Parallels
3:00 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Bound By Blood, Divided By Politics: Three Egyptian Sisters

Egyptian women queue outside a polling station during voting on a disputed constitution drafted by Islamist supporters of then-President Mohammed Morsi, in Giza, Egypt, last December. In a country divided by a political crisis, families are not spared.
Nasser Nasser AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 8:44 pm

Nagwa, Dina and May are sisters. All three are married, all three have children. All three had always been close — until now.

Egypt's political crisis is changing those relationships. Nagwa and May sympathize with the Muslim Brotherhood. Dina, on the other hand, supports the military, arguing that the generals are just keeping extremists at bay.

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It's All Politics
2:58 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Booker Gets A Run For His Money In N.J. Senate Race

Democrat Cory Booker (left) and Republican Steve Lonegan stand together after their first debate in the race for U.S. Senate on Oct. 4 in Trenton, N.J.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 9:22 am

Cory Booker, the celebrity mayor of Newark, N.J., was expected to cruise to victory in the special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Frank Lautenberg. But just a week before voters go to the polls, he's facing a surprisingly strong challenge from Tea Party favorite Steve Lonegan.

The race was supposed to be a mismatch: Booker, the Democrat, and his 1.4 million Twitter followers versus the Republican former mayor of Bogota, N.J. — population 8,000.

But no one told Lonegan.

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The Two-Way
2:28 am
Wed October 9, 2013

Shutdown Forces Antarctic Research Into 'Caretaker Status'

The Chalet (right) is the U.S. Antarctic Program's administrations and operations center at McMurdo Station.
Reed Scherer National Science Foundation

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 4:44 am

Earlier this week we told you that scientists who do research in Antarctica have been on pins and needles, worried that the government shutdown would effectively cancel all of their planned field work this year.

Well, those scientists just got the news they didn't want to hear.

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9:39 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

National Guard mission suffers because of government shutdown

Lead in text: 
Nearly all of the $30-million budget for Air National Guard Base in Battle Creek comes from federal government
More than 100 civilian employees have returned to work, but the Battle Creek Air National Guard base is struggling to stay open because of the federal government shutdown. "It is far from fixed," Col. Ronald Wilson, base commander said Tuesday. "My biggest worry was to get people back.
8:56 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Ottawa County officials predict property tax rates will hold, revenue increase

Lead in text: 
It's first year since 2009 Ottawa County is in the black with operating tax revenue
Ottawa County seal Tax revenue will increase next year, according to Ottawa County predictions. The county's property tax levy will remain the same next year, but total property tax revenue could go up by 3 percent or more, officials said. Much of that can be attributed to a manufacturing resurgence.
NPR Story
7:24 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

White House: Obama To Tap Janet Yellen For Fed Chair

The White House announced Tuesday that President Obama will nominate Federal Reserve Vice Chairwoman Janet Yellen to chair the Federal Reserve Wednesday. She would replace Ben Bernanke, who's stepping down from the post. Yellen has been the presumptive nominee for weeks, after Lawrence Summers announced his intention to remove himself from the running in September. She'd be the first woman to head the Fed.

Parallels
6:35 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Asian Allies' Anxieties Rise Amid Washington Paralysis

President Obama listens as Chinese President Xi Jinping answers a question after a bilateral meeting in California on June 7.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:24 pm

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government has all sorts of costs — not only in the United States, but also overseas. President Obama had to cancel a trip this week to visit four nations in Asia so he could stay in Washington to deal with the political crisis. That has disappointed — even worried — some of America's friends in the region, who are counting on the United States to stand up to an increasingly assertive China.

The disappointment over the president's no-show in Asia was palpable.

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Environment
6:34 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Flood Forensics: Why Colorado's Floods Were So Destructive

Flooding brought down a house in Jamestown, Colo., on Sept. 18.
Matthew Staver Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 10:25 am

Parts of Colorado are still drying out after floods hit the state last month. Eight people died, and damage from the worst flooding in decades is in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

Scientists are now venturing into the hardest-hit areas to do a sort of "flood forensics" to understand why the floods were so bad.

Geologist Jonathan Godt takes Peak Highway in northern Colorado up into the Rockies. The road there winds past ravines and streams where water is still rushing.

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Religion
5:45 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Imam: 'We Can't Imagine' The Beauty Of Paradise After Death

A St. Louis-area imam spoke with NPR about what Muslims believe about life after death.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:26 am

This week, All Things Considered is talking with leaders from different faiths about their perspectives on the afterlife. NPR's Robert Siegel spoke with Mufti Asif Umar, a Muslim scholar and imam of the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis, about what Muslims believe and about his own beliefs.

Umar, the 29-year-old son of Indian immigrants, said Muslims believe that when a person dies, two angels appear and ask that person three questions about his or her faith. Those questions, Umar says, have correct answers.

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4:24 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Tanning bed ban for minors sparks debate

Lead in text: 
Some legislators believe the decision to let kids use tanning beds should be up to parents.
LANSING - Legislation that would prevent minors from using tanning beds and require tanning salons to register with the state has prompted a heated debate over how to address what some are calling a major public health threat without overly restricting parental rights. The bills, introduced by Rep.
Your Money
4:20 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Ups And Downs In Oil And Gas But Gas Remains A Cheaper Heat

Originally published on Thu October 24, 2013 2:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. For many parts of the country, winter has already struck and struck hard. Residents in those areas have started turning up their thermostats and according to federal predictions, they're likely to notice an increase in how much it costs to heat their homes. As Fred Bever from member station WBUR reports, after years of natural gas being the cheapest heating option out there, the price is starting to go up.

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All Tech Considered
4:20 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Health Exchange Tech Problems Point To A Thornier Issue

"We can do better," says White House spokesman Jay Carney, of healthcare.gov's ongoing software problems and delays.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:24 pm

One week after its rocky rollout, the federal site to help you sign up for health insurance exchanges went down again overnight for additional software fixes. The Obama administration says the technology powering the marketplaces buckled under unexpectedly high traffic. But the ongoing software hiccups for healthcare.gov point to a much thornier problem: procurement processes.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:20 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Verdi's Gift: Wringing Catchy Music From Touchy Subjects

In his operas, Giuseppe Verdi had a knack for empowering marginalized people — like the title character of Aida, who is an enslaved Ethiopian princess (played in this 2011 French production by American soprano Indra Thomas).
Gerard Julien AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:24 pm

Two hundred years ago this week, Giuseppe Verdi was born in an Italian town midway between Bologna and Milan. On the occasion of his bicentennial, All Things Considered wanted to know what makes the great opera composer so enduring — why his work is still so frequently discussed and performed these two centuries later. The answer, says conductor and arranger John Mauceri, is that Verdi had a knack for making thorny topics accessible.

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Author Interviews
4:08 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Elizabeth Smart Says Kidnapper Was A 'Master At Manipulation'

Elizabeth Smart has the kind of fame no one would want: In the summer of 2002, at the age of 14, she became one of the nation's most famous kidnap victims when she was abducted from her bedroom in Salt Lake City, where she lived with her devout Mormon family.

Her kidnapper, Brian David Mitchell, saw himself as a religious prophet and took her to be his second wife in a polygamous marriage. With a knife at her throat, Mitchell forced her to go with him to his remote camp on a mountain near Salt Lake, where they lived during the first stage of her nine-month captivity.

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12:45 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Challenge to city of Wyoming's ban on medical marijuana to be heard by state Supreme Court

Lead in text: 
Oral arguments set for Thursday
LANSING, MI - The city of Wyoming's three-year-old ban on medical marijuana will face its final test this week as attorneys argue before the State Supreme Court as to whether the city can reject the voter-approved Medical Marijuana Act on the grounds that the act violates federal law.

APA Competition Special

The American Pianists Association (APA) and the WFMT Radio Network are pleased to present this four-part radio series showcasing the competition finalists for the APA’s 2013 Classical Fellowship Awards. Billed as “Classical Discovery Week,” the finals took place from April 15-April 20 in Indianapolis, home of the APA.

Mental Health
12:09 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Mental Health Care: Why Some Get It And Some Don't

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up in money coach - look, you're a college student, you're hard-pressed for some cash and one of your classmates invites you to a, quote, amazing business opportunity. Is there a way to tell if it's the real deal and not just a scam? We'll take a closer look at some of these schemes or scams that seem to target college students in just a few minutes.

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Around the Nation
7:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

NFL Jaguars, Broncos Have Interesting Point Spread

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. If you bet on the Jacksonville Jaguars this weekend, your team could be crushed and you could still win. The Jaguars are 0-5. They play Peyton Manning's undefeated Denver Broncos. The Broncos are 28-point favorites, the biggest point spread in NFL history. The Jaguars could lose by 27, you'd still win your bet. But gamble with care. In their big win against Dallas last weekend, Denver did not cover the spread. It is MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:33 am
Tue October 8, 2013

No Bones About It, Shutdown Traps T. Rex In Storage Facility

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

It may have been a fearsome predator in its day, but even Tyrannosaurus rex could not escape the government shutdown. A T. rex skeleton, one of the most complete in existence, was headed to the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum this week to star in the National Fossil Day festivities. But with the museum closed, the tyrant lizard will continue to reign supreme at a storage facility in Montana, coming to Washington next spring

7:20 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Judge will decide whether Snyder must disclose other candidates for Detroit Emergency Manager

Lead in text: 
Snyder will be deposed Wednesday in unions' lawsuit over Detroit bankruptcy
Detroit - U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes will hold a hearing Tuesday on whether Gov. Rick Snyder and two top aides have to disclose the names of other individuals considered for Detroit's emergency manager job.
7:05 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Troubles continue at Calhoun County mobile home park

Lead in text: 
At least five trailers in Triangle Mobile Home Park have been condemned since November of last year
Misty Jensen was told she could rent-to-own her trailer in Triangle Mobile Home Park with a $1,000 down payment in November 2012 on lot 29M. After tearing up the carpet and linoleum flooring, Jensen said she found holes in the floor and asked for it to be replaced
6:41 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Republican launches primary challenge to Amash

Lead in text: 
Business owner Brian Ellis says Grand Rapids Republican has "turned his back on our conservative principles"
Washington U.S. Rep. Justin Amash, a young libertarian lawmaker, will face a Republican primary challenger in August who argues Amashs independent streak has put him out of touch with his West Michigan constituents. Brian Ellis, owner of an investment advisory firm and East Grand Rapids School Board member, announced Tuesday he will challenge Amash for the 3rd Congressional District seat.
6:09 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Kalamazoo City Manager Ken Collard's last day on job will be November 11th

Lead in text: 
Collard is taking advantage of early retirement for city workers
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Kalamazoo City Manager Kenneth Collard's last day in his position will be Nov. 11. That evening is set to be the first meeting for incoming city manager Jim Ritsema. It also will serve as the swearing-in for the new Kalamazoo City Commission after the Nov. 5 election.
Animals
4:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

The Truth About Lemmings, The Rodent, Not The Political Animal

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:48 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now we have this note as we continue America's most comprehensive coverage of the government shutdown. We have this morning, a scientific clarification about lemmings. Last week, you may recall a Republican lawmaker called his colleagues lemmings. He meant his fellow Republicans were following Senator Ted Cruz on a disastrous mission that led to the government shutdown.

Lemmings supposedly follow each other over a cliff. But we have learned - NPR has learned - that lemming mass suicide is a myth.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Sports
4:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

WNBA's All-Time Top Scorer Tina Thompson Retires

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:58 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We're going to hear next from a woman who has finished one of the most extraordinary careers in recent sports history. Tina Thompson, of pro basketball Seattle Storm, has retired. She played in every one of the WNBA's 17 seasons. The all-time top scorer, she won four championships, two Olympic gold medals. But she never dreamed of becoming a pro basketball player. That option once hardly existed for women.

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Law
4:37 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Jury Selection To Begin For Trial Of Madoff Employees

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Nearly five years after Bernie Madoff was arrested for fraud, some of his former employees are about to go on trial in New York. The trial is expected to focus on how much the employees knew about Madoff's multibillion dollar Ponzi scheme. Jury selections gets under way today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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Law
3:25 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Calif. Law Allows Undocumented Immigrants To Practice Law

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference in August. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the U.S. illegally.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 11:32 am

Sergio Garcia passed the California Bar exam four years ago. The bar granted Garcia a law license, but then rescinded it because he was undocumented.

The justices of the California Supreme Court may have been sympathetic to Garcia, but it quickly became clear during arguments they didn't think the law was on his side. Specifically, as the U.S. Department of Justice argued, federal law prevented Garcia's admission to the bar.

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It's All Politics
3:05 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Hastert: Primary Challenges Making Congress 'Kind Of Neurotic'

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert of Illinois is congratulated by members of Congress during the unveiling of his portrait at the Capitol in 2009.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 11:25 am

When it comes to political deal-making, former House Speaker Dennis Hastert speaks from experience.

"I always had a feeling whenever I had to negotiate ... you really needed to make sure that you knew where the hole in the box was, so if you got in there, you could get out of it again," says the Illinois Republican, who was speaker from 1999 until 2007.

Hastert tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that he can't say whether House Republicans now have themselves in a box in the government shutdown fight because "we don't know what the end of this thing is yet."

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Around the Nation
3:05 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Phase 2 Of BP Trial Focuses On Amount Of Spilled Oil

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen burning in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010. A second phase of the BP trial, which started this week, looks at just how much oil spilled into the Gulf.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 12:48 pm

In a New Orleans courtroom this week, BP and the federal government are arguing over how much oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon explosion in 2010.

Oil flowed from the out-of-control well for nearly three months. Just how much oil spilled will be key in determining the amount BP will have to pay in federal fines and penalties.

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Hobbies
9:40 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Temari thread balls: A lesser-known Japanese art

Temari balls made by Ethy Denardo
Credit Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

This month, Ethy Denardo is hosting a workshop on Temari, or decorated Japanese thread balls, at Comstock Public Library.

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