10:43 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Protest over Allied Paper landfill being held Wednesday

Lead in text: 
City has agreed to spend $200,000 for lobbying. Congressman Fred Upton and Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow have asked EPA to make sure PCBs are removed
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
lKALAMAZOO, MI - Kalamazoo City Commissioner Don Cooney and Kalamazoo Public Services Director Bruce Merchant on Monday discussed the latest developments in city's fight with the EPA over the Allied Paper landfill site. The Allied site sits in the city's Edison neighborhood and has been in the news since March, when the U.S.
Around the Nation
7:45 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Unsatisfied Fan Uses Tweets To Torment Players

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with a tool for sports fans to torment pro athletes. It's called Twitter. The NBA's New York Knicks lost to the Indiana Pacers Tuesday night, falling further behind in their playoff series. Knicks shooting guard J.R. Smith took responsibility even though he has a cold. Fans? No sympathy.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:40 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Security Tapes Show Supermarket Glutton Stuffing Himself

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

We do not know if Trevor Runyon will like the food in jail. But at least, by the time he got there, he was very well fed. Police say Mr. Runyon slipped into a supermarket and waited for it to close. Surveillance cameras show he then had a feast. He cooked and ate six steaks and washed them down with beer, shrimp and birthday cake. Once he was done, police found him hiding in the ceiling and 57 empty whipped cream cans were in the trash.

6:53 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Portage City Council approves agreement on closing District Court

Lead in text: 
District Court was closed after the retirement of Judge Carol Husum
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI - With no discussion, the Portage City Council has voted for a financial agreement with Kalamazoo County over the closing of the Shaver Road district court. The agreement calls for Kalamazoo County paying Portage $70,000 a year for 10 years to cover Portage's costs by the court closing.
Albion Schools
6:25 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Albion School Board votes to close high school

Albion High School
Credit Albion Public Schools

Interview with Justin Hinkley

    

Albion School Board members have voted to close the district's high school to cover a projected $1-million shortfall for next year.  The Battle Creek Enquirer reports the board voted 5-1 Tuesday night to become a K-8 district

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Politics
6:19 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Holder Called To Capitol Hill To Testify On Controversies

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 6:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Wednesday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Renee Montagne is in Afghanistan this week. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. When we think about the controversies swirling around Washington this week, there's a common denominator. They fall on the shoulders of Attorney General Eric Holder.

INSKEEP: First, news broke that the Justice Department secretly obtained phone records of Associated Press reporters and editors. This has ignited a First Amendment uproar.

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Around the Nation
6:19 am
Wed May 15, 2013

1 Month Since The Bombings, Signs Of Progress In Boston

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 7:25 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It has been one month since two bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people. Families of those killed continue to mourn their loved ones; and dozens of the more than 260 people injured continue their rehabilitation, many of them amputees who are now relearning to walk.

Meantime in Boston, all but one business has reopened. But as NPR's Tovia Smith reports, the city continues a slow and painful recovery.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRAFFIC)

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The Changing Lives Of Women
5:32 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Stay-At-Home Dads, Breadwinner Moms And Making It All Work

Dawn Heisey-Grove hands off Zane to Jonathan after a midday feeding. The couple were both working full time when Jonathan lost his job as a graphic designer two years ago.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 9:21 pm

The next time you see a father out shopping with his kids, you might need to check your assumptions.

"I'll get the, 'Oh, look, it's a dad! That's so sweet!' "says Jonathan Heisey-Grove, a stay-at-home father of two young boys in Alexandria, Va., who is pretty sure the other person assumes he's just giving Mom a break for the day. In fact, he's part of a growing number of fathers who are minding the kids full time while their wives support the family and who say societal expectations are not keeping up with their reality.

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Politics
3:35 am
Wed May 15, 2013

IRS Inquiries Crossed The Line, Tea Party Groups Say

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 9:51 am

Tea Party activists are calling for a full investigation, and possibly lawsuits, following revelations that the Internal Revenue Service flagged so-called patriot groups for extra scrutiny in applications for federal tax-exempt status.

Among those claiming unjust and unconstitutional targeting by the IRS is a group called TheTeaParty.net, which bills itself as the largest grass-roots conservative Tea Party organization in the country.

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The Salt
3:33 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Is Eating Too Little Salt Risky? New Report Raises Questions

Eat less salt, but not too much less.
iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 11:08 am

Americans are repeatedly told to cut back on salt to reduce the risk of heart disease. But there are new questions being raised about the possible risks of reducing sodium too much.

So, how low should we go? Currently, the government recommends that Americans should aim for 2,300 milligrams per day. And people older than 50, as well as those with high blood pressure, diabetes or kidney disease are advised to reduce sodium even further, down to 1,500 mg per day.

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Sweetness And Light
3:32 am
Wed May 15, 2013

No. 1s: The Latest Greatest Of All Time

Watch The Throne: Not so long ago Michael Jordan was the GOAT. Now, there's a groundswell to ordain LeBron James as the greatest-of-all-time basketball player.
Fred Jewell/Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 6:19 am

The Great Gatsby is on the screen again, re-opening the perennial debate about whether or not it is the great American novel. Or was that Huckleberry Finn? Or are we still waiting for the great American novel? Is the title vacant, like most recent Tour de France championships? In the arts, the argument over the great American novel is a rather unusual great fuss about the greatest. In most disciplines there simply doesn't seem to be a passion to constantly assess who's No. 1. Except, except ...

Except in sport.

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8:31 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Nothing official yet, but Schauer moving closer to campaign for governor

Lead in text: 
Several other potential Democratic candidates have said they won't run and have thrown their support to the former Congressman and state lawmaker from Battle Creek
Mark Schauer, 51, is in the final stages of preparing for a race for governor. He won't say definitively yet that he's in, but in an interview with the Free Press Tuesday, he said: 'I'm strongly leaning toward putting a campaign together and getting going. The desire is there.'
8:25 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Former WMU defensive end Freddie Bishop signs with Detroit Lions

Lead in text: 
Bishop joins former Bronco quarterback Alex Carder trying to make Lions' roster
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
Freddie Bishop did not have any clever sayings or jaw-dropping statistics while playing defensive end position for four years at Western Michigan University, but he was a model of hard work and consistency for the Broncos.
8:20 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Snyder says state should be cautious with surplus funds

Lead in text: 
Total revenues will still be slightly lower in 2012-13 than they were in 2011-12
LANSING - Gov. Rick Snyder said Tuesday the state should be cautious in allocating hundreds of millions of dollars in unanticipated revenue the Legislature's two fiscal agencies are projecting for the 2012-13 fiscal year that ends Sept. 30. "We need to be fiscally responsible about it," Snyder said at the Capitol.
8:15 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

WMU names new dean of Lee Honors College

Lead in text: 
Carla Koretsky will replace Nicholas Andreadis who is retiring at end of academic year
  • Source: Wmich
  • | Via: WMU news release
KALAMAZOO- Dr. Carla M. Koretsky, professor of geosciences and associate dean of Western Michigan University's Lee Honors College, has been named dean of the Lee Honors College, effective July 1. Koretsky has served as honors college associate dean since 2012.
8:12 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Wheeling, West Virginia manager withdraws from Kalamazoo search

Lead in text: 
Robert Herron is second candidate to withdraw from search for Kalamazoo City Manager. City Commission added two candidates to pool last week
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Hours after receiving a raise, Wheeling, W.Va., City Manager Robert Herron withdrew his candidacy to be Kalamazoo's next city manager. Herron confirmed Tuesday afternoon that he will receive a $15,000-per-year raise to stay in Wheeling, as reported by The Intelligencer/Wheeling News-Register.
U.S.
8:02 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

IRS Inspector General Faults 'Ineffective Management'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We have more details today on missteps by the Internal Revenue Service, specifically in the way the IRS processed applications for tax-exempt status by Tea Party groups and other conservative organizations. An Inspector General's report says the problems were not limited to low-level agency employees.

Last week the IRS apologized for targeting such groups for special scrutiny when they applied for tax-exempt status. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us now. Scott, what more have you learned from the Inspector General's report?

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Around the Nation
6:11 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

With No Unified Database, Many Murder Victims Remain Nameless

A family friend posts fliers after Samantha Koenig's disappearance in 2012. Koenig's father is now an advocate for a mandatory national missing persons database.
Erik Hill/Anchorage Daily News MCT/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

A serial killer who committed suicide in an Alaska jail last year confessed to murdering at least 11 people across the country. But Israel Keyes didn't name names, and investigators trying to figure out who he killed are running into a major stumbling block: There is no unified, mandatory national database for missing persons.

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Music Interviews
5:47 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Vampire Weekend: New Sounds Signal The End Of An Era

Vampire Weekend's third album is titled Modern Vampires of the City. Singer Ezra Koenig (far left) says he sees it as the closing chapter of a trilogy.
Alex John Beck Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 9:17 pm

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Middle East
4:57 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

A Sign of Disunity? Iranian Candidates Jockey For Position

Etrat Kazemi (center) registers her candidacy for the upcoming presidential election in Tehran, Iran, last week. More than 700 people have registered to run in the June 14 election.
Ebrahim Noroozi AP

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

Nearly 700 presidential hopefuls have thrown their names into the ring for Iran's June 14 presidential elections. But two last-minute entrants have altered the shape of the already-chaotic race: a former president once dismissed as a has-been and Iran's chief nuclear negotiator.

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Shots - Health News
4:56 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

How A Florida Medical School Cares For Communities In Need

With community-based health care a central part of its curriculum, Florida International University's medical school turned an RV into a mobile health clinic so that students could treat families in neighborhoods where medical care is scare.
Greg Allen/NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

If it's a Monday, you can usually find Dr. David Brown parked next to a lake in Miami, spending the day inside a 36-foot-long RV. He's not on vacation.

Brown is chief of family medicine at Florida International University's medical school. The RV is the school's mobile health clinic.

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Around the Nation
4:56 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Baseball's 'Most Durable Batboy' Marks 55 Years On The Field

Stan Bronson, 84, has been an honorary batboy for the University of Memphis Tigers since 1958. The university provides his food and medical care.
Mike Brown The Commercial Appeal/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 7:24 pm

The University of Memphis baseball team plays its final home game of the season Tuesday. In addition to rooting for the players, Memphis fans will cheer for someone else: batboy Stan Bronson Jr.

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Environment
3:35 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

With Rising Seas, America's Birthplace Could Disappear

Colonists built the original glass-blowing kiln in Jamestown, Va., at this beach for easy access to the sand. Now the site is just inches above the water level.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

By the end of the century, the birthplace of America may be underwater.

The first successful English colony in America was at Jamestown, Va., a swampy island in the Chesapeake Bay. The colony endured for almost a century, and remnants of the place still exist. You can go there and see the ruins. You can walk where Capt. John Smith and Pocahontas walked. But Jamestown is now threatened by rising sea levels that scientists say could submerge the island by century's end.

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Planet Money
3:34 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Who Hides Money Outside The Country?

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Belize, the home of our offshore company, Unbelizable.
Nagyman Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

Over the past decade, some 39,000 people have come forward voluntarily to tell the IRS about offshore money they haven't been paying taxes on. This group provides a small window into the world of people who are hiding money in offshore havens. (It's a world we've been trying to learn more about, partly by setting up an offshore company in Belize.)

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World
3:28 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Living On The Border, Driven — Literally — Underground

Abimael Martinez, who was deported from Riverside, Calif., sits next to the hole he dug to live in beneath the banks of Tijuana's fetid river canal.
Amy Isackson for NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:15 pm

After living underground in the United States — figuratively speaking — some undocumented immigrants deported to the Mexican border city of Tijuana are living in holes. These migrants have dug bunkers along Tijuana's sewage canal to protect themselves from police who routinely burn down their makeshift homes.

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Africa
3:05 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

The Enemy Inside: Rhino's Protectors Sometimes Aid Poachers

Mike Watson (left), CEO of Kenya's Lewa Conservancy, and conservationist Ian Craig identify the carcass of a 4-year-old black rhino named Arthur, whom poachers had killed the night before. The well-armed, well-informed poachers very likely used night vision goggles and a silencer on an AK-47.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 8:19 pm

It says a lot about the state of the war against poachers in Africa that the Lewa Conservancy, a private sanctuary in Kenya with 12 percent of the country's rhinos, recently appointed a CEO who has never studied zoology or biology. Instead, Mike Watson is an ex-captain in the British army.

His training has already come in handy. Take, for instance, a visit to a crime scene earlier this year: a rhino carcass splayed out in the mud.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

The Legacy Of Gen. Ridgway And America's War In Korea

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 12:07 pm

The ongoing conflict between North Korea and South Korea is the legacy of the Korean War, which can help explain relations between the two countries. In a new book, historian Victor Davis Hanson discusses how the strategies of U.S. Gen. Matthew Ridgway helped to turn around what appeared to be "a lost war."

Hanson, author of The Savior Generals, tells NPR's Neal Conan that although the three-year war "ended right where it began," it did allow for South Korea to flourish as a democracy.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Letters: New Orleans, Buzz Aldrin

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your comments. Last week we spoke with two doctors on how they discussed imminent death with their patients and patients' families.

Leila, a doctor, emailed us: Sometimes patients or families project their denial onto us as doctors. Some maybe more focused on honesty and others on optimism, misinterpreting honesty as pessimism, and they may blame us, the physician, for their selective listening. Sometimes all one can do is feel one's way through the conversation.

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NPR Story
1:52 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

The Promise And Limitations Of Telemedicine

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 2:07 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The doctor will see you now, words we've all heard many times, but more and more now doctors see their patients over a video link. For years, telemedicine has allowed doctors to treat patients anywhere, but as technology improves, new applications arise.

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Movie Interviews
1:22 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Gerwig, Baumbach Poke At Post-College Pangs

Director Noah Baumbach has made a name for himself with films such as The Squid and the Whale and Margot at the Wedding.
Wilson Webb IFC Films

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 2:33 pm

In the film Frances Ha, Greta Gerwig stars as the title character, a 27-year-old living a good but not particularly successful post-college life in New York City.

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