All Tech Considered
2:46 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

The End Of Buttons: The New Gesture-Control Era

BlackBerry smartphones on a table during a "BlackBerry Brunch" in June in Berlin.
Timur Emek Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:58 pm

Read more
Author Interviews
2:02 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

'Lawrence' Of Arabia: From Archaeologist To War Hero

T.E. Lawrence, shown here on Oct. 3, 1928, wore Arab clothing in an effort to be seen as trustworthy.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:52 pm

One of the most intriguing figures of 20th-century warfare is T.E. Lawrence, the British army officer who immersed himself in the culture of the Arabian Peninsula's Bedouin tribes and played a key role in the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Turks during World War I. He became a well-known and romanticized figure in post-war England, and was immortalized in the 1962 film Lawrence of Arabia.

Read more
Media
12:31 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

First Look At New Al-Jazeera America Network

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 10:14 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, Michel Martin is away. Coming up, the images of the Civil Rights Movement have been captured in photographs, and in a moment - minutes, we'll hear from artist Faith Ringgold about telling that history through paintings. But first, we turn to a new phase in broadcast television. The cable TV channel Al Jazeera America launches tomorrow.

Read more
Arts & Life
12:31 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Faith Ringgold: No 'Knock Down, Drag Out Black Woman Story'

The legendary artist began her career in 1963, the same year as the March on Washington. She talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about her life, work, and why no one originally wanted to hear her story.

Remembrances
12:31 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Honoring Executive Producer Teshima Walker

Teshima Walker 2010
Doby Photography NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:18 pm

Teshima Walker Izrael was the executive producer of Tell Me More. She came to the end of a long battle with cancer on Friday at the age of 44. Tributes and tweets are coming in from all over the country with #TeamTeshima.

Tell Me More thought it would be fitting to hear her voice on the air again, sharing one of the many stories she reported over the years. In 2005, she and producer Nicole Child went to Montgomery, Ala., and toured the Cleveland Court Apartments where Rosa Parks and her husband lived. We air an excerpt from that story.

Read more
11:49 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Michigan schools to be color-coded

Lead in text: 
Some school officials say they're worried that the new system might actually cause more confusion about how well schools are doing.
The new Michigan School Accountability Scorecards is what state officials hope is a more intuitive, color-coded system that will assign one of five colors - green, lime green, yellow, orange or red - to each school or district. The color green is best, and it means most of the goals were met.
11:43 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Federal voting oversight may end in Michigan

Lead in text: 
Detroit Congressman John Conyers says he expects Clyde Township in Allegan County to be among those removed from the oversight list. It wound up there in the 1970's because of a large, Spanish-speaking population.
Buena Vista Township- The U.S. Supreme Court sparked controversy in June when it struck down a portion of the Voting Rights Act, meaning nine states - mostly from the South - no longer would need to get approval from the federal government to make changes in voting laws.
Arts & More
10:36 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Diving into Great Lakes shipwreck history

The cover of "Lost on the Lady Elgin" by Valerie van Heest
Credit Valerie van Heest

The bottom of the Great Lakes is like an open history book to diver and shipwreck explorer Valerie van Heest of Holland, Michigan. She’ll talk about her explorations during a presentation sponsored by the Vicksburg Historical Society. It starts Tuesday, August 20th, at 7 p.m. in the Vicksburg Community Center at the corner of Main and Prairie.

Read more
WMUK News
9:35 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Challenges face LGBT elders and youth

Still from the documentary "Gen Silent"
Credit MAD STU Media, LLC

Most people face challenges as they reach their retirement years. But those who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender face special problems. Two non-profit agencies in Kalamazoo County have developed a new resource guide to help LGBT elders navigate those issues. Kalamazoo Gay Lesbian Resource Center Executive Director Zach Bauer says it created the guide in cooperation with the Area Agency on Aging.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Redheads Flock To Portland For World Record Attempt

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 2:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Redheads usually stand out in a crowd, though not at the Portland Redhead Event. More than 1,300 gathered in Portland, Ore., over the weekend - which it hopes is a new world record.

To qualify, participants had to produce pictures of their younger selves and their naturally red hair. If confirmed, this would be Portland's third record this summer. The others? The largest gathering of people hugging trees and the longest floating human chain.

Around the Nation
6:52 am
Mon August 19, 2013

What Do You Do When Your Cable TV Goes Out?

Here's one thing not to do: call 911. Police in Fairfield, Conn., had to remind residents Sunday night that a cable drop-out is not "an emergency or a police-related concern." They added that misusing the 911 system can result in arrest.

NPR Story
4:34 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Consider Wedding Insurance To Get Hitched Without A Hitch

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:52 am

The average cost of an American wedding cost more than $28,000 last year. Travelers insurance is now offering wedding insurance. There's coverage for failed wedding pictures, the caterer goes out of business, gifts go missing, etc.

NPR Story
4:34 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Democrats And Republicans Push Obama To Get Tough With Egypt

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

After a weeklong vacation, President Obama is back at the White House, though not for long. He's getting ready for a bus tour later in the week to promote his policies on the economy and education. The president is also dealing with demands from both political parties that he get tougher with the Egyptian military, as violence rages in Egypt.

Read more
NPR Story
4:34 am
Mon August 19, 2013

U.S. Family Of Ill Prisoner Wants North Korea To Release Him

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:28 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Hitting The Road Without A Driver

Carnegie Mellon's autonomous car, developed with General Motors, is by all appearances a normal Cadillac SRX crossover β€” except for the big red button in the middle of the dashboard. In an emergency, the button allows the car to be switched immediately back to standard driving mode.
GM-Carnegie Mellon Autonomous Driving Collaborative Research Lab

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 2:19 pm

The cars we drive have gotten ever more sophisticated. They can just about park themselves; they tell us if we're drifting out of our lane; they can prevent skids. Some even automatically apply the brakes if they sense that a collision is imminent.

Engineers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh are developing a car that can do all of those things and more β€” it can actually drive itself. Imagine that commute to work.

Read more
Books
3:07 am
Mon August 19, 2013

For You To Borrow, Some Libraries Have To Go Begging

The Tyson Library in Ludlow, Vt., is required to support itself independently; public libraries in Vermont receive no state funding.
Neda Ulaby NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:14 pm

More than 90 percent of Americans say public libraries are important to their communities, according to the Pew Research Center. But the way that love translates into actual financial support varies hugely from state to state.

Vermont, for instance, brags that it has more libraries per capita than any other U.S. state. Some of them are remarkably quaint. In Ludlow, one library is a white clapboard Victorian, slightly frayed, ringed by lilies and sitting by the side of a brook.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:06 am
Mon August 19, 2013

You Ask, We Answer: More Of Your Questions About The Affordable Care Act

From left, Garrett Berntsen, Jennifer Majer and William Shields compare notes at The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. Twenty-somethings have new choices under Obamacare.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 11:06 am

The Oct. 1 launch of the new health insurance exchanges is now less than two months away, and people are starting to pay attention to the changes these new marketplaces may bring to the nation's health care system.

Read more
Code Switch
3:05 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Not Just A 'Black Thing': An Asian-American's Bond With Malcolm X

Kochiyama looks at a memorial for World War II Japanese-American internees at the Rohwer Relocation Center in Rohwer, Ark., in 2004.
Mike Wintroath AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:22 am

The brief friendship of Malcolm X and Yuri Kochiyama began close to 50 years ago with a handshake.

Diane Fujino, chairwoman of the Asian-American studies department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, details the moment in her biography Heartbeat of Struggle: The Revolutionary Life of Yuri Kochiyama.

Kochiyama and her eldest son, 16-year-old Billy, were arrested along with hundreds of other people, mainly African-Americans, during a protest in Brooklyn, N.Y., in October 1963.

Read more
Parallels
3:04 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Sun, Sand And The Seine: The Beach Comes To Paris

People enjoy the sun next to Pont Neuf bridge as "Paris Plage, or Paris Beach, opens along the banks of the Seine river in Paris, on July 20. The annual free event brings a half-mile of beach into the heart of the French capital.
Christian Hartmann Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:48 pm

It's a hot day in Paris and kids run in and out of giant sprinklers set up on the banks of the Seine river not far from Notre Dame cathedral at a place called Paris Beach, or Paris Plage.

Among the wet, excited children are the Obadjia sisters β€” 4-year-old Judith and 7-year-old Eve. The girls say they come to this magic place every year with their mother and brother, crossing town in a bus to get here.

"I love Paris Plage because we can watch the boats go by," says Judith.

"And when it's hot we can cool off here in the sprinklers," adds big sister Eve.

Read more
Afghanistan
3:03 am
Mon August 19, 2013

In Kabul, A Juggling Act That Offers Joy For Afghan Kids

Students at the Afghan Mobile Mini Circus for Children participate in the juggling parade on the streets of Kabul before Afghanistan's eighth annual national juggling championship last week.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:52 am

Morning traffic in Kabul can be punishing enough as it is. But on a recent day, there's an extra element clogging up the streets, a scene you don't see on a typical day in the Afghan capital.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:29 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Has Voyager 1 Left The Solar System?

This artist rendering provided by NASA shows Voyager 1 at the edge of the solar system.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 2:52 pm

The Voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977 on a mission to Jupiter and Saturn. It kept on going. Today it's billions of miles from Earth, and scientists have been predicting it will soon leave the solar system.

NPR has been on Voyager watch since at least 2003, when longtime science correspondent Richard Harris provided this warning of Voyager's impending departure.

Read more
Animals
12:21 am
Mon August 19, 2013

Wild Horses Run Free As Adoption Centers Fill Up

Katrina Boydon and her mustang Spirit. She adopted the horse as an orphaned foal with a rattlesnake bite on his hoof.
Will Stone KUNR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:52 am

Drive about 20 miles north of Reno, Nev., into the barren scrubland and you're sure to see "wild" horses β€” more than 1,000, in fact. Just not in the wild.

Laura Leigh calls several mares to the edge of the dusty corral. She's a regular at Palomino Valley National Adoption Center. The horses eagerly rub their muzzles against her, their coats hot from the midday sun.

"We got to get you a home, don't we?" she says to one of the horses. "This one will let you scratch her withers and put your hands on her legs. You're adorable, aren't you?"

Read more
7:53 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Holland's mayor considers U.S. Senate bid

Lead in text: 
Dykstra says he'll make a final decision about joining the GOP primary race "soon".
With the announcement of U.S. Rep. Dave Camp withdrawing from a possible U.S. Senate run, Holland Mayor Kurt Dykstra announced in a statement today he will open up again his exploration into running for the seat. Long-time Michigan Sen. Carl Levin announced early this year he would not seek re-election to the seat he's held since 1979.
Music
5:23 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

A Year After Its Debut, The Song 'Cups' Becomes A Hit

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CUPS GAME)

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Does that sound familiar? You may recognize "Cups" as a rhythmic game from your childhood or from the song "Cups" which is on Billboard's hot 100 as the number six song in the country right now.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CUPS")

ANNA KENDRICK: (Singing) When I'm gone. When I'm gone. You're gonna miss me when I'm gone.

GONYEA: That's Anna Kendrick in a version of the song from the movie "Pitch Perfect," which came out last year. Since then, it's blown up. Why is it so popular all of a sudden?

Read more
Author Interviews
5:23 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

A Dystopian View Of America's 'Fallen' Suburbs

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:03 pm

The suburbs can be a creepy place. And they are at their creepiest in Patrick Flanery's new novel, Fallen Land. Set outside an unnamed American city, this dark and complex thriller plays out in a half-built subdivision where construction ground to a halt during the housing crisis.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:23 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?

Classic cars of all makes and models drive the 16-mile stretch along Woodward Avenue during the annual Dream Cruise in 2009 in Ferndale, Mich. During the annual event, the glory days of car culture return, if only for a day.
Jerry S. Mendoza AP

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 5:29 pm

Almost as soon as they started rolling off the assembly lines, automobiles became synonymous with freedom. And in the post-World War II boom our relationship with cars intensified.

It was about horsepower, status, being American, and for young people: rebellion. For generations cars inspired countless songs, books and movies. But now there are signs that our car culture is losing some of its shine.

Read more

Petra Mayer is an associate editor and resident nerd at NPR Books, focusing on genre fiction. She brings to the job passion, speed-reading skills, and a truly impressive collection of Doctor Who doodads.

Previously, she was an associate producer and director for the weekend editions of All Things Considered. She handled all of the show's books coverage, and she was also the person to ask if you wanted to know how much snow falls outside NPR's Washington headquarters on a Saturday, how to belly dance, or what pro wrestling looks like up close and personal.

Books News & Features
2:22 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Fans Are Like Friends To 'Reigning Queen' Of Women's Fiction

Debbie Macomber's latest book is Rose Harbor in Bloom.
Deborah Feingold

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:12 pm

Go to your nearest paperback rack, and odds are, you'll see two or three, or four, or β€” well, a lot of books by Debbie Macomber, an author The Sacramento Bee has dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

Macomber has 170 million books in print; the newest, Rose Harbor in Bloom, has just been released. Her publisher, Random House, celebrated Macomber's selling power earlier this month with a fan retreat at the Gaylord Opryland resort in Nashville, where 400 women gathered for a weekend of tea, knitting and literary friendship.

Read more
12:08 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Michigan benefits from "sin taxes"

Lead in text: 
The report says Michigan gets 3.6 percent of all of its revenue from taxes on alcohol, tobacco, and gambling.
In 2011, state governments collected more than $50 billion in taxes and proceeds from vice: gambling, smoking and alcohol consumption. Some argue that state governments should not profit from residents' vices. However, some states rely on these activities for a substantial proportion of their budget.
11:57 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Bike rentals offered in downtown Battle Creek

Lead in text: 
The Battle Creek Community Foundation and bike shop TeamActive are sponsoring the project.
Starting next week, Battle Creek will offer bicycle rentals to anybody. All that's needed is a credit card and a working pair of legs. In front of Burnham Brook Community Center at 200 W. Michigan Ave. is a B-cycle station. Four bikes and one adult-sized tricycle can be rented by anyone in the community.

Pages