Business
4:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

White House Proposes Major Changes To Corporate Tax Code

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

President Obama traveled to Tennessee on Tuesday, another event in his recent push to emphasize jobs and the economy.

U.S.
4:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Where Do Drugs For Lethal Injections Come From? Few Know

A new law in Georgia makes information about where the state got its supply of lethal injection drugs a secret.
Ric Feld AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:45 pm

Several states are dealing with a shortage of lethal injection drugs and have had problems getting enough to carry out executions. In Georgia, lawmakers passed a measure that makes information about where the state got its supply a secret.

The Lethal Injection Secrecy Act says that the identity of people or companies that manufacture, supply or prescribe drugs used in executions is a state secret. But attorneys for death row inmate Warren Lee Hill are challenging the state over whether that law is constitutional.

Cruel And Unusual Punishment?

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Africa
4:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Zimbabweans Hope For Fair And Peaceful Presidential Election

A newspaper headline calls for the defeat of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe on the eve of elections in Zimbabwe on Tuesday in Harare.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 8:43 pm

Zimbabweans vote for a new president Wednesday, after a violent and disputed election in 2008 and five anxious and turbulent years since.

The much anticipated vote ends a power-sharing deal between veteran leader Robert Mugabe and his main political rival, who is the leading challenger in the presidential race.

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All Tech Considered
4:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Scott Simon On Sharing His Mother's Final Moments On Twitter

Simon's parents on their wedding day.
Courtesy of Scott Simon

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:33 pm

If you are among NPR host Scott Simon's 1.3 million Twitter followers, you likely know the news. Simon's mother, Patricia Lyons Simon Newman, entered a Chicago hospital on July 21 and died Monday night. She was 84 years old.

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Author Interviews
3:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Pioneering 'Masters Of Sex' Brought Science To The Bedroom

Human sexuality researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson Masters, shown in San Francisco in 1972.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:40 pm

William Masters and Virginia Johnson became famous in the 1960s for their groundbreaking and controversial research into the physiology of human sexuality. Instead of just asking people about their sex lives, Masters and Johnson actually observed volunteers engaging in self-stimulation and sexual intercourse. Changes throughout their bodies during arousal were measured with medical equipment.

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Governor Rick Snyder
1:33 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

WestSouthwest: Governor Rick Snyder

Govenror Snyder on WestSouthwest
Credit WMUK

Interview with Governor Rick Snyder

    

Govenror Rick Snyder is this week's guest on WestSouthwest. 

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The Record
1:12 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Maxwell's, The Beloved New Jersey Venue, Closes

Maxwell's, in Hoboken, N.J., hosted Bruce Springsteen, Nirvana and the Replacements, to name a few.
George Kopp

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:32 pm

The rock club Maxwell's is a tiny space that's hosted some of the biggest names in music for more than 30 years. R.E.M., Nirvana and many more bands have squeezed onto Maxwell's stage in Hoboken, N.J. Native son Bruce Springsteen recorded the music video for "Glory Days" there.

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Book Reviews
1:06 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

With 'Arrangements' And 'The Rest,' Two Debut Novelists Arrive

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:41 pm

The novel I've been recommending this summer to anyone, female or male, who's looking for the trifecta — a good story that's beautifully written and both hilarious and humane — is Seating Arrangements, Maggie Shipstead's debut novel from last summer. I was about to go all old-school and excitedly add that Seating Arrangements is now out in paperback, except since more and more readers are instantly downloading new books at a discount, paperbacks are becoming increasingly irrelevant.

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Music Reviews
12:48 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

'The Edenfred Files': Darryl Harper's Blues-Infused Jazz

Clarinetist Darryl Harper discovered jazz as a teenager in Philadelphia.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:41 pm

In jazz, the clarinet went into eclipse for awhile, drowned out by louder trumpets and saxes. The instrument has long since made a comeback, and the modern clarinet thrives in settings where it doesn't have to shout to be heard.

Take "Spindleshanks," a little out-of-sync boogie-woogie for Darryl Harper's clarinet and Kevin Harris' piano. It's from Harper's The Edenfred Files. In his long-running Onus Trio, the spare unit Darryl Harper features on most of his new album, he can sing softly as an owl in the night.

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U.S.
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Cities On The Brink: Lessons From Detroit

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We turn now to the debate about Detroit. It's been almost two weeks since Detroit became the largest municipality to file for bankruptcy in this country, but the debate on why it happened and what lessons, if any, other cities in the country can learn from it are still going on.

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Around the Nation
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Widows: Getting Your Kids On Board With The Dating Game

Dating after losing a spouse can come with a world of complications. And if you're a parent, it can be especially hard to explain new relationships to children. Two moms who lost their husbands share how they ventured back into dating and how their children reacted.

Music
12:04 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

'Life Goes On' For Author Benjamin Alire Saenz

Author Benjamin Alire Saenz's teen-lit novel Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe won big at this year's American Library Association awards. For Tell Me More's 'In Your Ear' series, he shares the songs that inspire him.

8:54 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Fewer high school grads hurting enrollment at Michigan universities

Lead in text: 
Western Michigan University, others, recruiting more out of state students
Though smaller classes of high school graduates are a phenomenon across the country, Michigan is home to the nation's second largest and fastest contraction. Only California is projected to lose more students at a faster rate, according to Knocking at the College Door, a report issued this year by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.
7:27 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Ingham County deputies providing security for Lansing-area Enbridge project

Lead in text: 
Security increased after protest-related arrests last week
Ingham County Sheriff's Office deputies are providing 24-hour security at the Enbridge 6B easement project site in southern Ingham County where 40 protesters converged last week.
7:12 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Supporters say more cities will soon vote on marijuana decriminalization

Lead in text: 
Kalamazoo among Michigan cities with similar ordinances on books
Proponents of legalizing marijuana in Michigan said they've collected enough signatures in Ferndale and Jackson to let voters make marijuana possession in those cities no worse than getting a traffic ticket.
6:42 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Benton Harbor vote on income tax expected in November

Lead in text: 
Impact study on income tax expected in two to three weeks
BENTON HARBOR - After some doubt about the timing, Benton Harbor residents are once again expected to be able to vote on the city income tax in this November's election.
Around the Nation
6:40 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Giant KFC Bucket Not Your Typical Yard Decoration

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In Waynesboro, Georgia, Aleena Headrick thought she was hallucinating when she saw a huge Kentucky Fried Chicken bucket in her front yard. Turns out her landlord collects vintage signs and put it there. It quickly became a big draw for gawkers, which Headrick finds amusing.

6:35 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Decision on fracking lawsuit expected in three weeks

Lead in text: 
Lawsuit alleges state violated law by not assessing environmental impact before auctioning oil and gas rights
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
Circuit Court Judge Amy McDowell she would issue a written opinion within 21 days on whether to grant the state's motion for summary disposition in a lawsuit challenging oil and gas leases sold by the state at auction in 2012 in the Allegan State Game Area, the Barry State Game Reserve and Yankee Springs Parks and Recreation Area.
6:05 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Pennfield asking again for public safety millage increase

Lead in text: 
Voters rejected proposal in May by 20 votes
Residents who support Pennfield Township's public safety millage proposal have formed a citizen group to help push for its approval. "We're actually voting on time," said Andy Halder, chairperson of Citizens for a Safer Pennfield and a part-time firefighter in Pennfield. "How much time you want before you get a response."
Around the Nation
5:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Missing Class Ring Turns Up 65 Years Later

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:46 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Richard Diedrich of Illinois lost his high school class ring in 1948. His girlfriend had been wearing it, but removed it to dissect a frog in biology class. It disappeared. Sixty-five years later, a guy name Mike Geiger was using a metal detector on a Wisconsin lake. He found the ring and contacted the school, looking for an alum with the initials RD. He says the first RD he reached wasn't friendly. The second can't believe he's got his ring again at age 82.

NPR Story
5:10 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Police: Jailbreak In Pakistan Frees More Than 250

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Pakistan, militants armed with heavy weapons have attacked a prison not far from the border with Afghanistan. According to police, around 250 prisoners were freed. The Pakistani Taliban is taking responsibility for the violent attack, which included mortars and rocket-propelled grenades. The hours-long middle-of-the-night battle left at least a dozen people dead, guards and civilians. With us now from the capital Islamabad is Sebastian Abbot. He's the bureau chief for the Associated Press there, and thank you for joining us.

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Yellen Emerges As A Top Choice To Lead Federal Reserve

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:46 am

Janet Yellen is on President Obama's short list to replace Ben Bernanke at the Federal Reserve.

NPR Story
5:10 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Survey Shows Regional Divide On Abortion

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

American attitudes towards abortion reflects strong regional differences in opinion, and a new poll shows that divide seems to be growing. For more on what Americans have to say about abortion, we're joined now by Michael Dimock. He's the director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, which conducted the survey. Good morning.

MICHAEL DIMOCK: Good morning.

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Dan Boyce provides radio and online reports daily from the State Capitol. A native Montanan, Dan was raised in Lewistown and graduated from the University of Montana with a broadcast journalism degree in December, 2008. He took the position of MTPR Capitol Bureau Chief after more than two years working as a reporter with KBZK-TV in Bozeman. Dan has won local, regional, and national awards for both his radio and television reporting. His work has appeared nationally on the NPR programs All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition as well as on CNN and The CBS Evening News. Dan has also taken part in journalism fellowships in both Germany and Pakistan.

Health Care
3:52 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Montana's State-Run Free Clinic Sees Early Success

Montana opened the first government-run medical clinic for state employees last fall. A year later, the state says the clinic is already saving money.
Dan Boyce for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:46 am

A year ago, Montana opened the nation's first clinic for free primary healthcare services to its state government employees. The Helena, Mont., clinic was pitched as a way to improve overall employee health, but the idea has faced its fair share of political opposition.

A year later, the state says the clinic is already saving money.

Pamela Weitz, a 61-year-old state library technician, was skeptical about the place at first.

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Movie Interviews
3:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

'Smash & Grab': How Pink Panthers Stole Millions In Jewels

Havana Marking's documentary Smash and Grab depicts members of the Pink Panthers, an international ring of jewel thieves.
Goldcrest Films

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:21 pm

In this age of cyber-crime and online espionage, here's a good old-fashioned story about cops and robbers: Smash & Grab, a new documentary film opening in New York on Wednesday, details the exploits of the "Pink Panthers" — a group of international jewel thieves that, for the past decade, has targeted high-end jewelry shops across Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

According to the international police agency, Interpol, the Pink Panthers have stolen nearly a half a billion dollars worth of jewels over roughly 500 robberies.

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The Salt
3:51 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Fast-Food Strikers Demand A 'Living Wage'

People gathered outside a Wendy's restaurant in New York City on Monday as part of a one-day strike calling for higher wages for fast-food workers.
Justin Lane EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 8:22 am

At a Wendy's restaurant in Lower Manhattan on Monday, protesters urged the lunchtime crowd to skip the Value Menu for one day. They blocked the sidewalk and half of the street.

Shanell Young held a red strike sign over her head. Young earns the minimum wage, $7.25 an hour, at another Wendy's in New York. She says that's not enough to support her and her 5-year-old son.

"It's horrible," says Young. "Everything goes up. It's unfair. You can't find an apartment. You can't pay for children's school uniforms. Everything is unfair. We can't live off this."

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Research News
3:15 am
Tue July 30, 2013

For Some Mammals It's One Love, But Reasons Still Unclear

Golden lion tamarins are one species that are largely monogamous.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 11:11 am

Fewer than 10 percent of all mammal species are monogamous. In fact, biologists have long disagreed over why monogamy exists at all. That's the subject of two studies published this week — and they come to different conclusions.

Animals that leave the most offspring win the race to spread their genes and to perpetuate their lineage. So for most mammals, males have a simple strategy: Mate with as many females as possible.

"Monogamy is a problem," says Dieter Lukas, a biologist at Cambridge University. "Why should a male keep to one female?"

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7:19 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Governor Snyder's office "disappointed" Perrigo to become Irish company

Lead in text: 
Perrigo announced acquisition of Ireland's Elan Pharmaceuticals on Monday
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
ALLEGAN, MI - Gov. Rick Snyder's office is disappointed Perrigo Co. will become an Irish company but is not ignoring company plans to continue investing in West Michigan.
Code Switch
6:24 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 2:26 pm

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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