State Standards, a set of learning goals embraced by 44 other states in the nation, should have been a slam dunk given the widespread support that exists in the state.

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