Music Reviews
12:39 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Valerie June Wants To Be On Your Mind

Valerie June.
Susan Riddle Duke Photography Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 1:32 pm

Valerie June wants to be on your mind; to get inside your head. She writes or co-writes songs that mix blues, gospel, folk and soul, and which describe emotional isolation, financial deprivation and insecurity about her place in the world. She's unafraid to proclaim her neediness — perhaps because, possessed of a powerful voice, she knows that her vulnerability isn't likely to come off as passive or self-pitying on Pushin' Against a Stone.

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12:22 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Yucca Mountain nuke waste study back on

Lead in text: 
The site in Nevada could become the destination for highly rasioactive spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors like the one at Palisades near South Haven.
The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals said today that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission must resume its long-slumbering review of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste storage project, which the Obama administration and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid have labored for years to kill. “[U]nless and until Congress authoritatively says otherwise or there...
Rep. Jase Bolger
8:49 am
Tue August 13, 2013

WestSouthwest: State House Speaker Jase Bolger

Jase Bolger
Credit WMUK

State House Speaker Jase Bolger sat down just days after an Ingham County Judge found no evidence of criminal activity related to a party-switch last year. 

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Around the Nation
7:35 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Ohio Casino Acknowledges Mistake, Awards 2 Winners

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Our next millionaire is Kevin Lewis. That's what Kevin Lewis of Cincinnati, Ohio heard last Saturday night while visiting the Horseshoe Casino in Cleveland. He'd won a $1 million giveaway. He was shocked. He was thrilled.

And he was the wrong Kevin Lewis from Cincinnati, something casino officials only realized as he was accepting his prize. It was our blunder, they said, so both Kevin Lewises get to keep their $1 million prizes. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:19 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Atlanta Braves Find Another Use For Duct Tape

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

The baseball helmet is meant to protect players. But it's increasingly becoming a problem for Atlanta Braves third baseman Chris Johnson. For the second time in two seasons, Johnson was ejected from a game after arguing with an umpire and throwing his helmet. Next game, Johnson hit the field with a new piece of equipment: duct tape over his mouth. The Braves need Johnson in the game. He's leading the league in batting and so the team hopes this new strategy sticks.

6:56 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Harper Schools approves virtual program designed to help kids who "miss out" on diploma

Lead in text: 
30 to 40 students are expected to use the program over the coming year
Harper Creek Community Schools on Monday approved a new virtual program meant to capture kids who "disappear" and miss out on a high school diploma. The Harper Board of Education voted 6-0, with Trustee Jackie LaFever absent, to authorize Superintendent John Severson to apply to the state for a seat-time waiver that would allow the district to receive per-pupil revenue for kids outside of a traditional classroom.
6:51 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Saint Joseph seeks to preserve lighthouses

Lead in text: 
Estimated cost is $1.8-million
ST. JOSEPH - St. Joseph hasn't even taken possession of its historic lighthouses yet, and people are already volunteering to help restore them.
6:47 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Task force proposal would limit noise from downtown Kalamazoo venues by time of day

Lead in text: 
Louder decibel limits would be allowed late at nights, on weekends
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- A task force established to study downtown noise and propose regulations to the Kalamazoo City Commission laid the framework for a recommendation Monday. Guidelines established Monday would allow downtown Kalamazoo venues, including the Arcadia Creek Festival Place, to have certain levels of sound based on the time of day.
Business
5:28 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Modern Latinas Are A Challenge To Marketers

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Hispanic American are an increasingly important consumer demographic to woo. That's according to a new study from the market research firm Nielsen. The report says that most of today's Latinas are the primary decision makers when it comes to household spending.

But marketing to them is a real challenge, as NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji reports.

SHEREEN MARISOL MERAJI, BYLINE: Welcome to the home of the contemporary Latina consumer.

PAMELA MARIA WRIGHT: Hi.

MERAJI: Hi. How are you?

Good. How are you?

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Law
5:17 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Holder Unveils New Approach To Criminal Justice

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the Obama administration is trying to reduce prison time for some people convicted of less serious crimes. Attorney General Eric Holder outlined a new approach to criminal justice yesterday in a speech to the American Bar Association in San Francisco. He's targeting what he says is expensive and racially biased overcrowding in American prisons.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

ATTORNEY GENERAL ERIC HOLDER: Too many Americans go to too many prisons, for far too long, and for no truly good law enforcement reason.

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Shots - Health News
4:07 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Obamacare: People With Disabilities Face Complex Choices

Speech-language pathologists Jill Tullman (left) and Mendi Carroll (right) work with Bryce Vernon at Talking with Technology Camp in Empire, Colo., on July 25.
Kristen Kidd KCFR News

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

The Affordable Care Act has set new standards — called essential health benefits — outlining what health insurance companies must now cover. But there's a catch: Insurance firms can still pick and choose, to some degree, which specific therapies they'll cover within some categories of benefit.

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All Tech Considered
3:03 am
Tue August 13, 2013

A Closer Look At Elon Musk's Much-Hyped Hyperloop

A rendering of a Hyperloop pod.
Courtesy of Elon Musk

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

You can thank brainy billionaire Elon Musk's Hyperloop proposal for bringing electro-magnetic-powered transportation and the linear induction motor back into the public consciousness.

The Hyperloop is a system for really-really rapid transit. If built, Musk claims it can carry people about 800 miles per hour, which could get you from Los Angeles to San Francisco in about 30 minutes.

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The Salt
3:02 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Colorado Vault Is Fort Knox For The World's Seeds

Dave Dierig, research leader at the National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, stands among the ceiling-high shelves that hold the 600,000 seed packets in this cold storage vault.
Grace Hood KUNC

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

When unapproved genetically modified wheat was found growing in Oregon earlier this year, it didn't take long for accusations to start flying. A flurry of initial finger-pointing cast potential blame on a federal seed vault in Fort Collins, Colo., which housed the same strain of wheat, developed by Monsanto Corp., for about seven years up until late 2011.

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U.S.
3:01 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Of Bison, Birth Control And An Island Off Southern Calif.

Bison have been roaming the Santa Catalina Island since the 1920s. At one time they numbered more than 600.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

In an open-aired Jeep, it's a bone-jarring ride into Santa Catalina Island's vast interior. The dirt road winds and climbs, twists and turns, climbing 2,000 feet up.

From there, the deep blue of the Pacific Ocean comes back into view, and if you squint, you can see downtown Los Angeles 30 miles off on the horizon.

Some days, you can also see wild bison.

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The Record
12:03 am
Tue August 13, 2013

The White Mandingos: Music That Defies Definition

The White Mandingos are, from left, Sacha Jenkins, Murs and Darryl Jenifer.
Courtesy of Biz 3 Publicity

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 7:59 am

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9:40 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Republican state lawmakers call for alternatives to Medicaid expansion plan

Lead in text: 
Michigan Senate has three different proposals to consider later this month
Lansing - Two Republican state lawmakers were joined by other Medicaid expansion critics Monday in attacking the federal Affordable Care Act and urging rejection of a proposed expansion of the government health care coverage program for the poor in favor of their free-market alternative. Sen. Patrick Colbeck, R-Canton, and Rep.
9:31 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Demolition begins on WMU's East Campus

Lead in text: 
Three of the university's original buildings are slated for demolition. East Hall to become Alumni Center
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -Today marks the end of an era for Western Michigan University. Demolition began Monday afternoon on the university's East Campus. Shortly after 1 p.m., an excavator bit into the wall of the Speech and Hearing Building, right above the main entrance.
Music Reviews
5:27 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Shine And The Moonbeams: R&B For The Kids

Shawana Kemp, lead singer for Shine and the Moonbeams.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:03 pm

Family music comes in a broad range of styles – folk, rock, punk and even polka. But, compared with its popularity among adults, there have been very few R&B and soul music albums for kids. Enter Shine and the Moonbeams.

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Education
5:27 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Ala. School District Cancels Bus Service, Igniting Controversy

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

For many communities around the country, the yellow school bus is the quintessential sign that school is in session. Well, one school district is taking its buses off the roads. Citing the need to cut costs, district officials in Hoover, Alabama are canceling school bus service starting one year from now.

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Book Reviews
5:27 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Heading West: The Gritty, Luminous 'Son Of A Gun'

Justin St. Germain teaches at the University of New Mexico.
William Bledsoe

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:17 pm

My parents married young — both were still undergraduates — and so by the time my father started graduate school in mathematics, he and my mother were the harried parents of three small children. They wanted us to see America. And so my father chose the University of Arizona — about as far as you could go from our West Virginia home without falling off the country's opposite edge. On our way, we stopped in Tombstone.

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Robin Hilton is the producer and co-host for the popular NPR Music show All Songs Considered.

In addition to his work on All Songs, Hilton produces NPR Music live concerts and festival coverage across the country, including live broadcasts and webcasts from the Bonnaroo and Sasquatch festivals, South by Southwest and the Newport Folk Festival.

Prior to joining NPR in 2000, Hilton co-founded Small Good Thing Productions, a non-profit production company for independent film, radio and music in Athens, GA.

Hilton lived and worked in Japan as a translator for the government, and taught English as a second language to junior high school students.

All Songs Considered
4:45 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Question Of The Week: What Are The Best Apps For Making Music?

Apple's Garage Band for the iPad and iPhone includes virtual instruments, such as piano and drums, you can play like the real thing.
 

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 10:57 am

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Research News
4:42 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Particle Physicists Want A New Collider To Study The Higgs

This simulated image shows what information about a Higgs particle would look like in the proposed International Linear Collider.
Norman Graf interactions.org

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:03 pm

"It's a very curious time in high-energy physics," says Michael Peskin, a researcher at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in California. On the one hand, researchers have just made the most significant discovery in decades: In July of last year, they announced they had found the Higgs particle at a collider in Switzerland. The Higgs is part of the mechanism that gives mass to everything. It is so fundamental that without it, we wouldn't exist.

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Code Switch
4:26 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Medgar Evers' Son Honors Civil Rights Icon In His Own Way

After Medgar Evers was murdered, his wife, Myrlie Evers, carried on his work. This photo shows Myrlie Evers and her children, Van, 9; Darrell, 16; and Rena, 14, in June 1969 in their Claremont, Calif., home.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:06 pm

James Van Dyke Evers was only 3 when his father, Medgar, was assassinated in the driveway of the family's home in Jackson, Miss., in June 1963.

A sniper shot Medgar Evers in the back as he returned from a meeting late at night. Tensions had been running high because Evers, the first field secretary for the NAACP, was making headway in pushing the state's black citizens to register to vote. White Mississippians who had lived comfortably under segregation could feel the ground shifting beneath them — and they didn't like it.

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Film
3:19 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Elysium: Brainpower meets firepower in this Sci-Fi

In 2154, the setting of director Neill Blomkamp's science-fiction story Elysium, the gap between the haves and the have-nots has grown so wide that the two sides are literally not even on the same planet anymore.

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Sports & History
3:17 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Vintage base ball club takes the sport to a simpler time

Members of the Continental Base Ball Club shake hands with their opponents after a game.
Credit Chris Fusciardi

On Saturday you will get a chance to see what baseball would have looked like 150 years ago. It’s the last game of the season for the Continental Base Ball Club of Kalamazoo . The game starts at 4 p.m. at Flesher Field in Oshtemo. A vintage base ball team supported by Kalamazoo’s Historical Society. 

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Brains Of Dying Rats Yield Clues About Near-Death Experiences

Could the images common in accounts of near-death experiences be explained by a rush of electrical activity in the brain?
Odina iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 7:57 am

A burst of brain activity just after the heart stops may be the cause of so-called near-death experiences, scientists say.

The insight comes from research involving nine lab rats whose brains were analyzed as they were being euthanized. Researchers discovered what appears to be a momentary increase in electrical activity in the brain associated with consciousness.

Although the experiment relied on animals, the results could apply to humans, too, the researchers say.

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Jase Bolger
1:05 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Bolger admits mistake, but says investigation shows he followed rules

Jase Bolger - file photo
Credit The Associated Press

State House Speaker Jase Bolger says an Ingham County Judge's investigation shows he told the truth. 

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Book Reviews
12:43 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Addictive 'Infatuations' Takes A Metaphysical Look At Crime

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:48 pm

If you're like me, you probably feel exhausted just thinking about how much cultural stuff is out there. A friend recently told me he was reading an acclaimed Hungarian novelist whose books I've never opened. "Please tell me he stinks," I begged, "so I don't have to read him."

"Actually, he's great," came the reply, and I groaned. This was something I didn't want to know.

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Author Interviews
12:42 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Behind 'The New Black': The Real Piper's Prison Story

Taylor Schilling plays Piper in Netflix's Orange Is the New Black, which is based on Piper Kerman's memoir of her year in prison.
Jessica Miglio Netflix

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:18 am

Piper Kerman was a 24-year-old Smith College graduate in 1993, when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord.

This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with a woman who was part of what Kerman describes as a "clique of impossibly stylish and cool lesbians in their mid-30s." That woman was involved in a drug-smuggling ring, and got Kerman involved, too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

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