Music
12:15 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Pitbull On Music From His Latino Side

Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 5:51 pm

Cuban-American rapper Pitbull shares some of his favorite songs for Tell Me More's regular 'In Your Ear' segment.

One of his favorite songs is Nuestro Dia (Ya Viene Llegando) by Willy Chirino. "It's all about the story, the struggle and the hustle that a lot of Cubans go through to enjoy the freedom, liberties and opportunities that the United States has to offer," says Pitbull. He's proud of Chirino, and says the song keeps him grounded.


Pitbull's Playlist

September by Earth, Wind & Fire

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Asia
11:06 am
Wed September 18, 2013

China's Debate: Must The Party Follow The Constitution?

A police officer blocks photos from being taken outside Zhongnanhai, the central headquarters for the Communist Party of China, in Beijing last year.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

Several weeks back, officials with the East China University of Political Science and Law met one of its professors, Zhang Xuezhong, at his favorite hangout, a coffeehouse in Shanghai.

Sitting in a private room, they told him he was suspended from teaching for articles he had posted on the Internet. In them, Zhang had argued that China's government needs to build a real rule of law — one to which even the party is accountable — as well as a system of checks and balances.

One way to start, he says, is to live up to the promises made in China's 1982 constitution.

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Around the Nation
9:47 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Is Nina Davuluri 'American Enough' To Be Miss America?

Nina Davuluri says Miss America — whom she's always seen as the girl next door — is evolving.
Brian McCabe NPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 5:51 pm

Miss New York, Nina Davuluri, took the crown in this year's Miss America beauty pageant. It was the 87th year of the competition, and Davuluri was one of two Asian-Americans in the final round. Although she's just a few days into her reign, Davuluri has already made history. She's the first Indian-American Miss America.

Her win highlights how far the U.S. has come, but also how far the country has to go: Racist tweets flooded in on Twitter right after her victory.

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WestSouthwest
8:17 am
Wed September 18, 2013

WestSouthwest: Kalamazoo School Superintendent Michael Rice

Kalamazoo School Superintendent Michael Rice
Credit Kalamazoo Public Schools

This week on WestSouthwest we speak with Kalamazoo Public School Superintendent Michael Rice. Joining us is Kalamazoo Gazette education reporter Julie Mack.

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6:59 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Congressman Justin Amash won't run for U.S. Senate

Lead in text: 
Decision leaves former Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land as only prominent Republican in Senate race
Rep. Justin Amash, the Michigan Republican who has established himself as the leading libertarian in the House of Representatives, will not run for U.S. Senate in 2014, according to several sources familiar with the congressman's decision.
World
6:46 am
Wed September 18, 2013

New Zealand Men Give New Meaning To The Words: Beer Tap

With the sponsorship of a brewery, the men rigged a friend's home so that beer flowed from all the taps.

World
6:43 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Why Lilly Collins Is The 'Most Dangerous Celebrity'

Fantasy film star Lily Collins seems harmless but beware of looking for more about the starlet on the Internet. According to antivirus software company McAfee, she is the Most Dangerous Celebrity. Plugging Collins' name into a search engine has a 14 percent chance of turning up a computer virus.

Education
4:49 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Should It Take 2 Or 3 Years To Earn A Law Degree?

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Law students are looking for some changes to their education. The American Bar Association plans to issue a report in the next few weeks, recommending a major overhaul of how law schools operate. And students are hoping that a recent comment from President Obama, will boost one reform in particular: cutting law schools down to two years, from three.

NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

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Race
4:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

University Of Alabama Moves To Integrate Greek System

Judy Bonner, the University of Alabama's new president, when the school's championship football team visited the White House on April 19, 2012.
Mike Theiler UPI /Landov

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:48 pm

Students at the University of Alabama and community leaders are reacting to allegations that white sororities denied access to black women because of their race.

The student newspaper in Tuscaloosa, the Crimson White, ran a story that quotes sorority members who say they wanted to recruit at least two black candidates but the students' names were removed before members could vote on them.

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Latin America
4:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Brazil's President Postpones U.S. Visit Over Spying Concerns

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A secret surveillance court has issued a very rare public defense of the U.S. program that collects massive data on phone calls. The court wrote that this program which stores numbers and call times but not content, we're told, does not violate privacy rights.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The American Civil Liberties Union countered that it is folly to trust privacy decisions to a secret court.

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Business
4:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Home Care Workers To Be Included In Wage And Overtime Law

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Almost 2 million Americans are employed as home care workers. Wow. Many of them are not covered by minimum wage and overtime laws, but that is about to change. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: The new rules, announced by the White House, cover in-home aides who assist the elderly or the disabled with things like dressing, feeding and taking medications.

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NPR Story
4:20 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Gun Control Advocates Say Little After Navy Yard Shooting

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 5:19 am

In the aftermath of this week's shooting rampage at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., there has been no revival of the debate over gun control. In fact, the response from both sides in the debate has been muted. That's very different from what happened after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings in December.

NPR Story
4:20 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Colorado Officials Scale Back Searches For Flood Victims

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 4:53 am

The search and rescue effort in Colorado is slowing down. While many are still listed as missing, officials are scaling back on the effort to find those trapped in areas severely affected by recent flooding. They say most people who wanted to get out have been able to do so.

NPR Story
4:20 am
Wed September 18, 2013

U.S. Team Must Rally To Win America's Cup

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK, the America's Cup is in its final days and it doesn't look good for the home team. Team USA has been looking better lately but still trails, seven-to-one. Even if the Americans stage a comeback, the regatta will likely be remembered for failing to live up to its hype.

NPR's Richard Gonzales reports.

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Sweetness And Light
3:19 am
Wed September 18, 2013

More Than Average: Dow Jones Adds The 'Swoosh'

Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 4:01 pm

After 117 years, sports has finally made it to the big time, when, starting next Tuesday, a sports company will be included in the Dow Jones averages.

The Dow Jones, of course, has always preferred very serious corporations –– your banks, your automotives, your insurers. OK, the movies were allowed in 1932 with the inclusion of Loews, and Walt Disney was brought onboard in 1991, but sports was never considered substantial enough for an industrial average until now, when Nike has been ordained.

Yes, Dow Jones has the swoosh.

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National Security
3:19 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Officials: Edward Snowden's Leaks Were Masked By Job Duties

Government officials tell NPR that Edward Snowden's job responsibilities allowed him to copy sensitive files unnoticed.
Maxim Shemetov Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 10:58 am

More than three months after Edward Snowden revealed details of NSA secret surveillance activities, intelligence officials are still assessing the fallout from the former contractor's disclosures. But they already know how the leaks happened.

"We have an extremely good idea of exactly what data he got access to and how exactly he got access to it," says the NSA's chief technology officer, Lonny Anderson.

In interviews with NPR, two government officials shared that part of the Snowden story in one of the most detailed discussions of the episode to date.

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Shots - Health News
3:18 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Florida Makes Spreading Word On Health Care Law A Challenge

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has questioned efforts to use federally funded navigators to help people enroll for insurance through the Affordable Care Act.
John Raoux AP

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 1:01 pm

At a community center named for Florida civil rights pioneer Carrie Meek, a few dozen members of Miami's National Church of God gathered over the weekend for a tea party — and to hear from a special guest, Monica Rodriguez of Enroll America.

The organization is working to spread the word about the Affordable Care Act, the federal law that will let people without health insurance shop for coverage starting Oct. 1.

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11:01 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Battle Creek Commission approves new rules for donation bins, pawn shops

Lead in text: 
Bin owners will have to pay a permit fee. City will use electronic system to track stolen good sold at pawn shops
Battle Creek city commissioners adopted ordinances on Tuesday meant to improve tracking of stolen goods at pawn shops and to regulate donation bins around the city. They also brought the Heritage Tower project closer to reality by passing a brownfield plan to pave the way for redevelopment funding.
10:36 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Dowagiac man to challenge Upton in Republican primary

Lead in text: 
Jim Bussler has never run for elected office, but volunteered for Jack Hoogendyk's campaign against Upton in 2012
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
DOWAGIAC, MI - A registered nurse from Dowagiac thinks he has the prescription to clean up politics. Jim Bussler, 45, announced Tuesday that he will challenge U.S. Rep. Fred Upton, R-St. Joseph, in the Republican primary next year. Bussler, a Dowagiac native who works at Lakeland HealthCare, officially announced his candidacy Tuesday.
8:17 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Kalamazoo County board approves brownfield site in Schoolcraft

Lead in text: 
Public input will be sought on what should go at the site
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - The Kalamazoo County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to approve the creation of a brownfield site at a former gas station in the Village of Schoolcraft. The property, located at 306 N. Grand St., is currently owned by the Kalamazoo County Land Bank.
WMU - Cooley
8:11 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

WMU formally links agreement with Cooley Law School

File photo
Credit WMUK

Agreement paves the way for Cooley to become the Western Michigan University Thomas M. Cooley Law School. 

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All Tech Considered
5:34 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Calculated To Win: Supercomputers Power America's Cup

Oracle Team USA heads to the waterfront after winning the ninth race of the America's Cup with a 47-second victory over Emirates Team New Zealand.
Eric Risberg AP

The 2013 America's Cup isn't just about using human muscle to race faster than the wind. This year, the international sailing competition is about supercomputing.

Tech teams are working behind the scenes to crunch numbers and model things like how a half-degree change in wing angle could add 5 knots in speed.

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U.S.
5:34 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

The Occupy Movement At 2: Many Voices, Many Messages

Demonstrators congregate near the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday. Numerous rallies and events were planned to mark the second anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement, which targets income inequality and financial greed.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:31 pm

By 10 a.m. Tuesday, several hundred people had already gathered in Manhattan's Zuccotti Park to mark the second anniversary of the movement known as Occupy Wall Street.

With many people coming and going, heading for actions like a McDonald's protest or a march on Washington Square Park, it was difficult to assess actual numbers. Much like Occupy itself, groups changed and reformed all morning.

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Economy
5:34 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Census Report Paints Troubling Economic Picture On Incomes

Raisa Ruiz (right) and her niece Mary Badels wait in line at the Manna Food Center, Gaithersburg, Md., on Sept. 13.
Chloe Coleman NPR

For the first year since the recession, median household incomes did not decline in 2012. But it's hardly a reassuring picture. Incomes were flat despite the economic recovery and big gains in the stock market. That's a troubling aspect about today's labor market. It's four years since the official end of the recession and many households are worse off than when it started.

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Parallels
4:37 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

As Economy Cools, Brazilians Find Themselves Trapped In Debt

A woman looks at clothes inside a shop in Rio de Janeiro. Consumption has been a huge driver of the Brazilian economy, but the boom years are over, and economists say the outlook isn't good.
Sergio Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 8:44 pm

It all started out so promisingly. She was young, still in her teens, and she'd landed her first job. As is the custom in Brazil, to get your salary you have to open an account with the bank the company deals with — and with that new account came the woman's first credit card.

"The banks say, 'I want to help you,' " she says. "And if you have a credit card, it's a status symbol, you are well-regarded."

She switched jobs. That company dealt with another bank — which issued her another credit card. She got a store credit card, too.

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Music Reviews
4:33 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Tom Odell: A Polarizing New Voice Shows Promise

Long Way Home is British singer Tom Odell's debut.
Andrew Whitton Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 5:34 pm

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3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Kellogg makes Working Mothers best companies list

Lead in text: 
Companies that made the list offer things like insurance for part-time workers, paid maternity leave, telecommuting, and lactation rooms.
BATTLE CREEK, MI -- The residents of Battle Creek have known for many years that a job at Kellogg Co. was usually a good thing to have. Working Mother magazine added to that reputation this week by including the maker of Frosted Flakes, Pringles and Mini-Wheats on its 2013 list of the 100 Best Companies for Working Mothers.
3:04 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Detroit bankruptcy will not be a trend says U.S. Conference of Mayors

Lead in text: 
President and Mesa, Arizona mayor Scott Smith says the problems that are facing Detroit—like rapid population decline, pension debt, and a decreasing tax base—aren't the same as other cities.
The president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors said today he doesn't expect Detroit's financial crisis to lead to a spate of other municipal bankruptcy filings, characterizing the city's problems as 'an outlier' compared to others. Scott Smith, the mayor of Mesa, Ariz., spoke to the Free Press on a trip to Washington.
WMUK News
2:49 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Finding ways to fight food insecurity

Volunteer at a community garden in Flint
Credit Michigan Municipal League / Flickr

Nearly two of every three people in Michigan suffer from “food insecurity”. A University of Michigan researcher says there are several reasons for that. Dorceta Taylor is a professor at the School of Natural Resources and Environment. She’s among those involved in a federal study of food insecurity around the state.

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2:44 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Drivers under the influence to pay flat fees for Kalamazoo emergency response

Lead in text: 
The new flat rates created by the Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety will be based on whether the driver got into an accident and if blood was drawn in the emergency room.
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The Kalamazoo City Commission on Monday adjusted emergency response fees that District Court applies to people convicted operating under the influence in the city Since 2001, the city has charged OWI defendants at a per-minute rate depending on an officer's rank, based on the amount of time the officer spent responding, investigating, arresting, processing, analyzing evidence and writing reports on individual cases.

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