NPR Story
4:25 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Man Who Made Nintendo Into A Video Game Empire Dies

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We're going to keep playing in the world of videogames now and hit pause to remember one man's life.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO GAME NOISES)

SIEGEL: Hiroshi Yamauchi.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO GAME NOISES)

SIEGEL: Yamauchi was the president of Nintendo for more than 50 years. He died Thursday in Japan, at the age of 85. Yamauchi oversaw the company's transformation, from manufacturing playing cards to producing video games. And he helped make Nintendo the household name it is today.

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The Salt
4:25 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Making Food From Flies (It's Not That Icky)

Black soldier flies mate and lay eggs inside these cages at EnviroFlight.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:14 pm

In the quirky little college town of Yellow Springs, Ohio, home to many unconventional ideas over the years, there's now a small insect factory.

It's an unassuming operation, a generic boxy building in a small industrial park. It took me a while even to find a sign with the company's name: EnviroFlight. But its goal is grand: The people at EnviroFlight are hoping that their insects will help our planet grow more food while conserving land and water.

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Shots - Health News
4:25 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Boston Hospitals Share Lessons From Marathon Bombing

A Boston police officer wheels an injured boy down Boylston Street as medical workers carry an injured runner after the Boston Marathon bombing in April.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 10:10 am

Boston hospitals say that overall they did well in their response to the bombings because, as crazy as it sounds, they got lucky on April 15.

Dr. Richard Wolfe, chief of emergency medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, says hospitals were fortunate with both the location and timing of the bombs that stunned the city.

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Book Reviews
3:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

A Predictably Pynchonian Take On The Internet And Sept. 11

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:07 pm

I approached this review with a little bit of dread. How do you write about the iconic novelist Thomas Pynchon, whose books are strange and difficult things, and whose die-hard readers gather online to wax poetic, and use words like Pynchonian, Pynchonalia and Pynchonesque? They are just so into him, and often so articulate about their love. If you read the thoughtful and detailed writing by Pynchon devotees, they make a very persuasive case.

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Author Interviews
2:06 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Years After Historic Ruling, Execution Still A 'Random' Justice

Execution witness Don Reid stands in the death chamber of the Texas State Penitentiary on July 31, 1972, where he officially watched 189 men die in the heavy oak electric chair. The Supreme Court struck down capital punishment on June 29 of that year.
AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:44 pm

In the mid-1970s, Arkansas' electric chair was being used by the prison barber to cut hair, and the execution chamber in New Hampshire was being used to store vegetables. That's because in 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court shocked the nation by striking down Georgia's death penalty law, effectively ending executions in the United States. But the decision provoked a strong backlash among those who favored the death penalty, and within four years the high court reversed course and issued a set of rulings that would permit the resumption of executions.

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All Tech Considered
1:07 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

How To Spot And Outfake Bogus Twitter Followers

A hashtag in the digital age.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:15 pm

If you're on Twitter, you might want to think twice before bragging about all those followers you've been racking up. Some of the people who follow you might be fake — and there are now websites designed to expose them.

NPR's product manager for social media, Kate Myers, talks to Tell Me More's Michel Martin about how to spot fake accounts, why they might be following you and what you can do to stop them.


Interview Highlights

On tallying fake Twitter followers

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Arts & Life
12:35 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

'House Of Lies' Star Don Cheadle On How To Make It In Hollywood

Don Cheadle is known his roles in Hotel Rwanda, Crash and Ocean's Eleven.
Eric Charbonneau AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:15 pm

Don Cheadle may be one of Hollywood's quietest superstars. He was known for having high impact in supporting roles before Hotel Rwanda catapulted him to fame. He earned an Oscar nomination for playing the real-life hotel manager who protected more than a thousand Tutsis from the Hutu militia during the Rwandan civil war. Cheadle appeared in other critical and box office hits like Crash and Flight. He's now earned an Emmy nomination for his role in the TV show House of Lies.

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Economy
12:08 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

War On Poverty Still Worth Fighting?

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:54 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Meet Armando, Sesame Street's Newest Neighbor

Ismael Cruz Cordova as Armando, with Muppets Rosita and Elmo.
Gil Vaknin

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:15 pm

Sesame Street kicked off its new season this week, and it's putting a special focus on Hispanic heritage. There's also a new character on the block: Armando (also known as Mando). He's played by actor Ismael Cruz Cordova, who was born and raised in Puerto Rico. He earned a bachelor's in fine arts from New York University and has appeared in several films and the CBS drama The Good Wife. He's currently performing off-Broadway.

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Music Reviews
11:16 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Robbie Fulks: Exhilarating And Bitter On 'Gone Away Backward'

Robbie Fulks' new album is titled Gone Away Backward.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 2:06 pm

Robbie Fulks has been recording since the mid-'90s, making music that's difficult to categorize. He's written country songs about how compromised most country music is, and while he's fond of folk and bluegrass, he pleases concert audiences with covers of hits by Michael Jackson and Cher. Fulks' new album, Gone Away Backward, is one of his most sustained and subtle efforts.

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Kalamazoo City Manager
11:08 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Former Kalamazoo City Manager candidate takes job in Missouri

Kalamazoo City Hall - file photo
Credit WMUK

Matt Zimmerman removed his name from consideration for the job in Kalamazoo last week. 

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Whale Of A Fine: JPMorgan Chase To Pay $920M In Penalties

The JPMorgan Chase building in London, where traders ran up huge losses.
Timur Emek AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 11:39 am

JPMorgan Chase has agreed to acknowledge that it violated federal securities laws and will pay $920 million in penalties assessed by regulators in the U.S. and U.K. to settle charges related to the huge trading losses racked up by its London traders last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced Thursday morning.

As we wrote earlier this week when word of the pending settlement first emerged, this all:

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WMU enrollment
9:38 am
Thu September 19, 2013

WMU enrollment figures show increase in new freshmen

file photo
Credit WMUK

Smaller upper level classes led to an overall decrease. 

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6:58 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Census figures show income holding in Michigan

Lead in text: 
Household median income in state was virtually unchanged at $46,859 in 2012
Michigan's economy is showing signs of recovery, with median incomes holding steady after years of decline, but the number of people in poverty has stagnated, new Census data released today show. For the state, it marked the first time since 2007 that incomes didn't drop significantly, though they remain well below pre-recession levels.
6:14 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Holland City Council approves study for Civic Center

Lead in text: 
Market study will examine options for 60 year old facility
Roughly $30,000 will be spent on a study that could help determine the possible future uses of the Holland Civic Center. The Holland City Council voted Wednesday to approve the expenditure.
Around the Nation
6:13 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Jail In Yonkers, N.Y., Is Put On The Real Estate Market

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

The key to the real estate is location, location, location. In this case, the location is a jail. Authorities in Yonkers, New York put a lockup on the market. They're asking two-a-half-million dollars for a building that may need renovation, but does have a Hudson River view. Rent laws can make it hard for the buyers of a building to evict the old tenants, but not in this case. We're told the inmates will be moved out on Sunday.

Europe
6:13 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Exhibit In Scotland Showcases Miniature Books

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. There's a teensy tiny exhibit at the National Library of Scotland showcasing miniature books. One of the world's smallest is a version of the nursery rhyme "Old King Cole" no bigger than a grain of rice. Back in the 1800s, one Scottish publisher discovered that a poorly selling copy of poems by Robert Burns became a bestseller when he miniaturized it, starting a tradition there of wee little tomes, not so much read as collected. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
3:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Census Bureau Survey Indicates How Americans Live

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep with some new information about us. The Census Bureau conducts the American Community Survey every year. It's an annual snapshot of who Americans are and how we live, and it's kind of like Christmas morning for demographers such as William Frey of the Brookings Institution. We asked him what trends he sees this year.

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NPR Story
3:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Feds Say NYC Building Is A Front For Iran

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the last few days we've learned that Iran has released political prisoners and that its new president and President Obama have written each other. Also suggesting a thaw in the relationship, both leaders expressed a desire to resolve their countries' dispute over Iran's nuclear program. These seeming overtures come as President Hassan Rouhani prepares to fly to New York to address the U.N.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

France Moves To Ban Kids Under 16 From Beauty Pageants

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The French Senate voted to ban beauty pageants for children under 16. The measure is part of a larger bill on women's rights.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that lawmakers see this move as a way to protect the young from being sexualized.

(SOUNDBITE OF A DOCUMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (French spoken)

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Shots - Health News
3:20 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Employers Trim Health Costs By Cutting Coverage For Spouses

Workers prepare orders to be loaded for shipment at a UPS Healthcare Supply Chain and Distribution Center in Atlanta on March 12. The company recently announced that it would no longer offer coverage for spouses who had their own job-based insurance.
Robin Nelson Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 10:05 am

When UPS told workers that it would no longer offer health coverage for spouses who had their own job-based insurance, it caused a big stir. But the shipping giant has plenty of company.

So many employers are trying to cut back on health coverage for spouses that it has become a trend. The practice began well before the Affordable Care Act passed, and the connection to the law, in some cases, isn't that direct.

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Television
3:19 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Dean Norris, Breaking Out Of That Good-Guy Mold

Breaking Bad, on which Dean Norris played DEA agent Hank Schrader, has two more episodes to go before its series finale.
Ursula Coyote AMC

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

Actor Dean Norris took to Twitter the other day. "Missed last night's Breaking Bad," he wrote. "Heard it was intense. Filmed several alternate versions. Can't wait to see what they used."

Please note: There's a spoiler farther down this page.

Norris plays — played? — a drug enforcement agent on the acclaimed AMC series, which wraps for good after just two more episodes. His character's brother-in-law is a chemistry teacher with cancer who, at the series' outset, gets into cooking methamphetamine to pay for his treatment.

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Art & Design
3:18 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Exhibit Explores How Dior's Designs Echo Impressionist Paintings

Laziz Hamani

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:44 am

When it was time to create a new collection, Christian Dior had a ritual: He went to his garden and sat down among the flowers.

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9:02 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Michigan unemployment rate rises for third straight month

Lead in text: 
Jobless rate hits 9% but payroll jobs grew by 8,000 in August
LANSING - Michigan's unemployment rate rose for the third consecutive month to 9 percent in August, the highest recorded in 2013. The rate rose from 8.8 percent in July. Still, the August unemployment rate was down from 9.3 percent in the same month last year, according to data released Wednesday by the Michigan Department of Technology, Management & Budget.
8:57 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Schuitmaker to seek re-election in new Senate district

Lead in text: 
New 26th Senate district includes Van Buren, Allegan and part of Kent Counties.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PAW PAW, MI - State Sen. Tonya Schuitmaker announced today that she will seek re-election in the new 26th District, ending speculation surrounding which district she would choose to run in Schuitmaker currently represents the 20th District, which includes all of Kalamazoo County, as well as Paw Paw and Antwerp townships in Van Buren County.
Latin America
5:26 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Brazil's Traffic Is A Circus, So Send In The Clowns

The Brazilian city of Olinda has a novel approach to taming its ever-growing traffic problem: traffic clowns known as palhacos.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

On a busy avenue in Olinda, in northeastern Brazil, two men in wigs, big red noses and full clown makeup are squeaking horns and making a good-natured ruckus.

"Where's your helmet?" shouts one as a motorcyclist whizzes by. "Fasten your seat belt!" calls out the other.

Uncle Honk and Fom Fom are traffic clowns, or palhacos, hired by the city to make the roads a bit safer. They lean into traffic, making exaggerated gestures, like the sweep of the arm to mimic fastening a seat belt, and a mimed reminder to never drink and drive.

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Business
5:24 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

The Man Who Made Toyota A Modern Success Dies At 100

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

A giant of the auto business died yesterday, a few days after he turned 100. Eiji Toyoda was president and later chairman of Toyota. The family name is T-O-Y-O-D-A. Toyoda played a key role in the company going worldwide, especially Toyota's move into the U.S. market. Micheline Maynard covers the automotive industry. She's a contributing editor for Forbes these days. Welcome to the program.

MICHELINE MAYNARD: Thanks for having me, Robert.

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Theater
5:24 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Daniel Craig Heads Back To Broadway With 'Betrayal'

Daniel Craig, at right, is probably best known as the current incarnation of James Bond. He's in rehearsal now for a Broadway production of Harold Pinter's Betrayal, alongside Rafe Spall and Rachel Weisz — who plays his wife, and is that in real life, too.
Brigitte Lacombe

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

A revival of Harold Pinter's play Betrayal is in rehearsal now in New York. It's the story of an affair, and it unfolds backward in time, from the lovers sharing a post-romantic drink to the passion they first experienced seven years earlier. Along the way, much deception — betrayal, even — is revealed.

Daniel Craig, who stars as the jilted Robert, tells NPR's Robert Siegel that the show, first performed in 1978, still feels "surprisingly contemporary. ... When you have someone as good as Pinter, it remains timeless. And the themes are timeless. It's just good writing."

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WMUK News
4:31 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Confronting privilege, race and gender

Cover of Allan G. Johnson's book
Credit Allan G. Johnson

Author Allan Johnson says says privilege is at the heart of the nation’s problems with race and gender. Johnson, who is the author of Privilege, Power and Difference, will give a public presentation on “Unraveling the Knot of Race” on Thursday, September 19th, at 5:30 p.m.

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Ecstatic Voices
4:24 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Sacred Strings Guide Gospel Through Thunder And Steel

The Sacred Steel tradition is an integral part of worship. From the House of God Keith Dominion Church, Aubrey Ghent (pictured) helped revive the style in 1990s.
Brad Gregory Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:01 pm

Some say the purpose of church is to deliver the word of God. If so, what's the role of music in the service?

"The music has always been a part of God's way of getting people's attention," says Bishop Calvin Worthem, pastor at the Church of the Living God in Toccopola, Miss. "Sometimes he speaks through the thunder, the lightning, and sometimes he speaks in the music."

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