Race
12:04 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Are White Women Harder Hit By Poverty?

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Faith Matters
12:04 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Tweeting For Atonement: Sharing Sins On Social Media

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Interviews
11:46 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Mindy Kaling Loves Rom Coms (And Being The Boss)

Danny (Chris Messina) and Mindy learn that medicine isn't all fun and games.
Beth Dubber Fox

This interview was originally broadcast on Sept. 25, 2012.

Mindy Kaling says she loves romantic comedies, even though she wrote last year in The New Yorker that saying so "is essentially an admission of mild stupidity."

Read more
Interviews
11:46 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'Totally Biased' Comic On Race, Politics And Audience

W. Kamau Bell's FXX series Totally Biased mixes standup, sketches and interviews.
Matthias Clamer

This interview was originally broadcast on Sept. 13, 2012.

Read more
NPR Story
11:09 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Is The NFL Weakening Defense Of Redskins' Name?

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for Backtalk, that's where we hear from you. Editor Ammad Omar is back with us once again. What's going on today, Ammad?

Read more
NPR Story
11:09 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Oklahoma State Slammed By Sports Illustrated

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael, with us from Cleveland. Here in our Washington, D.C. studios, sports writer and journalism professor Kevin Blackistone, Corey Dade, contributing editor for The Root, and NPR editor Ammad Omar decided to stick around. What do you know?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Hey, why not?

Read more
Around the Nation
7:13 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Retailer Blames Unlucky 13 For Lower Earnings

Men's Wearhouse stocks are down 10 percent, CEO Doug Ewert thinks he knows the reason why. The fear of the number 13. He blames superstitious brides for postponing their weddings to avoid 2013.

World
7:07 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Serious But Funny Discoveries Win Prizes

The lg Nobel Prize honors discoveries that are very scientific yet humorous. Winners include researchers who showed dung beetles navigate using the Milky Way. Other scientists proved that people who are drunk think they're more attractive.

7:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

State bar request disclosure of "issue spending" in judicial races

Lead in text: 
State bar is seeking to overturn 2004 ruling by then Secretary of State Terry Lynn Land
Lansing - The State Bar of Michigan is requesting that Secretary of State Ruth Johnson issue a declaratory ruling that donors funding all "issue" spending on judicial races must be publicly disclosed. State Bar President Bruce Courtade said Thursday that under Michigan's campaign finance act, Johnson has 60 days to respond to the request.
6:48 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Kalamazoo County Administrator gets mixed review from commission

Lead in text: 
Four commissioners want to renew Administrator Peter Battani's contract for 12 to 18 months. Battani says he wants a "standard three-year contract"
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Despite an increase from last year's evaluation, Kalamazoo County Administrator Peter Battani said he is "disappointed" with this year's review from the Kalamazoo County Board of Commissioners.
6:33 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Michigan looks to cut down on paperwork for businesses

Lead in text: 
Program also aims to improve customer response time
LANSING - State officials today pledged to cut in half the number of government forms Michigan businesses must fill out and touted changes they have already made to make the state more business-friendly. The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs announced its Reinventing Performance in Michigan program in partnership with three other state agencies.
Business
4:58 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Twitter Files For Initial Public Offering

Twitter announced via Tweet Thursday that it's launching its long awaited initial public offering. It will be the most high profile IPO since Facebook went public last year. But Twitter hopes to avoid the mishaps that's marred Facebook's stock market debut.

Business
4:39 am
Fri September 13, 2013

D.C. Mayor Vetoes Wage Bill Targeting Large Retailers

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:38 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

California is seeing its first increase in the state's minimum wage in six years - a 25 percent increase this time around. Yesterday, the state legislature voted to raise the minimum wage to $10 an hour by 2016. Governor Jerry Brown is expected to sign that bill into law.

Read more
Remembrances
4:39 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Sound Pioneer Ray Dolby Dies At 80

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 8:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Ray Dolby, whose inventions revolutionized the way audiences listen to entertainment, has died. He was 80 years old.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports the sound pioneer - whose name became synonymous with sound - died at home in San Francisco.

MANDALIT DEL BARCO, BYLINE: Thank Ray Dolby for inventing the system that surrounds you with sound at the movie theater and in your headphones.

(SOUNDBITE OF VARIOUS DOLBY SOUNDS)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Whispering) Surround you.

Read more
Politics
4:39 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Without Action, Government Will Shut Down At Month's End

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the future shape of the economy will be influenced, in part, by negotiations in Congress this month. What could possibly go wrong? If Congress doesn't act by the end of this month, there will be a partial government shutdown and then in October a fight over the debt ceiling looms. Some Republicans want to rerun a tactic they used in 2011, refusing to borrow to pay for commitments Congress previously made unless the White House agrees to Republican budget demands. NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith has the latest.

Read more
Science
3:07 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Living Gears Help This Bug Jump

An image from an electron microscope of the back legs of a planthopper insect.
Gregory Sutton

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 1:21 pm

Greg Sutton was closely inspecting the back legs of a planthopper nymph — a small green, flightless insect — when he noticed something odd.

Read more
Environment
3:06 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways

Gwynns Falls runs beneath Interstate 95 at Carroll Park in Baltimore. The chemistry of this river, like many across the country, is changing.
Courtesy of Sujay Kaushal

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 10:47 am

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline. Alkaline is the opposite of acidic — think baking soda or Rolaids.

Research published in the current issue of Environmental Science and Technology shows this trend to be surprisingly widespread, with possibly harmful consequences.

What's especially odd about the finding is its cause: It seems that acid rain actually has been causing waterways to grow more alkaline.

Read more
The Salt
3:05 am
Fri September 13, 2013

The Secret To Making It Through A Yom Kippur Fast? Kreplach

Kreplach, a special Jewish holiday dish that can be made essentially out of leftovers.
Courtesy of Caren Alpert

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 12:11 pm

To mark the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the day of atonement, Jews fast from sundown to sundown. But before the sun sets, friends and family gather to enjoy one final meal. And for the Jews of Eastern Europe, that meal traditionally includes kreplach.

Read more
The Record
12:23 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'90s Nostalgia Revisited: 6 Musicians We Miss

P.M. Dawn, sometime in the '90s.
Mick Hutson Redferns

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 8:11 am

Read more
Astronomy/Space
10:37 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

New Mars mission to study loss of water, atmosphere

A model of the craft for the MAVEN mission to Mars.
Credit NASA

A new spacecraft will be on its way to Mars in November to help us understand the planet’s atmosphere. 

Read more
Sports
10:28 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Derby Darlins take 3rd in tournament, host breast cancer fundraiser

Credit John Wijsman

A few weeks ago, the Killamazoo Derby Darlins hosted a tournament through the WFTDA—the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association. The Darlins invited nine teams from across the country to compete and they ended up placing 3rd in their first national competition.

Read more
9:05 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Springfield hires new city manager

Lead in text: 
Nathan Henne has been town manager for a year in Lake City, Colorado
Nathan Henne said he expects to sign a contract Monday to become the next Springfield city manager. Henne, 28, was selected by the council Thursday after interviews with the four candidates seeking to fill the position vacated by Frank Peterson, who leaves after five years to become manager of Muskegon.
Shots - Health News
5:48 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Florida Officials Swat At Mosquitoes With Dengue Fever

In 2010, Florida health officials looked for mosquito larvae in vehicle tires where water had collected. As many as 15 cases have been found in Stuart this year.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 6:29 pm

Public health officials in Florida are once again scrambling to contain an outbreak of dengue fever, a disease spread by mosquitoes.

Until 2009, when it surfaced in Key West, the tropical disease hadn't been seen in Florida in more than 70 years.

Now there are concerns dengue may establish a foothold in the state.

Read more
The Salt
5:48 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

No Bitter Pill: Doctors Prescribe Fruits And Veggies

Johanna Terron, 14, has lost over 20 pounds over the past year. She receives a prescription for fruits and vegetables from her pediatrician at Lincoln Hospital.
Allison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:21 pm

It was the Greeks who first counseled to let food be thy medicine. And, it seems, some doctors are taking this age-old advice to heart.

In New York City physicians are writing prescriptions for fresh fruits and vegetables. That's right, 'scripts for produce.

If you listen to my story on All Things Considered, you'll hear that the program is the creation of Wholesome Wave, a nonprofit that connects low-income people with local produce.

Read more
Space
5:44 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

See Ya, Voyager: Probe Has Finally Entered Interstellar Space

This artist's illustration shows the Voyager 1 space probe. The spacecraft was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, and as of August 2012, it is outside the bubble of hot gas, known as the "heliopause," that radiates from the sun.
NASA/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 9:34 pm

NASA's two Voyager spacecraft, launched in 1977, have made history in a dramatic fashion by exploring the outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Now one of the vehicles, Voyager I, has made another pioneering leap. It is the first spacecraft to leave the vast bubble of hot gas that surrounds our solar system.

At long last, Voyager 1 is now in interstellar space.

Read more
NPR's Backseat Book Club
5:01 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

How One Unkind Moment Gave Way To 'Wonder'

Random House

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 6:16 pm

In Wonder, R.J. Palacio tells the story of Auggie, a tough, sweet, 10-year-old boy, who was born with distorted facial features — a "craniofacial difference" caused by an anomaly in his DNA.

Palacio tells NPR's Michele Norris that the book was inspired by a real-life encounter with her own kids six years ago. They were at an ice cream store and sat next to a little girl with a severe facial deformity. Palacio's 3-year-old son cried in fear, so the author grabbed her kids and fled. She was trying to protect the girl but also avoid her own discomfort.

Read more
The Record
5:01 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Taking Back 'Funkytown': Songwriters Prepare For A Custody Battle

Members of the disco group Lipps, Inc., including Steven Greenberg (far left), pose for a portrait in 1978. Greenberg, who wrote the group's hit "Funkytown," is seeking to reclaim the song's full copyright from Universal Music Group.
Michael Ochs Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:48 pm

You might say Steven Greenberg is the mayor of Funkytown. Back in 1979, Greenberg was just another young musician and producer in Minneapolis. Then his group Lipps, Inc. recorded a song that would come to dominate the dance floors and airwaves in the summer of 1980, and for a long time afterward.

Read more
Parallels
5:00 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

As The Revolution Fades, Tunisia Begins To Splinter

People gather outside the Constituent Assembly headquarters during a protest to demand the ouster of the Islamist-dominated government, in Tunis, Tunisia, on July 28.
Anis Mili Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 9:35 pm

For Tunisia's ruling Islamist party, Ennahda, what happened this summer in Egypt is a cautionary tale and a constant reminder of the risks it faces as it navigates through its own political crisis.

In Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood easily dominated all post-revolutionary elections, only to be ousted by the military in July. Brotherhood supporters now carry yellow placards, a reminder of the military crackdown, and that same placard now hangs on Ennahda's headquarters in the Tunisian capital, Tunis.

Read more
Book Reviews
3:38 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

In These 'Gardens,' The Tree Rings Of The Radical Left

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:48 pm

Mohsin Hamid's latest novel is called How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.

Jonathan Lethem's latest novel, Dissident Gardens, is expansive in scale. Chronologically speaking, it begins in the 1930s with Communist Party meetings in the U.S. It passes through the rise of McCarthyism, the establishment of the New York Mets, the hippie Age of Aquarius and the AIDS crisis. It ventures briefly abroad, to such places as behind-the-Iron-Curtain East Germany and war-torn Nicaragua. It ends in the Obama era of Occupy sit-ins and a rampant TSA.

Read more
Sports
2:30 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Pioneer Billie Jean King Moved The Baseline For Women's Tennis

Billie Jean King, seen here in 1977, learned to play tennis on the public courts near her Long Beach, Calif., home.
Kathy Willens AP/Press Association Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:03 pm

Women's tennis champion Billie Jean King is best remembered for her 1973 exhibition match, known as "The Battle of the Sexes," with self-proclaimed male chauvinist Bobby Riggs. But King also had a remarkable career, both as a tennis player and as a trailblazer for women: She won a record 20 Wimbledon titles, six of them for singles, and she led an uprising of underpaid female players to demand fairer treatment and compensation in professional tennis.

Read more

Pages