Food and Drink
11:08 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Learn how hard cider is made at Virtue Cider in Fennville

Gregg Hall at Virtue Cider in Fennville
Credit Nancy Camden

Michigan is one of the top three growers of apples in the country making it a great place to produce what in this country we call ‘hard’ cider. In England, France or Spain, it’s simply called cider while unfermented pressed apple is called ‘juice.’

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Africa
10:38 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Nelson Mandela Said To Be Gravely Ill

South Africa is on watch for the fate of the 94-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate. The ailing Mandela, an international icon known for his fight to end apartheid, has been in the hospital for several days. For the latest on his condition, Renee Montagne speaks with NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

Film
10:26 am
Thu June 27, 2013

'The Heat': Improv comedy with a Boston flair

You’d expect to see Melissa McCarthy in a raucous comedy like The Heat, which opens Friday. Even Sandra Bullock’s name above the title is no great surprise. But who would expect the cast to include Joey McIntyre, best known as the youngest of the new Kids on the Block?

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7:35 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Police raid medical marijuana dispensaries in Springfield

Lead in text: 
Businesses were targeted for operating "outside the scope" of Michigan's medical marijuana law
SPRINGFIELD - Police with search warrants raided three medical marijuana dispensaries in Springfield Wednesday, alleging they were violating Michigan law. About 10:45 a.m. Michigan State Police troopers and undercover drug officers drove into the parking lot of The Karmacy at 4549 W. Dickman Road.
7:31 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commission to pick firm Thursday night for city manager search

Lead in text: 
Commissioners fired original search firm last month and re-launched search for new city manager
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The Kalamazoo City Commission will select a firm to lead its revamped city manager search at a special meeting tonight. Commissioners on Monday spent four hours Monday conducting in-person interviews with representatives from four firms: Deerfield, Ill.-based Voorhees Associates LLC, Kalamazoo-based Welsh & Associates, Keller, Texas-based Strategic Government Resources and Wellington, Fla.-based Colin Baenziger & Associates.
7:26 am
Thu June 27, 2013

South Haven schools budget includes pay freeze

Lead in text: 
Various unions have to agree to no raises
SOUTH HAVEN - South Haven schools' new budget calls for a pay freeze for all district employees.
6:55 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Holland City Council approves fireworks ordinances

Lead in text: 
Limits the hours fireworks can be set off
KEY ACTION The Holland City Council finalized its fireworks ordinance one week shy of Independence Day. DISCUSSION In April, the city council approved a fireworks ordinance that limited the use and ignition of them to the 10 federal holidays listed under state law and the day before and after each - meaning fireworks would only be allowed 30 days out of the year.
6:26 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Michigan Senate Republicans form work group on Medicaid

Lead in text: 
Senate adjourned last week without vote on Medicaid expansion in state
State Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville, R-Monroe, has formed a work group to study possbible Medicaid expansion in Michigan - an issue that he said is not dead, despite a decision last week by senators to leave for summer break without taking a vote on it.
6:10 am
Thu June 27, 2013

KIA Executive Director Jim Bridenstine to retire

Lead in text: 
Bridenstine plans to stay on until his replacement is found
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- After 23 years at the helm at one of Kalamazoo's most significant organizations, Jim Bridenstine, the executive director of the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, is retiring. Bridenstine announced the move Wednesday in a press release. "It has been an incredibly satisfying experience to serve the past 23 years as the Executive Director of the KIA.
Around the Nation
5:46 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Expecting Parents Ask For Help Naming Their Son

A Connecticut couple couldn't decide whether to name their soon-to-be-born son Jackson or Logan. So according to the New Haven Register, they decided to take a poll of customers at Starbucks. In the end, they went with their own suggestion: Logan Jackson.

World
5:41 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Racing Pigeon Has Poor Sense Of Direction

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A pigeon that set out on what was to be a 600-mile race in Japan lost his way, and ended up landing 5,000 miles across the Pacific in Canada. When it was found on Vancouver Island, the bird was exhausted and very skinny. Now he's been adopted by a pigeon racing club there. They're considering breeding the bird, figuring his offspring will be just as resilient, though hopefully the young ones will get their sense of direction from the mother.

Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
5:01 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Gay Military Spouses To Benefit From Supreme Court Ruling

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. The Supreme Court ruling yesterday on the Defense of Marriage Act will change the lives of many people, including some in the U.S. military. Gay spouses of service members have long been denied the substantial benefits available to heterosexual couples. Yesterday's ruling that struck down DOMA means gay married couples can look forward to more equal treatment from the Pentagon, as NPR's Larry Abramson reports.

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Law
4:36 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Reaction To Gay-Marriage Rulings Run The Gamut

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 10:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Business
4:04 am
Thu June 27, 2013

$99 Game Console Ouya Aims To Take Down Barriers To Fans

The Ouya game console and controller. Games are sold through something like an app store, allowing customers to sample them before buying.
Courtesy of Ouya

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:37 pm

Sony and Microsoft are preparing to launch their latest gaming consoles this fall with price tags from $400 for the PlayStation 4 and $500 for the Xbox One. But this week, a $99 game console went on sale and sold out at Target and Amazon.

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Business
3:00 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Walgreens Cashes In On Department Stores' Pain

Customers check out at the new flagship Walgreens in Washington, D.C.'s Chinatown.
Brenda Salinas NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 1:21 pm

At the turn of the 20th century, drugstores were little more than a pharmacist and a soda fountain. If you wanted to go shopping, you went to a department store.

Now, that trend is reversing. Department stores are suffering and drugstores are booming.

So much so that Walgreens — one of the industry's leaders — is experimenting with expanding its goods and services.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:55 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Six Words: 'Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt'

Caryn Lantz and her husband Chuck were surprised to learn that costs associated with adopting black children were much lower than for white or mixed race children. They ultimately went with an adoption in which the fee was based on their income, not skin color.
Courtesy of Caryn Lantz

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 9:46 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition. You can find hundreds of six-word submissions and submit your own at www.theracecardproject.com.

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Fine Art
2:54 am
Thu June 27, 2013

A Paris Vacation For Nashville Millionaires' French Art

A table (Le Dejeuner), an 1892 oil painting by Edouard Vuillard, appears to show a quiet domestic scene. But Isabelle Cahn, the curator of a new show at the Musee d'Orsay, says this painting actually depicts a scandal-ridden household.
Courtesy Musee d'Orsay

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:05 pm

To say that Nashvillean Spencer Hays is crazy for French art is an understatement. "French art just quickens our step, fires our spirit and touches our heart," he says.

Hays' passion began when he was in his 30s. By then he was already a millionaire; Forbes estimated his worth at $400 million in 1997, money earned from book-selling and clothing businesses. Hays had humble beginnings.

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Parallels
8:00 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Amid Construction Boom, Migrants Flow Into Brazil

Construction is underway on the Itaquerao stadium in Sao Paulo, shown here June 12. The stadium will be the venue for the opening ceremony and game of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, and many migrants are among the laborers working on the project.
Sebastiao Moreira EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

Brazil is in the midst of a building boom as it constructs stadiums across the country in preparation for the World Cup it will host next year. In Sao Paulo, hundreds of workers are building a massive arena that will take many more months to complete.

But not all of the workers are Brazilian.

Marie Eveline Melous, 26, arrived from Haiti just a few months ago because life was so difficult, especially after the huge earthquake in 2010. "It's hard to find work. I came to Brazil to help my situation," she says.

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Monkey See
8:00 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Telemundo's 'La Voz' Hands Latino Kids The Mic

Paola Guanche debuted with Adele's "Turning Tables."
Courtesy Telemundo

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

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Can I Just Tell You?
5:35 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

It's Time To Move On From The Past

Celebrity chef Paula Deen appears on NBC News' Today show on Wednesday.
NBC, Peter Kramer AP

I've been thinking a lot about forgiveness – a subject that's been coming up quite a bit lately because, really, how could it not?

As I was putting my thoughts together, Paula Deen, one of the queens of high-calorie Southern cookery, was still on her apology tour, trying to explain a few things, like her use of the N-word and the desire to dress up an army of black male waiters so that her brother could have the fun experience of being served by them at a, quote, "true Southern plantation-style wedding."

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5:14 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Future of the 2012 Gobles fire site

Lead in text: 
Among other improvements, Hometown Properties has purchased part of the site to build a Home Town Pharmacy. By declaring the area a brownfield district, Hometown Properties could get more than one hundred thousand dollars’ worth of redevelopment funds.
PAW PAW, MI -- The Van Buren County Board of Commissioners Tuesday formally established a brownfield redevelopment district at the site of Gobles' 2012 fire downtown. That fire on April 6 of last year wiped out Jan's Trailside Cafe, Jan's Oasis and C.C.C. Bait and Tackle.
5:12 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

What the DOMA repeal means for Michigan same-sex couples

Lead in text: 
The Defense of Marriage Act was struck down by the Supreme Court today, but the Michigan same sex marriage ban is still intact.
Washington - The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Wednesday to allow the federal government to extend benefits to gay couples that were reserved for people in traditional marriages may spark a fight for recognition of gay marriage in Michigan.
Humans
5:12 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Pitch-Perfect: Why Our Shoulders Are Key To Throwing

Harry Kaplan practices pitching during Home Run Baseball Camp at Friendship Recreation Center in June. Kaplan's arm is stretched long and toward the ground as his hips are faced away from the catcher. A chimp, in contrast, could never throw a fastball.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:01 pm

The ability to throw a baseball or any object with speed and precision is unique to us humans. And that ability depends on certain features of our anatomy that arose in our ancestors over 2 million years ago, according to a study published in this week's issue of the journal Nature.

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Science
5:10 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

New Bugs In Florida Stymie Researchers, Threaten Crops

The psyllid, discovered eight years ago in Florida citrus groves, has been problematic for researchers and farmers alike.
University of California, Davis AP

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

With its pleasant climate, Florida has become home to more exotic and invasive species of plants and animals than any other state in the continental U.S. Some invasive species have been brought in deliberately, such as the Burmese python or the Cuban brown snail. But the majority of species are imported inadvertently as cargo.

Amanda Hodges, who heads the biosecurity research lab at the University of Florida, says that until recently, scientists saw about a dozen new bugs arrive in Florida each year.

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Music Interviews
4:50 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Gospel Legend Mavis Staples Comes 'Full Circle'

Mavis Staples has been performing for more than six decades. One True Vine is her second album-length collaboration with Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy.
Zoran Orlic Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 7:14 pm

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Music Reviews
4:50 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

'My Ellington': A Pianist Gives Duke Her Personal Touch

Duke Ellington (1899-1974) at the piano at the Fairfield Hall, Croydon, during a British tour on Feb. 10, 1963.
John Pratt Getty Images

At the keys, Duke Ellington abstracted from stride piano, which modernized ragtime. Ellington's own spare percussive style then refracted through Thelonious Monk and Cecil Taylor, as well as a generation of freewheeling pianists active in Europe, like Aki Takase. Her new solo piano album is My Ellington, on which she plays some stride bass herself, as in "In a Mellow Tone."

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Health
4:50 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

'The Lyme Wars' That Tiny Ticks Have Wrought

In the current New Yorker, Michael Specter explores the conflict among some people who suffer from Lyme disease, and the doctors who study it.
aanton iStockphoto.com

Until 1977, Lyme disease was almost unknown. But in the decades since a Yale rheumatologist first described an unusual cluster of arthritis cases in Lyme, Conn., the disease has become the most commonly reported tick-borne illness in the country. Acute symptoms of Lyme disease commonly include a bull's-eye rash followed by flu-like symptoms.

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Books
4:23 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

In 'Sisterland' Familial Fissures And A Pair Of Psychic Twins

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

Curtis Sittenfeld is the Ed Norton of the literary world. Popular but intellectual, accessible but mysterious and, above all — a perspective chameleon with an uncanny ability to enter the minds of callow prep school outcasts and devotedly compromising first ladies alike. With Sisterland, she takes this mind-entering business to a literal level. The story of a pair of adult psychic twin sisters in St. Louis, it would have been an obvious choice for Sittenfeld to tell her story in the form of dueling narration.

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All Tech Considered
4:23 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Translation, Please: Hand-Held Device Bridges Language Gap

ELSA, or Enabling Language Service Anywhere, gives users quick access to interpreters who can translate between English and 180 other languages.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

Communicating between languages is an age-old challenge. Today computer programs can translate words instantly. But what about conversations? Intense ones? Maybe even the kind where life or death hangs in the balance?

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3:29 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

East Campus knocked off nomination for historic list

Lead in text: 
The National Trust for Historic Preservation put together their list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Places last week. Western Michigan University’s East Campus was going to be on it until officials found out that East Campus was scheduled for demolition.
KALAMAZOO, MI - The Houston Astrodome, one-room schoolhouses in Montana and a lighthouse on the island of Martha's Vineyard all made this year's list of America's 11 Most Endangered Places. Western Michigan University's historic East Campus did not.

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