Around the Nation
4:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Firefighters Battle To Get A Grip On Calif. Rim Fire

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:15 am

In California, there are more than 4,500 firefighters battling the wildfire burning in and around Yosemite National Park. The Rim Fire is more than 300 square miles in size. Crews have been making progress by doing controlled burns of things like brush that would feed a bigger blaze.

Sports
4:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

2013 College Football Season Opens On Thursday

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 6:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, college football fans, it is time to get out your body paint and those foam fingers. The NCAA Division One football season is starting tonight with 17 games on the schedule. Most of the heavyweights start their campaigns on Saturday, and that includes top-ranked Alabama. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins me to preview the new season. And Tom, are you excited?

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Sure. Are you?

Read more
Environment
3:35 am
Thu August 29, 2013

A Cooler Pacific May Be Behind Recent Pause In Global Warming

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 11:47 am

A study in the journal Nature could help explain why the Earth's average temperature hasn't increased during the past 15 years — despite a long-term trend of global warming.

The Earth's average temperature has risen by more than 1 degree Fahrenheit since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. But the temperature rise has not been moving in lock step with the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide — mainly from burning fossil fuels — traps heat in the air.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:34 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Post-Katrina New Orleans A Story Of Modern Pioneering

Ronald Lewis, a resident of the Lower 9th Ward, says eight years after Hurricane Katrina, rebuilding his neighborhood is a story still in progress.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 10:44 am

It's been eight years to the day since Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast. To mark the anniversary, NPR revisits neighborhood activist and curator Ronald Lewis, a New Orleans resident whom Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep regularly checked in with in the months after the storm.

Read more
The Salt
3:33 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings

A Flock of Dumpling Ducklings: What's inside? Roasted Beijing duck, of course.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 7:52 pm

All week, we've been talking about dumplings — from tortellini's sensual origins in Italy to kubbeh's tasty variations in Israel.

But perhaps no country has a longer history or greater variety of dumplings than China. Dumplings come in all shapes and with every imaginable filling. They are served at everything from a humble family meal to elaborate works of culinary art.

Read more
The NPR 100
6:20 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Inspiring Force Of 'We Shall Overcome'

American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger (left) adopted and helped popularize "We Shall Overcome" by teaching the song at rallies and protests. Here he sings with activists in Greenwood, Miss., in 1963.
Adger Cowans Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:26 pm

As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, All Things Considered concludes its series about the moments that defined the historic summer of 1963. Back in 1999, Noah Adams explored the history and legacy of the song "We Shall Overcome" for the NPR 100. The audio link contains a condensed version of that piece.

Read more
5:16 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Don't touch the water at North Beach

Lead in text: 
North Beach in South Haven is closed due to high levels of E. Coli bacteria.
SOUTH HAVEN, MI -- A public health advisory has been issued for South Haven 's North Beach following excessive levels of E. coli found in the water on Tuesday. The beach is closed to swimmers and visitors are told to avoid any contact with the water.
Shots - Health News
5:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

In South Africa, A Clinic Focuses On Prostitutes To Fight HIV

A prostitute in Johannesburg waits for a client on a street corner. An estimated two-thirds of sex workers in South Africa are HIV positive.
Yoav Lemmer AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:25 pm

South Africa has come a long way in dealing with AIDS. The country has been successful in getting drug treatment to millions of people infected with HIV.

But the country still has one of the highest rates of HIV infection in the world — and the virus continues to spread. Nearly 400,000 South Africans are infected with HIV each year.

One health clinic in the heart of Johannesburg is attempting to break the HIV cycle by focusing on people at extremely high risk for infection — prostitutes.

Read more
Middle East
4:52 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Rep. Mike Rogers: Evidence Against Assad Is Convincing

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:39 pm

Robert Siegel talks with Republican Representative Mike J. Rogers, chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, about his briefing on evidence regarding the chemical attack in Syria, and whether he still has questions about whether the Syrian government is responsible or not.

Media
4:52 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Kelly McEvers Reflects On Middle East Reporting As She Leaves Region

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:39 pm

Melissa Block has an exit interview with Kelly McEvers, who's ending a grueling years-long assignment in the Middle East that included coverage of Iraq, Syria and beyond. McEvers and her NPR colleague Deborah Amos, won four major awards in 2012 for coverage of the Syrian conflict.

NPR Story
4:52 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Teen Victoria Duval Pulls Off Major Upset At U.S. Open

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:39 pm

American teenager Victoria Duval pulled off a first round upset at the U.S. Open last night when she beat the 2011 tennis champ Samantha Stosur.

2:49 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

News service for the blind to be extended six months

Lead in text: 
Officials will use the six month extension to find out “accurate levels of use and service.”
State funding for a service that gives blind people in Michigan access to hundreds of newspapers and magazines has been extended for six months while officials try to determine "accurate levels of use and service," an official said today.
2:39 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Wi-Fi to be available on Amtrak rides

Lead in text: 
The Michigan Department of Transportation is shelling out a million dollars to allow riders to surf the web. A spokesman for M-DOT says the cost will hopefully be offset by increased ridership and more revenue.
LANSING - Amtrak passengers will be able to catch up on email and surf the web while riding trains through Michigan starting next year. The Michigan Department of Transportation is spending about $1 million to install Wi-Fi by January. MDOT anticipates the service will lead to increased ridership and revenues that should more than offset the cost, said spokesman Nick Schirripa.
Movie Reviews
1:27 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Reaching Across What's Broken, 'Short Term' Fix Or No

In Short Term 12 — named for the youth facility where it's primarily set — John Gallagher Jr. and Brie Larson play young counselors not too far removed from their own adolescent struggles.
Cinedigm

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 4:02 pm

It's easy to make fun of a certain kind of therapeutic language — the kind you hear all through the movie Short Term 12.

That title comes from the name of a group home for abused and/or unstable teens. Early on, a young counselor named Grace (Brie Larson) tells one smart-mouthed kid that "your attitude is not helping either one of us" — which would tend to make her a repressive drag in a typical Hollywood teen picture.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:12 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Diverse Gut Microbes, A Trim Waistline And Health Go Together

The tale of the tape may be told, in part, by the microbes inside you.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:39 pm

Scientists have discovered new clues about how microbes in our digestive systems may affect health.

European researchers found that the less diverse those microbes are, the more likely people are to gain weight, become obese and develop risk factors for serious health problems.

Evidence has been mounting in recent years that bacteria and other organisms in our bodies do a lot more than just help us digest food.

Read more
U.S.
12:33 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Crowd Amped Up For March On Washington Commemoration

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Fifty years ago today, more than a quarter million Americans stepped out of chartered buses, trains and cars and marched towards the foot of the Lincoln Memorial. This morning, thousands have come again to the nation's capital to retrace those steps and commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for jobs and freedom.

Read more
Late Night TV Week On Fresh Air
12:06 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Jimmy Kimmel: Making Late Night A Family Affair

Comedian Jimmy Kimmel interviews Mel Brooks on Jimmy Kimmel Live.
Randy Holmes ABC

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 1:16 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Jan. 29, 2013.

This year, Jimmy Kimmel's late-night ABC talk show, Jimmy Kimmel Live, joined the 11:35 p.m. nightly lineup — which put him in direct competition with two reining comedy kings: Jay Leno and Kimmel's idol, David Letterman.

Kimmel, who paid tribute to Letterman at the Kennedy Center Honors in December, didn't break the news to Letterman himself.

Read more
U.S.
11:29 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Rep. Lewis: 'I Gave A Little Blood Here And There'

Historical photos and memorabilia decorate the walls of Rep. Lewis' office.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 1:07 pm

On this day in 1963, thousands of people converged on Washington D.C. to march for jobs and freedom. It was a special moment in the struggle for civil rights, one that ended with Martin Luther King Jr.'s historic 'I Have a Dream' speech. But also on that podium was John Lewis, the head of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. At age 23, he was the youngest to speak that day. "Those who have said 'be patient and wait,' we must say that we cannot be patient," he told the crowd. "We do not want our freedom gradually, but we want to be free now."

Read more
Music
11:29 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Freedom Singer: 'Without Music, There Would Be No Movement'

Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 8:32 am

"Without the songs of the movement, personally I believe that there wouldn't have been a movement," says Rutha Mae Harris, one of the original Freedom Singers.

Fifty years ago, the Freedom Singers performed along with artists like Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, and Mahalia Jackson at the March on Washington.

Read more
Race
11:29 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Civil Rights Fight Of Today: Complacency?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We are continuing our coverage of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, which featured Martin Luther King Junior's famous "I Have a Dream" speech. Now, though, we want to turn from looking at the past to thinking about the future, and to do that, we've called a new generation of people who are leading the movement toward social justice forward, but each in their own way - in the streets, in the media, on the web and in the board room.

Read more
NPR Story
10:39 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Behind March On Washington's 'Sunny Reputation,' A Deep Fear

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 2:59 pm

The 1963 March on Washington didn't happen in a vacuum. Many racial demonstrations before that year — from the Freedom Rides to lunch counter sit-ins — had been met with horrific violence.

So when an estimated 250,000 descended on the nation's capital, "Washington was terrified," Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch tells Tell Me More host Michel Martin.

Read more
10:28 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Enbridge pipeline protester faces trial

Lead in text: 
Christopher Wahmhoff crawled into the finished pipeline on June 24 to protest construction of a replacement for the line that ruptured in July 2010, spilling nearly a million gallons of crude oil into the Kalamazoo River.
A Kalamazoo man who protested the building of a new Enbridge Inc. oil pipeline was ordered to stand trial on two felony charges Tuesday. He faces up to two years in prison if convicted. He also is charged with a misdemeanor of trespassing which carries a maximum of 30 days in jail.
SW Michigan
10:19 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Enbridge: $1 billion spent on oil spill cleanup

Worker monitors oil removal from Talmadge Creek in July 2010
Credit Paul Sancya / AP Photo

Enbridge Energy has spent over a billion dollars so far cleaning up the Kalamazoo River oil spill in 2010. That's according to the Gongwer News Service.

Read more
Around the Nation
8:47 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Garage Important To Watergate Scandal To Be Torn Down

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

The most famous buildings from the 1970s Watergate scandal is, naturally, the Watergate here in Washington, D.C. A close second has to be the parking garage nearby, where Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward met his source, Deep Throat. But now that historical location is about to become history. It's being torn down and going condo. In the film "All the President's Men," Deep Throat tells Woodward to follow the money. Sounds like the developers are doing just that.

Animals
8:47 am
Wed August 28, 2013

The Quick Brown Fox Jumped Into London Man's Bed

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A London man got quite the wake up call Tuesday morning. He felt what he thought was a nuzzle from his girlfriend lying next to him in bed, but when he rolled over he found himself face to face with a fox. It seems the girlfriend had gone to work and the animal had come in through the cat door.

8:01 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Oshtemo anti-discrimination ordinance passes

Lead in text: 
Trustee Dave Bushouse cast the lone dissenting vote, saying that he didn't think the township had jurisdiction on the issue.
The non-discrimination ordinance, closely modeled on one recently adopted by Kalamazoo Township, prohibits discrimination in housing, public accommodation or employment based on race, color, sex, age, religion, national origin, height, weight, marital status, familial status, citizenship, physical or mental disability, gender identity, sexual orientation or genetic information.
WMUK News
7:54 am
Wed August 28, 2013

WMU a "Best Bang for the Buck" school

"Reading Professor" statue near WMU's Chemistry Building
Credit WMUK

Washington Monthly magazine says Western Michigan University is among U-S universities that give students the "Best Bang for the Buck". The magazine put WMU in 46th place this year. The rankings are made based on the monthly's estimate of a school's contribution to the "public good" and the value students get compared to the money they pay.

Read more
WMUK News
7:27 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Michigan Senate passes Medicaid expansion

Gov. Rick Snyder, center, joins Detroit hospital officials on July 1, 2013, to discuss the Healthy Michigan plan.
Credit Carlos Osorio / AP Photo

The State Senate narrowly approved expansion of Medicaid coverage Tuesday. The Gongwer News Service says the final vote of 20-to-18 followed a one-vote rejection of the plan earlier in the day.

Read more

Kat Chow is a journalist covering race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's new Code Switch team. In this role, Chow is responsible for reporting and telling stories using social media, sparking conversations online, and blogging.

Prior to coming to NPR, Chow worked with WGBH in Boston and was a reporting fellow for The Cambodia Daily, an English-language newspaper in Phnom Penh.

Race
6:36 am
Wed August 28, 2013

One Historic March, Countless Striking Moments

More than 200,000 gather on the Washington Monument grounds before marching to the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963.
AP

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:26 pm

We started our historical Twitter account, @TodayIn1963, in June with the idea that we wanted to bring this monumental summer back to life with a modern take.

Read more

Pages