7:34 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Portage School Board to decide Thursday which candidates for Superintendent will get second interviews

Lead in text: 
Two candidates interviewed Wednesday, one more scheduled for Thursday
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI -- Roger Rathburn and Catherine Cost come from very different school districts, but they offered very similar perspectives on effective leadership and instruction during their public interviews Wednesday for the job of Portage Public Schools superintendent.
Power out
7:16 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Power outages throughout Southwest Michigan

Credit WMUK

Strong storms have left thousands of people without power in Southwest Michigan Thursday morning.

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Around the Nation
7:09 am
Thu June 13, 2013

U.S. Navy To Make Its Communications Less 'Rude'

The Navy has been issuing orders and messages in capital letters since the 1850s when teletype machines didn't have lower case. But to young sailors, raised on texting, "all CAPS" signifies shouting.

Around the Nation
7:03 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Rare 'Superman' Comic Sells For Big Bucks

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer. A rare copy of the comic book featuring Superman's first appearance sold for $175,000 this week. Considered the "Holy Grail" of comics by many collectors, it is one of about 100 copies. Published in 1938, the comic was found by David Gonzalez in the insulation of a house that he was restoring in Minnesota. The selling price is ten times what he paid for the house. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Parallels
6:02 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Iran's Election May Not Really Be About Picking A President

Female supporters of Iranian presidential candidate Saeed Jalili, Iran's top nuclear negotiator, hold up posters and national flags at a campaign rally in Tehran, Iran, on May 24. Jalili advocates for traditional roles for women and resistance against the U.S.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:55 am

When Iranians vote Friday for president, it will be an election unlike any other.

Clerics who hold supreme power in the Islamic Republic have allowed elections for decades.

But while the people vote, clerics and their allies make the rules. Those already in power choose who can run for office and limit what they do if elected.

Restrictions are tighter than ever after massive protests that followed a disputed election in 2009. In fact, the country has come to redefine the whole purpose of an election.

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Animals
4:34 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Fancy Feet: Wild Cheetahs Excel At Acceleration

Moyo, a 3-year-old male cheetah from South Africa, chases a lure during the Cheetah Dash event at the Animal Ark in Reno, Nev.
Kevin Clifford AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:02 am

Nature documentaries always go on and on about how fast a cheetah can run. Cats in captivity have been clocked at 65 miles an hour, the highest speed recorded for any land animal.

And yet, scientists know very little about how the animal runs in the wild, especially when on the hunt.

"You can look at it and say, 'Oh that's fast,' " says Alan Wilson, a veterinarian at the Royal Veterinary College, London. "But you can't actually describe what route it follows, or how quickly it's gone, or the details of [the] forces it has to exert to do that."

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Digital Life
4:33 am
Thu June 13, 2013

From Seinfeld, A Second Season Of 'Coffee' Talk

Jerry Seinfeld won a 2013 Webby Award for Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee.
Bryan Bedder Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:01 am

Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee is exactly what it sounds like — a show about three things Jerry Seinfeld loves.

Each individual episode of the stand-up comic's Web series features him talking to a fellow comedian while driving across town to get a cup of coffee.

While the premise is simple enough, and the celebrity interview as familiar as any late-night talk-show, the format of C3 allows for a more relaxed and personal tone than the typical sofa-chat format.

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Parallels
4:28 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Once Home To A Dreaded Drug Lord, Medellin Remakes Itself

Colombian army soldiers patrol Medellin's Loma de Cristobal neighborhood after warring gangs forced dozens of families to flee. Medellin used to be the most dangerous city in the world, but officials embarked on innovative projects designed to make life better in tough neighborhoods.
Paul Smith for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:03 pm

Of all the violent cities of Latin America, one stands out as a great success story: Medellin, a metropolis nestled in the mountains of northwest Colombia.

Once the home of the cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar, it recorded more than 6,300 homicides in 1991, making it the world's murder capital. Then, one city government after another built schools and libraries, parks and infrastructure. The police also received an overhaul and became more adept at going after violent trafficking groups.

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9:41 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Michigan House committee approves Medicaid expansion bill

Lead in text: 
House could vote on bill this week, Senate next week
LANSING - A proposal to expand Medicaid under federal health care law has cleared its first hurdle in the Republican-led Michigan Legislature. The House's Michigan Competitiveness Committee advanced House Bill 4714 on Wednesday by a 9-5 vote - sending the measure to the House floor. Republicans were divided while Democrats generally supported the proposal.
9:26 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Post to invest $30-million in Battle Creek facility, create 92 jobs

Lead in text: 
15 leadership positions will also be relocated from Modesto, California to Battle Creek
Nearly 100 hundred jobs will be created in Battle Creek as Post Foods plans to invest $30 million into its facility on Cliff Street, the company announced today. Some key leadership roles will also relocate to Battle Creek as the company closes a facility in Modesto, Calif.
All Tech Considered
6:27 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Net Giants Try To Quell Users' Jitters About Their Data

Google, like Facebook, Microsoft and other Internet companies, is concerned that data requests from U.S. surveillance agencies could ultimately damage its reputation in the U.S. and overseas.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 7:00 pm

Companies like Google and Facebook are very much caught in the middle of the current debate about national security and privacy. Press reports have said the companies are required to turn over huge amounts of customer data to government agencies like the National Security Agency, but the companies are often barred from saying anything publicly about the requests they receive.

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The Salt
5:48 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

As Drought Turns To Flood, Farmers Get 'Weather Whiplash'

A central Illinois farmer plants corn seed into the evening in Farmingdale, Ill.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:20 pm

As Chris Webber checked the 40 acres of muddy field he wanted to plant on a recent morning, he worried about getting more rain, even as he worried about the lack of it.

"The drought is over at the moment," he says. "But in Missouri, we tend to say that in 10 days or two weeks, we can be in a drought again. That's how fast it can get back to dry."

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Sports
5:33 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Hockey's Hottest Teams Hit The Ice In Stanley Cup Final

An oversized Chicago Blackhawks hockey helmet sits on one of the lion sculptures outside the entrance to the Art Institute of Chicago in celebration of the team's upcoming appearance in the Stanley Cup Final in Chicago. The Blackhawks host the Boston Bruins in Game 1 on Wednesday.
Scott Eisen AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 7:03 pm

The National Hockey League's Stanley Cup championship gets underway in Chicago Wednesday night, with the Chicago Blackhawks and the Boston Bruins facing off in the first game of the best-of-seven series. It's a classic matchup between two of the NHL's original six teams.

Both teams are recent champs, which is helping passionate hockey fans and players put the bitter labor dispute that almost iced the season behind them.

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The Summer of '63
5:03 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Bob Dylan's Tribute To Medgar Evers Took On The Big Picture

Bob Dylan performs at the Newport Folk Festival in 1963. His set included "Only a Pawn in Their Game," which he would also play at the 1963 March on Washington.
Eyeneer

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:20 pm

On this day 50 years ago — June 12, 1963 — Bob Dylan's career was just taking off when he heard the news that civil rights activist Medgar Evers had been assassinated. Dylan responded with a song that he eventually performed at the March on Washington and the Newport Folk Festival.

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Shots - Health News
4:56 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

In Arizona, An Unlikely Ally For Medicaid Expansion

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, points during an intense conversation with President Obama after he arrived at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport in Mesa, Ariz. She has since made light of the incident in trying to rally support for a Medicaid expansion in the state.
Haraz N. Ghanbari AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:20 pm

The Arizona Legislature is debating whether to extend Medicaid to about 300,000 people in the state. The expansion is a requirement to get federal funding under the Affordable Care Act.

The big surprise is who has been leading the charge: Republican Gov. Jan Brewer. She's one of President Obama's staunchest critics and has confounded conservatives in her own party by supporting the expansion.

Google the words "Brewer" and "Obama." You'll get a now-famous image of Brewer wagging her finger at the president on the tarmac last year when she met him in Phoenix.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:52 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

A Loaded Bible Story, Tweaked For The Opera Stage

Nathan Gunn and Sasha Cooke star in the new opera The Gospel of Mary Magdalene as Yeshua (the Hebrew name of Jesus) and the title character.
San Francisco Opera

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:20 pm

Composer Mark Adamo has made beautiful music out of classic books. His Little Women is among the most produced American operas today. He also wrote the words and music for his operatic adaptation of Aristophanes' Greek drama Lysistrata.

His latest work, The Gospel of Mary Magdalene, has proved more controversial. The opera, which premieres June 19 at the San Francisco Opera, tells the story of Mary, Jesus and his disciples.

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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Protesters Back In Taksim Square After Being Driven Out

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

In Istanbul, crowds of protesters are once again gathering at Taksim Square, after being driven out last night by riot police.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING PROTESTERS)

BLOCK: Everywhere is Taksim, they chanted today, everywhere is resistance.

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NPR Story
4:20 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

AAA Study Finds Hands-Free Tech Dangerously Distracting

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 6:20 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The connected car promises voice-activated systems that let drivers dictate emails and texts, make a dinner reservation or update their Facebook page, all while behind the wheel. Some cars already have these options. Many more are on the way. Carmakers say it's safer than fiddling around with a smartphone.

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Music Interviews
4:16 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

The National: 'We've Earned Our Stripes'

The National's new album is titled Trouble Will Find Me.
Deirdre O'Callaghan Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 4:16 pm

When a band called The National made its debut more than a decade ago, it was considered an underdog in a busy independent music scene. The lead singer's melancholy baritone and the lush instrumentation didn't always fit the irony-laden swagger of the aughts. The National has endured, and these days it has a hard-won following. It headlines big concert halls and late-night talk shows.

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SW Michigan
3:29 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

KVCC part-time faculty drop labor complaint

KVCC Texas Township campus
Credit WMUK

The union representing part-time instructors at Kalamazoo Valley Community College says it is dropping an unfair labor practice complaint against the school. The KVCC Federation of Teachers says it's signed an agreement with the college to prevent job losses.

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Station News
2:37 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

More News on WMUK-2

  As you may have heard, NPR has made the difficult decision to wind down production of Talk of the Nation at the end of June.  In its place, NPR and WBUR in Boston are joining forces to expand and re-launch WBUR’s daily show Here & Now as a national news program for audiences in the middle of the day. It will be the first program owned and produced by a Member station that is built on a close, day-to-day editorial collaboration with NPR.

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Politics
2:11 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

The Legacy Of Watergate And The Semantics Of Scandals

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 2:34 pm

Forty years after the Senate committee hearings on the Watergate scandal, Political Junkie Ken Rudin talks with Lowell Weicker, who served on the Senate Watergate committee. Former White House speechwriters Paul Glastris and Peter Robinson talk about writing speeches amid scandal.

Health
1:59 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Fighting To Breathe: Living With COPD

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 2:21 pm

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that slowly robs sufferers of the ability to breathe. COPD is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., surpassed only by cancer and heart disease. There are treatments, but no cure for the disease.

Medical Treatments
1:59 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Life Resumes: Looking Ahead With Suleika Jaouad

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:43 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

You may know Suleika Jaouad from Life, Interrupted, the pieces she writes on her cancer on The New York Times Well blog. She's also made time to speak with us over the past year starting last May, about a month after she received a bone marrow transplant. During that conversation, she told us: I feel very hopeful for the future, but I have definitely been humbled by everything I've been through. I don't think of myself as invincible or immortal anymore.

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WMUK News
1:41 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

WMU Midwest Games a touch of home for Malaysian students

Midwest Games opening ceremony at WMU's Kanley Track
Credit Mike Lanka / WMU University Relations

Western Michigan University hosted the Malaysian Midwest Games over the Memorial Day weekend. The event featured a broad range of Olympic-style athletic competitions for students from Malaysia studying at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada.

If you stood in the right spot inside Western’s Student Recreation Center during the games you would have seen Malaysian students competing in table tennis, basketball and netball, all at the same time. They were just three of the sports featured in what participants call simply the “Midwest Games”.

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Music Reviews
1:35 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Fame Studios And The Road To Nashville Songwriting Glory

Fame Studio

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:57 am

Wallace Daniel Pennington grew up singing. His father played guitar and his mother played piano, and by the age of 9, the young man had a guitar of his own. The family attended church on Sunday and Wednesday each week, and to this day, Dan Penn says he remembers the entire Methodist congregation belting out hymns.

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Movie Interviews
1:28 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

'20 Feet From' The Spotlight, There's Singing Worthy Of One

Singer Merry Clayton performs in Hollywood during a celebration of Carole King and her music.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 2:31 pm

The documentary 20 Feet From Stardom, which explores the world of rock 'n' roll's backup singers, opens to the soundtrack of Lou Reed's "Walk on the Wild Side." Reed sings half the refrain — "And the colored girls go, doo do doo do doo" — until a chorus of backup singers pick up the "Do doo" line. At first these women sound far away, but as the chorus progresses, their voices get louder, less produced and polished, more real and intimate.

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WMU tuition
1:26 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

WMU board approves tuition increase of 3.57% for fall

Credit WMUK
  • Western Michigan University President John Dunn on tuition
  • WMU President John Dunn and Vice President for Business and Finance Jan Van Der Kley on the university budget

Western Michigan University students will pay higher tuition rates this fall. 

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Can I Just Tell You?
12:00 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Want To Know Something? Just Ask

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Art & Design
11:42 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Designer Ozwald Boateng On Being The 'Statesman of Cool'

Oswald Boateng has designed for the rich and famous.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:49 pm

Ozwald Boateng was the youngest and first black tailor to have a shop on London's prestigious Savile Row, a street renowned for its fine tailoring, where the world's royalty come for their attire.

Boateng also dresses athletic and Hollywood royalty. Actor Laurence Fishburne once said, "When you wear an Ozwald Boateng suit, you become a statesman of cool." Boateng is also a statesman for something else: the future development of Africa.

He joined Tell Me More host Michel Martin to talk about style and diplomacy.

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