The Salt
4:05 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Catch Of The Day, Grilled The Turkish Way

Anglers fish off Galata Bridge in Istanbul in 2011. The bridge is within site of the modest waterside restaurant Akin Balik.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 10:17 pm

Each morning as dawn breaks over the Bosphorus Strait in Turkey, a small drama repeats itself: Massive oil tankers and cargo ships slide past tiny fishing boats bobbing on the surface like bathtub toys.

These intrepid fishermen are out in all weather, in all seasons. In the winter, they catch the rich, oily anchovies, bluefish and mackerel. With spring come the turbot and sea bream, and by summer, sea bass and red mullet are being hawked by the fishmongers.

Read more
Governor Rick Snyder
3:38 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Snyder says Detroit should be "model" for municipal bankruptcy

Governor Rick Snyder interviewed Thursday at WMUK
Credit Mike Lanka / WMU University Relations

Interview with Rick Snyder

    

Governor Rick Snyder spoke with WMUK, MLive Kalamazoo and the Battle Creek Enquirer during a visit to Kalamazoo on Thursday. 

Read more
Author Interviews
1:45 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

A Metro 'Revolution': Cities, Suburbs Do What Washington Can't

Philanthropic and business leaders have come together to revive the core of Detroit, which recently filed for federal bankruptcy protection.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:47 pm

When Detroit filed for federal bankruptcy protection last week, news accounts were filled with troubling stories of urban decay in the city: vast areas of vacant lots and abandoned houses, shuttered parks, nonworking streetlights and police response times close to an hour.

Read more
Health Care
1:37 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

For Bioethicist With Ailing Spouse, End-Of-Life Issues Hit Home

Margaret Battin's husband, Brooke Hopkins, was left quadriplegic after he collided with an oncoming bicycle while cycling down a hill in Salt Lake City.
Courtesy of The New York Times

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:14 pm

After writing books and essays about end-of-life issues, and advocating for the right to die, bioethicist Margaret Battin is wrestling with the issue in her own family. Her husband, Brooke Hopkins, an English professor at the University of Utah, where she also teaches, broke his neck in a bicycle accident in 2008, leaving him with quadriplegia and dependent on life support technology. In order to breathe, he requires a ventilator some of the time and a diaphragmatic pacer all the time. He receives his nutrition through a feeding tube.

Read more
Business
12:18 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Government Charges SAC In Insider Trading Case

Federal prosecutors have filed criminal charges against one of the most famous and successful hedge funds in the world. The government alleges that SAC Capital Advisors is criminally responsible for insider trading that went on at the firm.

NPR Story
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Hip-Hop Sign Language Is Hard Work

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:00 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE: This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, Michel Martin is away. Coming up, having honest conversations about race can require a lot of patience, but the writer behind the "Yo, Is This Racist?" blog says there's value in getting angry and even profane in those debates.

Read more
NPR Story
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

If You Have To Ask If It's Racist, It Probably Is

Talking about race can be difficult. But not for Andrew Ti, creator of the Yo, Is This Racist? blog and podcast. He bluntly takes on questions about racial sensitivity. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks Ti if he thinks he's helping or hurting the national conversation.

NPR Story
12:06 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

What's The 'Best Daym Takeout' In America?

Food critic and YouTube sensation Daymon 'Daym' Patterson travels the country to find the best takeout spots. He eats in the front seat of his car - when the food is hottest and freshest. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with him about his new Travel channel show Best Daym Takeout.

7:16 am
Thu July 25, 2013

House rejects Amash amendment to cut off funding for NSA programs

Lead in text: 
Grand Rapids Republican Justin Amash argued that amendment would protect privacy
Washington - A west Michigan sophomore lawmaker narrowly lost his fight in Congress Wednesday to end the controversial national surveillance program made public this summer by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. The effort by U.S. Rep. Justin Amash, R-Cascade Township, galvanized support from civil liberty activists and a leading liberal Democrat
6:56 am
Thu July 25, 2013

United Way pulls funding for Douglas Community Association

Lead in text: 
Financial troubles could lead to closing of organization serving Kalamazoo's north side
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
"Regrettably, the situation has reached a point at which United Way believes that it cannot, in good conscience and good stewardship, continue to provide funding to the Douglass Community Association," said Michael Larson, CEO and president of United Way of the Battle Creek and Kalamazoo Region.
6:35 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Kalamazoo Community Foundation to move into Arcus Depot

Lead in text: 
Arcus Foundation giving its space to Kalamazoo Community Foundation. Arcus will work out of office space in New York
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - The Kalamazoo Community Foundation is in no hurry to move out of the Comerica Building in downtown Kalamazoo, its chief executive officer said. "We have been very happy at the Comerica Building for years," said Carrie Pickett-Erway, president and chief executive officer of the community foundation.
6:23 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Obama administration proposes $50-million plan for keeping Asian Carp out of Great Lakes

Lead in text: 
Skeptics say plan should separate lakes from the Mississippi River
WASHINGTON - Federal officials said today they will test new tools to control the spread of Asian carp, including strengthening an electronic barrier in the Chicago area, as part of a new strategy for keeping the invasive species out of the Great Lakes.
Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu July 25, 2013

George H.W. Bush Shaves Head In Support Of Ill Toddler

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Former President George H.W. Bush has a new summer 'do. He shaved his head to show support for the son of one of his Secret Service agents. Two-year-old Patrick lost his hair from leukemia treatments. Bush and his wife lost a three-year-old daughter to leukemia nearly 60 years ago. A photo just released shows Patrick perched on Bush's knee with matching bald heads, blue shirts, and khakis. Bill Clinton tweeted: 41, you look great. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:56 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Believe In Fortune Cookie Predictions? After This, You Might

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

OK. Next time you open a fortune cookie, you might want to give the message careful consideration. Last week, after dinner out with his wife, William Johnson cracked open a fortune cookie. The little piece of paper inside told him: You will soon come into a lot of gold. The Southwick, Massachusetts man went out the next day, he bought a lottery ticket. He scratched it off, and the prize wasn't gold, but he could use it to buy a lot. He won a million dollars.

The Two-Way
5:27 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Steam And Groundwater Raise Concern At Japanese Nuclear Plant

Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) workers work on waste water tanks at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in the town of Okuma, Fukushima prefecture in Japan on June 12, 2013.
Noboru Hashimoto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:01 am

Read more
NPR Story
5:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Train Derailment Kills Scores In Spain

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:08 am

At least 78 people have died and more than 140 others have been injured after a train derailment in Spain. The high-speed train, carrying 218 passengers plus its crew, left the tracks as it went around a curve near the city of Santiago de Compostela. David Greene talks to Lisa Abend, who reports for Time magazine, for the latest.

NPR Story
5:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Collecting Taxes Among Detroit's Financial Troubles

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Detroit is broke. But a federal judge is holding hearings to determine whether Detroit is broke enough to qualify for bankruptcy protection. The court is examining whether the city has done everything possible to put more money in its coffers. Quinn Klinefelter of member station WDET reports one thing is certain - Detroit is struggling to bring into its coffers tax revenue.

Read more
NPR Story
5:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Making Sense Of Cleveland's Good And Bad News

The new Cleveland Convention Center is hosting its first major event, the National Senior Games.
Thomas Ondrey The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:13 pm

As Cleveland embraces national attention for everything from its booming arts and culinary scene to its redevelopment plans, it struggles with recent high-profile crimes. Some residents and tourists are left with news whiplash as they try to figure out what these diverging storylines say about the city.

Read more
Code Switch
3:41 am
Thu July 25, 2013

After Years Of Violence, L.A.'s Watts Sees Crime Subside

Los Angeles police officers take a break during a basketball game with residents of the Nickerson Gardens housing project in July 2011. Violent crime at Nickerson Gardens and two nearby housing projects has fallen by almost half since 2010.
Thomas Watkins AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:48 am

On most weeknights, in the middle of his shift, Los Angeles police officer Keith Mott trades his gun and uniform for a T-shirt and shorts, and heads to a park in the Watts neighborhood of South Los Angeles. He's there to coach 7- and 8-year-old boys on the Pop Warner Pee Wee football team, the Watts Bears.

The kids come from three nearby housing projects: Jordan Downs, Nickerson Gardens and Imperial Courts. The park was carefully chosen. It's a neutral site for local gangs. Otherwise, most of the Bears' parents wouldn't allow them to come and play.

Read more
Parallels
3:40 am
Thu July 25, 2013

South Africans Ponder A Nation Without Mandela

A well-wisher uses his phone to take a picture of a banner of photos of Nelson Mandela outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, where the former South African president is being treated.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:10 pm

From the township of Alexandra in Johannesburg, shack dwellers can look across a ravine to the spires of Sandton City, which houses the most lavish shopping mall in sub-Saharan Africa.

Alex, as this slum of roughly a half a million people is known, was home to Nelson Mandela when he first moved to Johannesburg in 1941.

Read more
Environment
3:38 am
Thu July 25, 2013

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry Over Wetlands

Canals created for navigation and oil and gas pipelines cut through the marsh off the coast of Louisiana, seen in 2010.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:49 am

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has lost roughly as much land as makes up the state of Delaware.

"If you put the state of Delaware between New Orleans and the ocean, we wouldn't need any levees at all," says John Barry, vice president of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. "There is this large buffer of land that has disappeared, and that buffer makes New Orleans much more vulnerable to hurricanes."

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
2:03 am
Thu July 25, 2013

The High, Heavenly Voice Of David Daniels

Countertenor David Daniels (right) and dancer Reed Luplau in the Santa Fe Opera's world-premiere production of Oscar, based on the life of Oscar Wilde.
Ken Howard Santa Fe Opera

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 9:19 am

"You very quickly forget whether it's a male voice or a female voice. ... Because he's such a terrific musician, and so expressive, the fact that it's a man singing in a woman's range becomes irrelevant, and what we hear is the music."

Read more
9:32 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Military Police Company welcomed home in Portage

Lead in text: 
U.S. Army Reserve unit, stationed in South Bend, Indiana left in August of last year
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI -- Sgt. Michael Weaver, of the 428th Military Police Company was excited to return to Battle Creek and go to Qdoba Mexican Grill with his family Wednesday, but when he got off the bus at the U.S. Army Reserve Training Center Wednesday, his focused shifted.
9:20 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

State Senate work group proposes alternative for expanding Medicaid

Lead in text: 
Senate leaders say proposal will require waivers from federal government
LANSING, MI -- A bipartisan state Senate workgroup has unveiled its draft proposal to reform Medicaid in Michigan and expand eligibility to up to 470,000 working adults using federal funding provided through the Affordable Care Act.
Europe
7:21 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Royals Reveal New Baby's Name

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Finally this hour, the news that some of you at least have been anxiously awaiting. The royal baby has a name, several of them, in fact. George Alexander Louis. We'll break down that monitor for you now.

Read more
National Security
7:03 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

House Rejects Measure That Would Have Curbed NSA Program

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

On Capitol Hill, an effort to limit the authority of the National Security Agency has fallen short. It was the first chance for House lawmakers to vote on the government's phone surveillance program since news of it was leaked by Edward Snowden. They rejected an amendment that the White House and top intelligence officials had lobbied hard against.

NPR's Tamara Keith joins us from Capitol Hill. And, Tamara, the amendment was defeated. How close was it?

Read more
Environment
5:29 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

What's Swimming In The River? Just Look For DNA

Biologists normally look for the hellbender slamander, which is known by the nickname "snot otter," under rocks in streams. But now there's a gentler way: They can take water samples and look for traces of the animals' DNA.
Robert J. Erwin Science Source

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:34 pm

If you want to protect rare species, first you have to find them. In the past few years, biologists have developed a powerful new tool to do that. They've discovered that they can often find traces of animal DNA in streams, ponds — even oceans.

The idea took root just five years ago, when biologists in France found they could detect invasive American bullfrogs simply by sampling pond water and looking for an exact genetic match to the frogs' DNA.

Read more
Business
5:29 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Full-Time Vs. Part-Time Workers: Restaurants Weigh Obamacare

The California Tortilla chain is one company still deciding how to react to the new health care requirements for business, set to take effect next year.
John Ydstie NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:21 pm

Many businesses that don't offer health insurance to all their employees breathed a sigh of relief earlier this month when they learned they'd have an extra year to comply with the new health care law or face stiff penalties.

Read more
Code Switch
5:29 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How Musicians Helped Integrate The Silver Screen

When Gene Krupa's orchestra was cast in 1941's Ball of Fire, trumpeter Roy Eldridge's presence was not negotiable.
Express Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:28 pm

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How A Family Copes With Schizophrenia And Suicide

Homer Bell's family: sister Laura Bell (from left), sister Regina Bell, mother Rosalind Scott and stepfather Jack Wilcox.
Jeff Cohen WNPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:21 pm

Homer Bell was 54 years old when he killed himself in April in a very public way — he laid down his head in front of a stopped bus in his hometown of Hartford, Conn. It was the last act in a life filled with struggle, as Bell and his family endured his schizophrenia.

At a time when there are calls to strengthen the mental health system, Bell's story shows how hard coping with mental illness can be.

Read more

Pages