Book Reviews
1:30 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

From McDermott, An Extraordinary Story Of An Ordinary 'Someone'

The main character of Alice McDermott's Someone grew up in 1920s and '30s New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:27 pm

Endurance, going the distance, sucking up the solitude and the brine: I'm not talking about the glorious Diana Nyad and her instantly historic swim from Cuba to Key West, but of the ordinary heroine whose life is the subject of Alice McDermott's latest novel, Someone. "Ordinary" is a word that's used a lot to describe McDermott's characters, mostly Irish and working class, mostly un-heroic in any splashy way.

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Parallels
1:14 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

'We Are Next': Greek Jews Fear Rise Of Far-Right Party

Mois Yussuroum, a 94-year-old retired dentist, fought the Nazis as part of the Greek resistance during World War II. "Of the 650 Greek Jews who fought in the resistance, I'm the only one still alive," he says.
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

No one has ever doubted Mois Yussuroum's patriotism. As part of the Greek resistance during World War II, he fought Benito Mussolini's fascist army and then the Nazis.

"The other resistance fighters didn't know I was Jewish," he says, since he used the name "Yiorgos Gazis" in case he was captured. "But my superiors did know, and they gave me many responsibilities, including making me a garrison commander."

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12:13 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Marshall approves district for hospital expansion

Lead in text: 
Compromise was reached after dispute between Oaklawn Hospital and Marshall Neighborhood Association
MARSHALL - After months of refining an ordinance that would allow for future expansion of Oaklawn Hospital, the Marshall City Council on Monday evening approved the Hospital Campus Overlay District. Discussion on the ordinance was brief, but council members praised the effort and collaboration of the parties involved in the three-year discussion -- city staff, Oaklawn Hospital and members of the Marshall Neighborhood Association.
Politics
11:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

What Does America Think Of President Obama's 'Red Line?'

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:58 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good amount of time today hearing various points of view about how the U.S. and the international community should respond to events in Syria. Later, when we head into the Beauty Shop, we'll ask our panel of women journalists and commentators for their thoughts. And we also want to ask them about a list published by a business magazine of the smartest women on Twitter that was notably lacking in diversity. That's in just a few minutes.

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NPR Story
11:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Who Are The Smartest People On Twitter?

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, Sheila Bridges stood out for many reasons in her chosen field of interior design. Her celebrity client list, being African-American, but then she began to stand out in a way she did not want - she started losing her hair. We'll talk about how that changed her life and her focus. She talks about that in her new memoir "The Bald Mermaid." And we'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

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Music
11:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Emeli Sande: 'It's Always The Lyric That Gets Me'

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:58 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Not that hair is the only thing we care about, but now we're going to hear from a singer whose signature blonde platinum coif is one of the things that makes her stand out. We're talking about singer-songwriter Emeli Sande. She had the best-selling album in Britain in 2012.

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Recording session for WMUK's program "WestSouthwest"
Credit WMUK
WMUK
11:20 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Michigan Congressman Kerry Bentivolio will face primary challenge

Lead in text: 
Former state lawmakers Mike Bishop and Andrew "Rocky" Roczkowski are among supporters of challenger David Trott
WASHINGTON - Lawyer David Trott will enter the Republican primary next year to challenge freshman U.S. Rep. Kerry Bentivolio (R-Milford), a former reindeer rancher who took the nomination in 2012 despite a lack of mainstream support.
Around the Nation
7:06 am
Wed September 4, 2013

UMass Breaks Record For Largest Fruit Salad

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

7:01 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Benton Township considers tax assessment to pay for police protection

Lead in text: 
Retailers have been paying less in taxes because of successful appeals to the Michigan Tax Tribunal
BENTON TOWNSHIP - Facing declining tax revenue from its major retailers, Benton Township is considering a tax assessment on commercial properties so it can continue police patrols that target the business district, the retail hub of Berrien County.
Politics
6:58 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Sen. McCain Caught Playing Poker During Syria Hearing

During the more than three hour hearing on Tuesday, Sen. John McCain started playing poker on his phone. A photographer for The Washington Post snapped the photo. McCain confessed on Twitter, and said, "Worst of all I lost."

Fronteras Senior Field Correspondent Mónica Ortiz Uribe (KRWG, Las Cruces) is a native of El Paso, Texas, where she worked as a freelance reporter prior to joining the Fronteras team.  She also anchors segments on KRWG-TV's Fronteras program.

Business
6:51 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Latino Buying Power Gets Movie Studios' Attention

Instructions Not Included, a film starring and directed by Eugenio Derbez, was made specifically for a Mexican and U.S. Latino audience.
Pantelion Films

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:12 am

One of the surprise movie hits this past weekend was almost entirely in Spanish. Instructions Not Included made an enormous amount of money per screen, more than $22,000, playing in fewer than 350 theaters. The boys in One Direction had the number one film, but they pulled in less than $6000 per screen. That's a huge victory for star Eugenio Derbez, a household name in Mexico, and for Pantelion films, which has been trying to find a Spanish-language hit in the U.S. film market for a few years now.

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Sports
6:50 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Pirates End Decades Of Losing Seasons

The Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Milwaukee Brewers Tuesday night for the team's 81st win of the season. That win guarantees the Pirates will not have a losing season this year — as it has since 1993.

Around the Nation
6:42 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Water Dispute Heightens Tensions Between U.S., Mexico

Mexico and the United States are supposed to share water according to a 70-year-old treaty that aims to protect each nation's needs. But prolonged drought is testing that relationship. Mexico is behind by 38 percent on its deliveries.

6:14 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Kalamazoo County Board approves settlement over death of inmate

Lead in text: 
Estate of woman who died in 2011 in withdrawal from heroin to receive $1.75-million
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - The Kalamazoo County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to approve two settlements stemming from recent lawsuits, one of which totaled $1.75 million. The $1.75 million settlement resolve a wrongful death dispute with the estate of Andrea Suzanne Armstead, who died at the Kalamazoo County Jail on Nov.
6:03 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Battle Creek City Commission approves anti-discrimination ordinance, raise for city manager

Lead in text: 
One commissioner votes against ordinance providing protection against discrimination for lesbian, gays, bisexual and transgender people
Despite a handful of residents who spoke out in opposition, Battle Creek City Commissioners voted 6-3 to grant City Manager Ken Tsuchiyama a 2 percent raise Tuesday night. The move increases Tsuchiyama's annual salary to $124,950 from $122,500. Vice Mayor Elizabeth Fulton and commissioners Jeff Domenico and Dave Walters cast the dissenting votes.
Middle East
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Obama Considers Training Options For Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama has promised limited military action against Syria. He says missile strikes are not about regime change and there will be no boots on the ground. But even as the Congress debates the president's plans for action, the White House is looking at broader options.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports the president may call on the U.S. military to help build up the Syrian opposition.

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World
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Congress Should Examine Fine Print When Voting On Syria

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And as Congress prepares to vote on authorizing force, Yale Law Professor Stephen L. Carter has some advice.

STEPHEN L. CARTER: The one thing I would strongly recommend is that members of Congress actually read the resolution before deciding whether to vote for it or not.

MONTAGNE: He says it's hard to approve of a president waging war while still limiting the power the president is given.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Las Vegas Gambles On Unique Business Incubator

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:12 am

The Downtown Container Park will set up budding entrepreneurs in repurposed shipping containers. The park will have 35 containers and a bunch of modular cubes like you'd normally see at a construction site — all to house local businesses.

Shots - Health News
3:43 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Hospital Patients, Observation Status Can Prove Costly

The next bed could cost you a lot if the hospital says you're there on observation.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:25 am

If you're on Medicare and you're in the hospital for a few days, you may think you're an inpatient. The hospital may have other ideas. Increasingly, hospitals are placing older patients on "observation status." They may be there for days, but technically they're still outpatients.

This is a big deal for someone on Medicare because follow-up treatment in a nursing home isn't covered unless someone has been an inpatient for at least three days. That's leaving some seniors on the hook for thousands of dollars in nursing home bills.

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Law
3:34 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Is It Legal For Undocumented Immigrant To Practice Law?

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference on Aug. 27. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the United States illegally. California State Bar officials have not issued him a lawyer's license because of his immigration status.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:44 pm

On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court holds oral arguments in a case that will determine whether Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant, can become a licensed attorney.

The case has drawn attention from legal groups across the country and comes amid the larger national fight over immigration reform.

On the side of Garcia are the State Bar of California and the California attorney general. Opposing his admission to the bar is the Justice Department, among others.

'This Is The Country I Know'

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Emily's been at NHPR since the spring of 2012.  She worked on NPR's StateImpact project for one year, covering business & economy in New Hampshire, before transitioning to covering the Seacoast Region, where she lives presently.

Before coming to NHPR, Emily was the associate programmer for Public Radio Remix, with Roman Mars (of 99% Invisible); hosted and produced Youthcast, a podcast from the Public Radio Exchange; and worked on other freelance projects in Boston. Emily studied cello performance and music composition at the California Institute of the Arts, then fell in love with public radio while schlepping between gigs on LA freeways.

Contact

All Tech Considered
3:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Biographers, The Past Is An Open (Electronic) Book

Digital ephemera can capture things that don't appear in official accounts of events — but the material's in danger of disappearing if it's in obsolete formats.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 1:00 pm

For centuries, biographers have relied on letters to bring historical figures to life, whether Gandhi or Catherine the Great. But as people switch from writing on paper to documenting their lives electronically, biographers are encountering new benefits — and new challenges.

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The Salt
3:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Small Farmers In New England Fear New Food Safety Rules

Joe Buley owns Screamin' Ridge Farm in Montpelier, Vt. He says the FDA's new food safety rules threaten the viability of small New England farm operations like his. Here, Buley harvests cucumbers.
Emily Corwin

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Back in January, the Food and Drug Administration issued two proposed food safety rules to prevent tainted food from entering the food supply.

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Science
3:04 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Bald Eagles Are Back In A Big Way — And The Talons Are Out

Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary, and biology graduate student Courtney Turrin, survey eagle behavior along the James River in late-summer.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 8:48 pm

"It's a jungle if you're an eagle right now on the Chesapeake Bay," says Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. "You have to watch your back."

Americans have long imagined their national symbol as a solitary, noble bird soaring on majestic wings. The birds are indeed gorgeous and still soar, but the notion that they are loners is outdated, Watts and other conservationists are finding.

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Sweetness And Light
2:15 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Keep Athletes Eligible But Uneducated?

Ersin Kisacik iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:31 pm

Each football season brings exciting plays and game heroes, but Frank Deford says the real heroes are often overlooked.

As another school year and college football season gets underway, Deford looks at the frustrations and challenges facing educators to keep student athletes eligible.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

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9:12 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Study finds blacks targeted for traffic stops by Kalamazoo Public Safety

Lead in text: 
Results of study released during Tuesday's Kalamazoo City Commission meeting
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Black motorists are more than two times as likely to be stopped by police in the city of Kalamazoo than a white person behind the wheel.
5:14 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Amash to hold Syria discussion Wed. in Battle Creek

Lead in text: 
U.S. Representative Justin Amash is against a military strike against Syria and questions the constitutionality of President Obama’s actions.
U.S. Rep. Justin Amash, R-Cascade Township, will speak with locals this week to hear their opinions on a possible U.S. military strike against Syria. The congressman said he will host an event at the Main Street Beanery at 113 W. Michigan Avenue in Marshall at 10 a.m.
Business
5:04 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Spirit Airlines Sees Business Take Off With Raunchy Ads

Spirit Airlines has gotten notice — and criticism — for its racy ads.
Courtesy of Spirit Airlines

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:22 pm

South Florida-based Spirit Airlines is known for being cheap. It boasts "ultralow" base fares and then charges for items such as carry-on luggage or printing out your boarding pass at the airport.

That thrift carries over to Spirit's advertising. Even compared with other low-cost airlines, Spirit spends almost nothing on ads. And yet the company makes a surprising splash with its campaigns. A visit to Spirit headquarters reveals the secrets of its marketing.

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