Health
4:49 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Philly Murder Conviction Expected To Inflame Abortion Debate

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:19 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the murder conviction of Kermit Gosnell is likely to bring more sparks to the already heated abortion debate in Washington and across the nation. Those on both sides of the divide have been gearing up for what comes next. Here's NPR's Julie Rovner.

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Afghanistan
4:49 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Younger Generation Poised To Lead Afghanistan's Future

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:19 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne, in Kabul, Afghanistan.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, in Washington, with David Greene.

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Law
4:49 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Court: Philly Doctor Guilty Of Murder In Late-Term Abortions

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:19 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A Philadelphia doctor who performed late-term abortions is now facing multiple murder convictions and a possible death sentence. A jury found Kermit Gosnell guilty on three counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of three babies that prosecutors said were delivered alive and then killed. Gosnell was also found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of a female patient. He was acquitted on one count of murder in a fourth abortion.

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Education
4:49 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Latino High School Grads Enter College At Record Rate

Jackeline Lizama (front) plans to attend a local community college after she graduates next month from her high school in Silver Spring, Md.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:46 pm

If the headline caught your eye, here's more good news.

Seven in 10 Latino high school graduates in the class of 2012 went to college, according to a recent report by the Pew Hispanic Center.

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Author Interviews
3:28 am
Tue May 14, 2013

In Somalia, Surviving A Kidnapping Against 'Impossible Odds'

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:19 pm

In 2011, Jessica Buchanan was an aid worker in northern Somalia, helping to raise awareness about how to avoid land mines. The north was the relatively safe section of the country; that October, she traveled to the more dangerous southern region for a training. The night before she left, she texted her husband, Erik Landemalm, also an aid worker in Somalia. She asked him a question: "If I get kidnapped on this trip, will you come and get me?"

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The Salt
3:27 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Michigan Apple Orchards Blossom After A Devastating Year

Apple Blossoms
Amy Irish-Brown

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 8:20 pm

Last year, almost the entire Michigan apple crop was lost because of 80-degree days in March and then some freezing April nights. This year, the apples are back, but everything always depends on the weather. The state was under a freeze warning Sunday night — a scary prospect if you're an apple grower and your trees have just come into bloom.

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Author Interviews
3:26 am
Tue May 14, 2013

'Guns At Last Light' Illuminates Final Months Of World War II

British tanks move to support their infantry during the Battle of the Bulge.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:19 pm

In December 1944, the Nazis looked like a spent force: The U.S. and its allies had pushed Hitler's armies across France in the fight to liberate Europe from German occupation.

The Allies were so confident that the Forest of Ardennes, near the front lines in Belgium, became a rest and recreation area, complete with regular USO performances.

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Theatre
10:34 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Into the Woods: What happens after you get what you want?

Rudi Goddard (left) as Cinderella and Julia Smucker (right) as Little Red Riding Hood
Credit Kalamazoo College

Kalamazoo College’s Festival Playhouse is kicking off their 50th anniversary Thursday with the musical Into the Woods. Into the Woods by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine is about what happens to the characters in Grimm’s fairy tales after the ‘happily ever after.’ 

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Arts & More
9:25 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Peaches: A long-term commitment

The Donaldson peach orchard
Joan Donaldson

Silver barked peach trees crown many of the lakeshore’s hills. In the spring, their blossoms create a gossamer pink cloud while in the summer, their leaves droop like mustaches, hiding the ripening peaches. During the late nineteenth century, peach orchards generated thousands of dollars for Michigan farmers who sent their harvests to Chicago, Milwaukee, and beyond.

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Media
8:27 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

U.S. Obtained AP Journalists' Phone Records

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Today we learned of some news from the Associated Press in which the AP is at the center of the story. The newswire service reports that the Justice Department secretly obtained two months of editors and reporters' phone records from last year as part of a government investigation. Late today, the Justice Department issued a statement saying it strives to strike a balance between the need for information in criminal cases and the rights of individuals and news organizations.

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8:21 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Upton says Palisades must stay offline until problems are addressed

Lead in text: 
Congressman toured plant Monday with commissioner from Nuclear Regulatory Commission
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Eight days after Palisades Nuclear Power Plant shut down May 5, an inspection is still ongoing of the safety injection refueling water tank. Until that inspection is complete, residents of Southwest Michigan won't know what the permanent solution to repair the leaking tank will be.
7:23 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

School out for year in Buena Vista

Lead in text: 
Financial crisis closes schools. Education alternatives may be offered
BUENA VISTA TOWNSHIP, MI - Classes are over for the rest of the year at Buena Vista School District. State Superintendent Mike Flanagan, Saginaw Intermediate School District Superintendent Richard Syrek and Buena Vista School District Superintendent Deborah Hunter-Harvill met Monday, May 13, to come up with a plan to get students back into a learning environment.
7:14 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

KRESA board meeting Tuesday to name finalists for Superintendent

Lead in text: 
Current KRESA Superintendent Ron Fuller will retire at the end of June
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI -- The five members of the Kalamazoo Regional Educational Service Agency are meeting at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 14, to name a finalist or finalists to become the next KRESA superintendent. The board will go into a closed-door session to review the four people who submitted applications, said Ron Fuller, the current KRESA superintendent.
7:08 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Initial estimate shows good economic numbers for Holland's Tulip Time

Lead in text: 
Tulips bloomed right on time for this year's festival, in stark contrast to last year
The final numbers won't be tallied until later next month, but Tulip Time Executive Director Gwen Auwerda has declared the 2013 festival a blooming success. The parade route along Eighth Street was packed with locals and tourists Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday, while tickets for numerous Tulip Time events, including country music superstar Kenny Rogers, were difficult, if not impossible, to get.
All Tech Considered
6:16 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

ABC's Live Streaming Aimed At Keeping Cable Cords Intact

A new iPad app lets viewers watch live ABC programming starting Tuesday in New York and Philadelphia.
ABC

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:42 pm

There's another way television is moving online. Starting Tuesday, ABC will let viewers in New York and Philadelphia watch their local stations over the Internet. But this is not a way to cut your cable bill.

NPR's Dan Bobkoff discusses the change with All Things Considered co-host Audie Cornish.


Interview Highlights

On what's new here

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Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems
5:22 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

An 'Entrepreneurial Seedling' Sprouts In Detroit

A worker with The Empowerment Plan creates a coat that will later be donated to a homeless person. The organization works inside Ponyride, a 30,000-square-foot warehouse near downtown Detroit. The warehouse hosts other local businesses, too.
Courtesy of Order & Other

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:42 pm

Detroit is littered with empty warehouses — more than 7,000, by one estimate. They've become skeletons of the city's industrial past.

But not this warehouse, where Jennifer Blake is feeding quilted fabric through a sewing machine. She's making a coat. Fashioned with Velcro fastenings, it has a sleeping bag that slips out on the bottom, and is made of recycled car parts, she says.

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Parallels
5:15 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

As Stigma Eases, Single Motherhood In Mexico Is On The Rise

Maria Carlotta Santa Maria is a single mother in Mexico and is the sole wage earner in her household. Women like her are becoming more common there, and the stigma once associated with having children out of wedlock is fading.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 7:25 pm

On her daily route delivering laundry in her working-class neighborhood in southern Mexico City, Maria Carlotta Santa Maria, or Mari, as she is known, seems to know everyone: the mailman, the woman on the corner selling salty nuts, and her favorite greetings are for the guys at the corner gas station.

Mari is the kind of person that can make this inhospitable and overwhelming megacity seem almost small and friendly. But as a single mother, she says raising her 10-year-old daughter Jimena alone hasn't been easy.

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Media
5:11 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Bloomberg News Apologizes For Tracking Subscribers

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News is apologizing. That's after admitting his reporters tracked how subscribers use the company's famous financial data terminals. The disclosure has caused an uproar in the financial services world. As NPR's David Folkenflik reports, the episode has roots both in Bloomberg's innovations in data management, and its corporate culture.

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The Record
4:40 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

When The Right One Comes Along: How 'Nashville' Tells Stories In Song

Characters Scarlett O'Connor and Gunnar Scott are young, unknown artists in Nashville, just like the songwriters behind their song, "When the Right One Comes Along."
Katherine Bomboy-Thornton ABC

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 9:28 am

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All Tech Considered
3:14 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Facebook Users Question $20 Million Settlement Over Ads

Dado Ruvic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:42 pm

A San Francisco judge will decide this month whether to approve a settlement in a class-action lawsuit that could affect more than 70 million Facebook users. The $20 million deal would mark the end of a years-long battle over the social network's "Sponsored Stories" advertising.

But Facebook users' images could still appear in ads if they don't change their settings. And many users say the deal before the judge doesn't go far enough to protect their privacy.

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Parallels
3:05 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Five Years After A Quake, Chinese Cite Shoddy Reconstruction

The wife of Li Yiqian, Yang Liming, sits in their house, which is plastered with pictures of China's leaders, an attempt to help prevent local authorities from demolishing it. Her husband has been sentenced to three years in prison for organizing a crowd to create a disturbance; she believes it's for his work in helping dispossessed villagers petition.
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:42 pm

Five years after the massive Wenchuan quake in China's Sichuan province left about 90,000 dead and missing, allegations are surfacing that corruption and official wrongdoing have plagued the five-year-long quake reconstruction effort.

The official press is full of praise for how "all Chinese have a reason to be proud of what the concerted efforts of the entire nation achieved in creating a new life for the survivors."

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Parallels
3:05 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Vietnam's Appetite For Rhino Horn Drives Poaching In Africa

A Vietnamese rhino horn user displays her horn, which was a gift from her well-to-do sister. Last year, rhino horn sold for up to $1,400 an ounce in Vietnam, about the price of gold these days.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 5:42 pm

Africa is facing a growing epidemic: the slaughter of rhinos.

So far this year, South Africa has lost more than 290 rhinos — an average of at least two a day. That puts the country on track to set yet another record after poachers killed 668 rhinos in 2012.

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SW Michigan
2:46 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Upton: Get PCB's out of Kalamazoo landfill

Warning sign at Kalamazoo's Allied Paper Landfill
Credit WMUK

West Michigan Congressman Fred Upton says PCB contamination does not belong in Kalamazoo’s Allied Paper Landfill. The Saint Joseph Republican and Michigan’s two U.S. senators sent the Environmental Protection Agency a letter last week. It asked the agency to approve “total removal” of contamination at the site on Kalamazoo’s east side.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Why We Can't Look Away From True-Life Courtroom Dramas

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 2:25 pm

The trial of Jodi Arias, convicted of murdering her boyfriend, has become a national media sensation. Former Law and Order producer Robert Nathan and authors Laura Lippman and Walter Mosley explore why Americans are so drawn to real-life courtroom dramas.

NPR Story
2:05 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Drawing Security Lessons From Benghazi Mission Attack

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 2:33 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The disclosure White House emails is the latest twist in the controversy of how the Obama administration handled the attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi last September. Much of the debate here in Washington is over what happened afterwards and the roles of U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and President Obama.

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NPR Story
2:05 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Bangladesh Reveals Uphill Battle For Fair Trade Clothes

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 3:24 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. More than two weeks after a building collapse in Bangladesh, the number of bodies recovered stands at over 1,100. The building housed four factories that manufactured clothing. Bangladesh is the world's second-largest clothing exporter, in part because of a minimum wage of $37 a month, and in part because already lax fire and safety regulations were rarely enforced.

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Author Interviews
1:38 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

In 'Passage', Caro Mines LBJ's Changing Political Roles

Vice President Spiro Agnew (right) and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11 from the stands at the Kennedy Space Center on July 16, 1969.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 3:39 pm

For the past 37 years, Robert Caro has devoted his life to writing the definitive biography of Lyndon Johnson. So far, The Years of Lyndon Johnson has four acclaimed volumes and has shown readers just how complex the 36th president was, as both a politician and a man.

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Music Reviews
12:59 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Bing Crosby: From The Vaults, Surprising Breadth

A batch of reissues and archival releases from Bing Crosby's own vaults is getting a high-profile relaunch. Above, Crosby circa 1956.
Courtesy of Universal Music

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 3:27 pm

Bing Crosby was the biggest thing in pop singing in the 1930s, a star on radio and in the movies. He remained a top star in the '40s, when Frank Sinatra began giving him competition.

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12:20 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Fruit growers assess possible damage from cold

Lead in text: 
Fruit growers had enjoyed a good season before the freeze
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PAW PAW, MI -- When temperatures plummeted into the 20s overnight, most farmers were ready with wind machines and sprinklers to protect vulnerable fruit. But it will be a few days before they know how well their efforts worked, said Mark Longstroth, Michigan State University Extension educator, as he began his rounds Monday morning to assess damages.
Around the Nation
11:57 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Should Food Stamps Pay To Indulge A Sweet Tooth?

Millions of Americans rely on food stamps to keep from going hungry. They can also use them to buy sugary drinks. Some groups, including the National Center for Public Policy Research, say that's not right. Host Michel Martin discusses this with the Center's Justin Danhof, and University of Illinois Professor Craig Gundersen.

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