Arts & Life
2:30 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

The Internet's 'Twerk' Effect Makes Dictionaries Less Complete

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:45 pm

Evidently it was quite fortuitous. Just a couple of days after MTV's Video Music Awards, Oxford Dictionaries Online released its quarterly list of the new words it was adding. To the delight of the media, there was "twerk" at the top, which gave them still another occasion to link a story to Miley Cyrus' energetic high jinks.

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1:47 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

UPDATE: Senate passes animal shelter bill on gas chambers

Lead in text: 
The bill now heads to the state House for approval.
LANSING, MI -- A bill working its way through the Michigan Senate would ban the use of gas chambers to euthanize cats or dogs. Sponsoring state Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, said that animal control shelters in some Michigan counties use gas when it is necessary to euthanize a dog or cat despite the availability of lethal injection.
12:43 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Study finds Michigan cut education spending more than 33 other states since 2008

Lead in text: 
Inflation adjusted spending on education is $572 less per student than it was in 2008, according to report
Michigan has cut investment in K-12 schools by 9 percent since 2008, a deeper cut than 33 other states, according to a report released by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisan policy research organization based in Washington, D.C.
12:36 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Anti-missile defense system possible for Fort Custer

Lead in text: 
Sites in Vermont, Ohio, Maine and New York also being considered
WASHINGTON - Fort Custer Training Center near Battle Creek is one of five sites being considered for deployment of an anti-missile defense battery, according to Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vermont. There has been no decision to deploy an additional interceptor site in the United States, according to Leahy's office.
12:32 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Racial disparity grows in infant mortality

Lead in text: 
From 2006 to 2010 infant mortality rate was five times higher for blacks in Kalamazoo
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Kalamazoo is literally the land of The Promise, where a child who calls this city home can attend a Michigan college for free.
Movie Interviews
12:26 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Saudi's First Female Film Director Says Women Aren't Victims

Tobias Kownatzki Razor Film, Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 12:17 pm

"I wasn't trying to make a 'loud' film," Saudi Arabia's first female film director tells NPR's Michel Martin.

Haifaa Al Mansour's Wadjda is the first full-length feature film to be shot and produced in Saudi Arabia, and it lifts the veil on life in the kingdom.

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Law
12:12 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Losing Home Over $200? Tax Lien Fallout

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 3:29 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later this hour, two stories that suggest that hair has a weightier topic than many people might think. We'll speak with a man who had to take his seven-year-old out of school because she wore dreadlocks and we'll find out why the president of Venezuela is pressing the police to do something about hair thieves. That's coming up later.

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Race
11:58 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Second-Grader's Dreadlocks Cause For Concern?

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend some time now talking about hair. Yes, we are. If you think hair is inconsequential and not worthy of the attention of serious people, then we'd like to know why there've been reports of thieves in Venezuela holding women up at gunpoint to steal their hair. We're going to find out more about that in just a few minutes.

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Latin America
11:58 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Hair Thievery Is Serious Business In Venezuela

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 3:29 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Online sales tax
9:07 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Internet sales tax bill clears state House Committee

File photo
Credit The Associated Press

Interview with Alethia Kasben

So-called "Main Street Fairness" bills face an uncertain future in the full House. 

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Europe
7:25 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Pope Accepts Hand-Me-Down Car

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Picture now a boxy little 1984 four-door Renault with 190,000 miles. The perfect hand-me-down car for a teenager maybe, but the Pope? Well, Pope Francis accepted the keys to one over the weekend - a gift from a 70-year-old priest, Renzo Zocca of Verona. Pope Francis has famously shunned luxury items, including the popemobile, but he plans to drive this car himself around the Vatican grounds. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:18 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Texting Driver Ends Up All Wet

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Two kinds of news stories seem to come up again and again. The first is the guy who writes a text message about a drug deal and inadvertently sends it to the cops. This story, too, seems like it's happened more than once. A driver in Waldorf, Maryland lost control of her car while texting and landed in a lake. She was not hurt. She faces criminal charges. We do not know if her cell phone contract allows her a replacement when the phone gets wet.

6:27 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Albion College closed until Monday by severe storm

Lead in text: 
Electric service, phone service, hot water knocked out at college
ALBION - A powerful thunderstorm roared through Albion on Wednesday afternoon, knocking down trees and power lines and causing chaos for city residents and the Albion College community. More than 2,660 Consumers Energy customers were without power late Wednesday night after the storm blew through the area.
2014 election
6:20 am
Thu September 12, 2013

State Rep. Sean McCann announces state Senate bid

Sean McCann
Credit Sean McCann

The new 20th state Senate district will be made up of Kalamazoo County. 

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Jennifer works as a reporter, producer and student trainer for KSMU in Springfield, Mo. She grew up on a farm just outside West Plains, Mo., and now works for KSMU from her hometown.

Jennifer spent five years as a freelance journalist in the Persian Gulf, reporting for NPR and producing for CNN International’s program “Inside the Middle East.”

Jennifer studied at the American University in Cairo and graduated from the University of Missouri.

NPR Story
5:08 am
Thu September 12, 2013

A Check On The Housing Industry

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 6:51 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There is, of course, a lot of attention being paid about what's happening in Richmond because millions of other American homeowners around the country are also underwater - again, homes that are worth less than their mortgages. We're joined now by NPR correspondent Chris Arnold, who's been following all of this. Good morning.

CHRIS ARNOLD, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: How many homeowners are still underwater? I gather with the housing market coming back, this is changing - for the better.

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NPR Story
5:08 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Mill Closing Is 'Major Setback' For Ala. Town

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:27 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The world's largest paper producer says it's closing a mill in Alabama that employs 1,100 people. International Paper Company blames the closure in the town of Courtland on a decline in the demand for paper. Stan Ingold of Alabama Public Radio reports.

STAN INGOLD, BYLINE: The small town of Courtland, Alabama is reeling after the announcement by Memphis-based International Paper to close their mill. Diane Scanland is the executive director of the Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce.

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Around the Nation
5:06 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Missouri Tax Posturing May Influence Other States

Republican lawmakers in Missouri on Wednesday failed to override a tax veto by Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon. The controversial measure would have lowered state income taxes for the first time in decades.
Orlin Wagner AP

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:50 am

Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon used some fancy footwork to ensure his veto of a tax cut stayed in place — even though it faced a supermajority of Republicans in the Missouri House and Senate

Nixon said he vetoed the tax cut because the $700 million price tag was "unaffordable." But he knew in doing so, he was up against a lion of a legislature, with a veto-proof majority in both chambers.

Lawmakers on Wednesday failed to override Nixon's veto.

Dan Ponder, a political scientist at Drury University, says the governor had a decidedly uphill battle.

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Business
3:46 am
Thu September 12, 2013

5 Years After Financial Crisis, Are Big Banks Still A Threat?

The headquarters of Lehman Brothers in Times Square in 2008, the year the financial services firm filed for bankruptcy.
Hiroko Masuike Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 11:30 am

It's been five years since Lehman Brothers collapsed and touched off a banking crisis that is still being felt by the global economy. Today, the banking industry is a lot stronger than it was, but some critics say efforts to reform banking regulations have fallen short of their potential.

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Shots - Health News
3:45 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better

Physician Jim Olson cares for children with brain cancer in Seattle. His laboratory studies the gene expression programs controlling neural differentiation, brain tumor genesis and neurodegenerative diseases.
Courtesy of Susie Fitzhugh/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 6:58 am

Perhaps one of the most uncomfortable things a doctor has to tell patients is that their medical problems are iatrogenic. What that means is they were caused by a doctor in the course of the treatment.

Sometime these iatrogenic injuries are accidental. But sometimes, because of the limits of medical technology, they can be inevitable. Now, a medical researcher in Seattle thinks he has a way to eliminate some of the inevitable ones.

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Author Interviews
3:43 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Tired Of Inequality? One Economist Says It'll Only Get Worse

Economist Tyler Cowen believes that income inequality in America is only increasing. His new book is called Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation.
Szasz-Fabian Ilka Erika iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 9:57 am

Economist Tyler Cowen has some advice for what to do about America's income inequality: Get used to it. In his latest book, Average Is Over, Cowen lays out his prediction for where the U.S. economy is heading, like it or not:

"I think we'll see a thinning out of the middle class," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "We'll see a lot of individuals rising up to much greater wealth. And we'll also see more individuals clustering in a kind of lower-middle class existence."

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Code Switch
2:58 am
Thu September 12, 2013

For Native Americans, Mental Health Budget Cuts Hit Hard

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 9:49 am

Native American tribes gave up millions of acres to the federal government in the 19th century in exchange for promises of funded health care, education and housing. But time and again, those funds have been cut.

The recent across-the-board federal budget cuts, known as sequestration, are no exception. They came with a 5 percent reduction in funding for mental health services, including suicide prevention. That's especially troubling for Native Americans, whose suicide rate are four times the national average.

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Media
1:34 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Tina Brown To Leave The Daily Beast

The Daily Beast editor-in-chief Tina Brown plans to leave the website to produce live forums on news topics.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 9:41 am

Celebrity editor Tina Brown announced Wednesday that she's leaving The Daily Beast to launch her own media company. She has been a regular guest on Morning Edition. Brown, 59, plans to produce live forums on news topics.

Brown has edited some of the most prestigious publications: Vanity Fair, The New Yorker and Tattler. Five years ago, she helped found The Daily Beast — a news and opinion website. Now, the editor-in-chief says she's leaving to do what she calls "theatrical journalism" before live audiences.

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9:42 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Governor Rick Snyder leads in latest poll

Lead in text: 
EPIC-MRA poll shows governor with eight-point lead over former Congressman Mark Schauer of Battle Creek
Gov. Rick Snyder has an eight-point lead on the likely Democratic candidate in the 2014 governor's race, while the top candidates in the U.S. Senate race are in a statistical tie, according to a poll released exclusively Wednesday to the Free Press and WXYZ-TV (Channel 7).
9:39 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Drones to monitor crops in Hickory Corners

Lead in text: 
The unmanned planes will fly over agricultural fields
Michigan State University's first drone is a microdrone md4-1000, a four-rotor helicopter that measures just over a meter from rotor shaft to rotor shaft. It is equipped with a high-resolution radiometer, a thermal camera and a laser scanner that's capable of taking centimeter-precise measurements from the air.
9:30 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Street rods back in Kalamazoo this weekend

Lead in text: 
This will be the 27th year event has been held in Kalamazoo
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The National Street Rod Association will host the 34 th annual Street Rod Nationals North Plus this weekend at the Kalamazoo County Expo Center & Fairground. The Sept. 13-15 event will feature more than 2,500 street rods, muscle cars, specialty cars, custom cars and trucks, according to the NSRA, making it the largest such event in the region.
Politics
6:18 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Conservatives Use Budget Deadline To Revive Obamacare Debate

Linda Norman (right) and Joanna Galt, both from Florida, hold their banners during a rally against the health care law Tuesday outside the U.S. Capitol.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:03 pm

With the pause button pushed on the congressional debate over Syria, the House is turning its attention back to the issue that is expected to dominate the fall: the budget.

The long-running fight over spending and the debt is back. The House was supposed to act this week to avoid a government shutdown at the end of the month, and leaders had hoped to avoid drama. But the vote has been delayed, and drama is brewing.

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All Tech Considered
5:59 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Army Looks To Schools To Find The Next Cyberwarriors

Security experts say the U.S. is ill-prepared to respond to cyberthreats. A new high school curriculum in Alabama aims to attract more young people to the field.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:50 pm

You can literally see rockets when you drive into Huntsville, Ala., also known as the "Rocket City." NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is here, along with scores of aerospace and defense contractors. The city also has one of the largest fully digital school districts: 24,000 Huntsville City Schools students use laptops or tablets instead of textbooks.

All of this partly explains the new cybersecurity class at Grissom High School. Huntsville City Schools and U.S. Army Cyber Command are developing the curriculum, which will eventually begin in middle school.

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Music Interviews
5:44 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

'Singing Just To Me': Gregory Porter On Musical Inheritance

Gregory Porter's latest album is entitled Liquid Spirit.
Shawn Peters Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri December 13, 2013 2:14 pm

In his first semester playing football at San Diego State University, Gregory Porter severely injured his shoulder. Doctors told him his days on the field were over, but there was some good news: The school would let him keep his athletic scholarship. Suddenly without football, but with a lot of time on his hands, Porter searched for a new calling — and found it in his voice.

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The Salt
5:44 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Pets Or Livestock? A Moral Divide Over Horse Slaughter

Jamesport has the largest Amish community in Missouri, and horse-pulled buggies are often parked alongside cars. Horse owners in the state are divided over whether to allow horses to be killed for meat in the U.S.
Frank Morris for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:30 pm

Few Americans eat horse meat, and many don't like the idea of slaughtering horses. But a handful of investors are struggling to restart the horse-slaughter industry in the U.S.

Thousands of American horses are already slaughtered in Mexico and Canada each year for their meat, which gets shipped to European and Asian markets.

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