Movie Interviews
11:46 am
Fri August 9, 2013

'The Butler': 'It's Not A Movie — It's A Movement'

Forest Whitaker stars in The Butler, loosely based on the life of Eugene Allen.
Anne Marie Fox The Weinsten Co.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 7:03 pm

Lee Daniels has directed critically acclaimed films that deal with difficult subject matter before, but he says working on The Butler was "the hardest thing he's ever done."

The film chronicles the life of a man who rose from the cotton fields of North Carolina to work in the White House, witnessing some of the most important moments in this nation's history.

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Music News
10:59 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Remembering The People's Throat Singer Of Tuva

Kongar-Ol Ondar at the 72nd Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles. Genghis Blues was nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary Short.
Scott Nelson Getty Images.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:57 am

The technique known as throat singing is an ancient style still practiced in Tuva, a small republic between Siberia and Mongolia's Gobi desert. Traditionally, it was practiced by herders.

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Business
10:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

UBS To Pay $120 Million In Lehman Brothers Dispute

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more fallout from the financial crisis.

Swiss banking giant UBS has agreed to pay $120 million to settle a lawsuit by investors. The case goes back to 2007. Investors say they were misled about the health of the financial firm Lehmann Brothers when UBS was selling them investments linked to Lehmann's debt. Lehmann collapsed into bankruptcy in September 2008. The settlement resolves claims of about $1 billion. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:14 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Covert braces for possible closing of school district

Lead in text: 
School board will meet Monday to determine whether district can secure $2.5-million loan from state
COVERT - News that the financially strapped Covert school system may close its doors this fall has hit this community hard.
6:51 am
Fri August 9, 2013

South Haven beaches closed due to high e.coli levels

Lead in text: 
Van Buren County officials are advising people to avoid body contact with water at bathing beach areas on Lake Michigan
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
SOUTH HAVEN - North and South Beaches in South Haven have been shut down due to high E. coli levels, caused by heavy rains in the past few days. The results from a beach monitoring event on Wednesday.
Around the Nation
6:47 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Michigan Family Welcomes 12th Child

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer, with an announcement. Michiganders Jay and Teri Schwandt just had their 12th child, and it's a boy, just like his 11 brothers. Little Tucker was nine days late, so they thought he might be a girl - not happening.

Must be a family thing. Teri's sister has 10 children, and they are all boys. Will they try again for lucky 13? We will never close that door, says Teri.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:47 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Kansas City Sandwich Is A 'Hit' With Baseball Teams

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Oklahoma Joe's barbecue is a popular spot in Kansas City - especially known for its Z-Man sandwich - smoked brisket with provolone topped with onion rings. The Minnesota Twins must've gotten the memo. They ordered 50 Z-Mans on Tuesday, and went on to beat the hometown Royals in a blowout.

6:46 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Kalamazoo County Probate Judge Donald Halstead to retire

Lead in text: 
Governor Rick Snyder will appoint someone to fill the remaining 16 months of Halstead's current term
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Kalamazoo County Probate Judge Donald R. Halstead has retired after serving the county for 32 years. The official date of his retirement was Monday, July 15. Reached for comment Thursday, Halstead said he decided earlier this year to retire so he can spend more time with his family.
6:21 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Enbridge asks EPA for extension of Kalamazoo River clean up

Lead in text: 
Enbridge wants deadline extended beyond end of this year
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
COMSTOCK TOWNSHIP, MI - Enbridge, Inc. has asked the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency for an extension to complete dredging of the Kalamazoo River due to continued opposition of two chosen dredge pad sites surrounding Morrow Lake.
6:16 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Detroit bankruptcy delays municipal bond sales

Lead in text: 
Battle Creek is among the municipalities that have delayed issuing bonds
A third Michigan local government has postponed a bond sale, amid concerns Detroit's bankruptcy filing will change the rules of the municipal bond game and make it more expensive for communities to borrow money. Saginaw County, with 198,353 residents in mid-Michigan, delayed a $60.5 million pension bond sale on Thursday because investors were seeking higher interest rates.
Digital Life
5:22 am
Fri August 9, 2013

New Digital Amber Alerts Could Create A Backlash

Amber Alerts were issued as cellphone text messages in California this week.
NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 1:20 pm

A couple of nights ago I had just closed my book, turned off my light, and was drifting off to sleep when my cellphone started to shriek. I shot awake and groped for the phone. My sleep-befuddled brain was greeted with this message: "Boulevard, CA Amber Alert update." Then there was a license plate number, and a make and model of the car.

Groggily, I Google this town — Boulevard, Calif. — and discovered it was 541 miles away from my house. That's more than the distance between Washington, D.C., and Detroit. I was mystified. Why was I getting this?

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Lawlessness Increases In Libya

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And just preserving some semblance of order is the big challenge in neighboring Libya. That country's long-time dictator, Muammar Gaddafi was toppled from power two years ago and now the future of Libya as even a functioning state is in question. There has been increased lawlessness in that country. The militias that ousted Muammar Gaddafi are fighting with each other. A thousand inmates escaped in a prison break and there are assassinations of activists and police.

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Feds Probe If Student Athletes Were Biogenesis Clients

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Major League baseball, this week, sanctioned a number of players, including New York Yankee Alex Rodriguez. They're accused of receiving performance enhancing drugs from a Miami clinic called Biogenesis.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And according to ESPN and other organizations, that clinic also saw high school athletes. Parents have told the sports network they don't know why their children were listed in the clinics records. The lawyer for the owner of Biogenesis declined to comment to ESPN and has not returned calls from NPR.

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NPR Story
4:50 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Astronaut Among Presidential Medal Of Freedom Winners

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Astronaut Sally Ride has served as a role model for many young women as the first American woman in space. That's one of the reasons why she's one of the 16 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Ride is being honored posthumously - she died last year at the age of 61. The White House in a statement said: Sally Ride stood up for racial and gender equality in the classroom and taught students that there are no limits to what they can accomplish.

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Parallels
3:08 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Unease In Sprawling Rio Slum Ahead Of Police 'Pacification'

A police officer patrols the rooftop of a school at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sept. 20, 2012, where a "pacification" anti-crime effort was underway. Rio police are now going to attempt a similar pacification in another huge slum, Mare.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Brazilian police are preparing to occupy one of the deadliest shantytown complexes in Rio de Janeiro, hoping to drive out drug gangs ahead of next year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

It's the latest "pacification" effort in a Rio slum, and the city's new chief of police says he'll need some 1,500 cops to secure this one, called Mare.

Police in the past would typically stage raids, but then withdraw from the dangerous shantytowns, known here as favelas. But under the pacification program, they now set up shop inside the favelas.

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Planet Money
3:07 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Tourre Juror: 'We Saw Goldman As The Bigger Problem'

Fabrice Tourre, outside the courtroom. "We didn't feel any malice toward him," one of the jurors said.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

Beth Glover was a juror on the trial of former Goldman Sachs trader Fabrice Tourre. When the lawyers were discussing the mortgages tied to the securities at the center of the case, Glover realized that, for all intents and purposes, they were talking about her mortgage.

"When they were looking at the subprime mortgage groupings, I think I would have been in one of those," Glover told me. "I didn't have as great as FICO score at that time."

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The Salt
3:05 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Old Hawaiian Menus Tell Story Of Local Fish And Their Demise

Colorful covers of menus from the Royal Hawaiian Hotel (left) and the Monarch Room Royal Hawaiian Hotel.
New York Public Library

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:53 pm

In the early to mid-1900s, the islands of Hawaii were a far-away, exotic destination. People who managed to get there often kept mementos of that journey including kitschy menus from Hawaiian fine dining restaurants and hotels like like Trader Vic's and Prince Kuhio's.

Now these old menus are serving a purpose beyond colorful relics from the past. Kyle Van Houtan, an ecologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, says he's found a scientific purpose for the menus.

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StoryCorps
1:17 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Surviving Tragedy: 'It Brought Us Closer'

Ondelee at home before his prom. In Chicago, prom night is a big deal. Fifty percent of African-American Chicago high school students end up dropping out of high school before senior year. Ondelee graduated from Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago on June 15, and is planning to attend college.
Carlos Javier Ortiz Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:06 pm

One night in 2009, Ondelee Perteet and a friend went to a party in his hometown of Chicago.

"A lot of people, they started throwing gang signs. And, you know, I got into an argument with somebody in the party, and that's when I got shot in the face," Ondelee said during a recent visit to StoryCorps with his mother, Detreena.

He was 14.

"I got to the hospital, and the doctor came back, and he said, 'We're sorry, but he's never going to move his arms and legs again,' " said Detreena, 47. "It just tore me apart."

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Shots - Health News
7:04 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Test

A red blood cell infected with malaria parasites (blue) sits next to normal cells (red).
NIAID Flickr.com

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:02 am

A viable, effective vaccine against malaria has long eluded scientists. Results from a preliminary study have ignited hope that a new type of vaccine could change that.

The experimental vaccine offered strong protection against malaria when given at high doses, scientists report Thursday in the journal Science.

The study was extremely small and short-term. And the candidate vaccine still has a long way to go before it could be used in the developing world.

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Politics
5:28 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Can Congress Figure Out How To Rescue The Post Office?

U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Jamesa Euler delivers mail in the rain in Atlanta in February.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

The U.S. Postal Service lost some $16 billion last year and continues to bleed red ink. Congress has been unable to agree on a rescue plan.

The latest proposal would allow the post office to end Saturday delivery in a year and enable it to ship wine and beer.

The Postal Service's woes are familiar: People don't really send letters anymore, so first-class mail is down, and Congress makes the post office prepay future retiree benefits to the tune of $5.5 billion a year.

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Energy
5:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Fukushima Nuclear Plant Leaking 300 Tons Of Tainted Water Daily

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Television
5:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Why Hasn't The Internet Blown Up Cable TV's Business Model?

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Since Friday, CBS has been off the air for millions of Time Warner Cable customers. The two sides are fighting over how much Time Warner pays to carry CBS. Then a remarkable thing happened. Time Warner offered to unbundle the TV network, meaning only customers who want it would pay for it. That's close to blasphemy in the cable business and CBS quickly shot down the idea.

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Education
5:20 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Common Core Curriculum Brings Big Shifts To Math Instruction

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

To big changes now in the classroom. Most states have adopted new math and literacy guidelines for students from kindergarten through 12th grade. They're called the Common Core standards, and they rewrite the rules of what students should know grade by grade. When it comes to math, not only are the standards changing, some of the work kids will be doing and bringing home will actually look different.

To explain, here's NPR's Cory Turner.

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Asia
4:48 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

As Myanmar Opens Up, A Look Back On A 1988 Uprising

Democracy demonstrators wave the Burmese flag in August 1988, when millions of Burmese took to the streets. Students led the protests, but were soon joined by civil servants, police, soldiers and ordinary citizens.
Courtesy of Gaye Paterson

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 2:21 pm

Until two years ago, Myanmar, also known as Burma, was ruled by the longest-running military dictatorship in the world. In 2010, the military began to loosen its grip on the country, increasing civil freedoms and offering some political and economic opportunity for citizens.

But some are wondering whether the country can truly transition to democracy if it fails to reconcile with its brutal past.

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
4:03 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

'Dork Diaries' Reveal Secrets Of 'Not-So-Fabulous' Teen Life

Aladdin

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 7:13 pm

This month, NPR's Backseat Book Club goes snooping in Nikki Maxwell's "private and confidential" Dork Diaries. But the secret's already gotten out; the series launched four years ago, and there are already 12 million books in print in 34 different languages. The sixth in the series — Tales From a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker — was just published in June.

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Found Recipes
3:51 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Don't Let The Price Of Pine Nuts Keep You From Pesto

Julia della Croce says pistachio pesto is an economical — and delicious — alternative when Italian pine nuts can cost up to $120 per pound.
Nathan Hoyt Courtesy of Julia della Croce

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:10 pm

Basil is growing thick and leafy in many backyard gardens throughout the U.S. right now, which means many people are thinking about pesto. It's one of the more basic sauces you can make — in addition to basil, all you need is Parmesan or Romano cheese, a little garlic, some extra virgin olive oil and Italian pine nuts.

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Parallels
3:38 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Egypt's Top General And His U.S. Lessons In Democracy

Downtown Cairo is plastered with huge posters of Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, the U.S.-trained Egyptian army chief who helped overthrow President Mohammed Morsi.
Amr Abdallah Dalsh Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 6:56 pm

Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, the man at the center of the military takeover in Egypt, is the latest in a series of American-trained foreign officers to oust a civilian government.

Just seven years ago, he was a student at the Army War College in rural Pennsylvania. At a recent military graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Egypt, el-Sissi talked about his ouster of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi on July 3.

The army was forced to take that step, the general said, in the wake of mass protests against the elected government.

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2:56 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Federal judge says no new trial for Kilpatrick

Lead in text: 
The former Detroit mayor's father was also convicted of a tax offense in the case.
A federal judge has refused to acquit or grant new trials to former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, his father and a city contractor. The decision Thursday clears the way for Kilpatrick's sentence for corruption on Sept. 3. Kilpatrick and Bobby Ferguson were convicted in March of a sweeping scheme to enrich themselves through fixed contracts, bribes and kickbacks.
Wisdom Watch
2:18 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Spike Lee: Doing The Right Thing For Himself

Legendary filmmaker Spike Lee is using the website Kickstarter to raise money for his latest project.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 3:59 pm

Spike Lee is known for film classics like Do the Right Thing, She's Gotta Have It and Jungle Fever. Now, he's taking the funding of his next movie — currently known only as The Newest Hottest Spike Lee Joint — to the crowd, using Kickstarter.

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2:17 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

School tax dispute continues in Covert

Lead in text: 
The company that owns the power plant in question says it has paid what it owes as determined by the state. But local officials beg to differ.
As local officials seek a financial lifeline for Covert Public Schools, they say the law is on their side in demanding that New Covert Generating Co. pay about $7 million in back taxes now, despite a Michigan Tax Tribunal ruling that would actually give the company a tax refund.

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