World Transplant Games
8:58 am
Wed July 24, 2013

WestSouthwest: Retired WMU professor competing in World Transplant Games

David Rozelle (center) at the World Transplant Games in Sweden in 2011
Credit Courtesy of David Rozelle

Interview with David Rozelle

    

Retired WMU Professor of Accountancy David Rozelle is "one of the lucky ones" thanks to a heart transplant. 

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Military Voices
8:56 am
Wed July 24, 2013

WestSouthwest: StoryCorps Founder David Isay

Colonel David Sutherland, WMUK General Manager Gordon Bolar and his wife Elly Bolar at the launch of Military Voices Initiative in December
Credit StoryCorps

Interview with David Isay

    

Award winning public radio producer David Isay launched StoryCorps in 2003. The oral history project has since collected nearly 50,000 interviews. 

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7:20 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Bell's Brewery files lawsuit against Enbridge and developer over dredging plan

Lead in text: 
Lawsuit says dredging will negatively impact brewery operations in Comstock Township
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
COMSTOCK TOWNSHIP, MI - Bell's Brewery has filed a lawsuit against Enbridge and the developer of Comstock Commerce Park over dredging plans that are part of the ongoing cleanup of the Kalamazoo River oil spill.
7:16 am
Wed July 24, 2013

WMU football picked to finish 5th in MAC West

Lead in text: 
Media members who cover Mid-American Conference pick Northern Illinois to win West division, Ohio to win East
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
DETROIT -- Mid-American Conference media members did not set the bar very high for the Western Michigan University football team this season. The Broncos are coming off a 4-8 season and have a new first-year head coach in P.J.
Around the Nation
6:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Nine Months After Sandy, New Jersey's Seeing A Baby Boom

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

6:35 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Report calls for basing teacher evaluations on trained observers, test scores

Lead in text: 
Report for Governor Rick Snyder and lawmakers is part of changes to Michigan's teacher tenure law
A teacher's classroom practice, as well how much students learn during the year, would be the main components of a new teacher evaluation system being proposed for Michigan. The recommendation for the system came Wednesdaywhen the Michigan Council for Educator Effectiveness submitted its report to Gov.
6:20 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Report estimates Saugatuck and Douglas could save $500,000 through consolidation

Lead in text: 
Citizens Research Council report finds savings would come from staff cuts
A combined Saugatuck-Douglas could save more than $500,000, a new report from the Citizens Research Council of Michigan says. Critics dispute the numbers. The question of whether to consolidate will be on the Nov. 5 ballot. In the meantime, both cities are digging through the numbers of the report they commissioned.
World
6:17 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Biden Escapes Monkey Business On Trip To India

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Security for Joe Biden's trip to India is tight, but agents couldn't do much about some rowdy troublemakers during a stop at the Gandhi Memorial. About a dozen monkeys took over a tree above a statue where the vice president would be posing. The Wall Street Journal says they swung on branches and threw half-eaten mangoes to the ground. Photographers held their breath as Biden and his wife approached - luckily, no falling mangoes or other monkey business.

6:12 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Effort begins in Battle Creek to end discrimination against gays

Lead in text: 
Group wants to collect 1,000 petition signatures before next City Commission meeting
About 40 people gathered Tuesday night at St. Thomas Episcopal Church to find a way to end employment and housing discrimination against non-heterosexuals. Currently, gay, lesbian and transgender people can be refused jobs, fired and discriminated against for housing if they are perceived to be or present themselves as outwardly gay.
6:07 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Village of Augusta votes to file lawsuit against Enbridge Energy

Lead in text: 
Deadline this week with three year anniversary of pipeline rupture and massive oil spill on Kalamazoo River
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
AUGUSTA, MI - The village of Augusta, concerned about the future safety of its water supply, plans to file a lawsuit against Enbridge Inc. The three-year anniversary of the 2010 pipeline burst, which caused what has been called the worst and most costly oil spill in U.S.
NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

House To Vote On Defunding NSA Phone Surveillance

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The U.S. House of Representatives is taking up the issue of domestic spying. Lawmakers are expected to vote today on an amendment that would reign in the National Security Agency program that collects the phone records of millions of Americans. This would be the first vote on the matter since the scope of the NSA program was made public in a series of leaks. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports, at issue is an amendment to the defense appropriations bill.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Tucson Revives Mexican-American Studies Program

The Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) is resurrecting its Mexican-American studies program.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Three years after it was banned by the state of Arizona, the Tucson Unified School District (TUSD) is resurrecting its Mexican-American studies program due to a federal court order. The courses are now known as culturally-relevant classes and are set to begin in a couple of weeks, when the school year begins. And they hold the same potential for controversy.

The TUSD board's decision to bring back the ethnic studies program was a whole lot less contentious than its decision to end the Mexican-American studies classes three years ago.

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NPR Story
4:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Manning Trial Heads Into Closing Arguments

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Closing arguments in the Bradley Manning trial are scheduled for tomorrow. The Army private first class admitted to perpetrating the largest leak of classified data in U.S. history. That's when he sent secret government documents to Wikileaks in 2010. The U.S. government has charged Manning with 22 offenses. The most serious is aiding the enemy, and he could face life in prison if he's convicted.

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All Tech Considered
3:23 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Online Marketers Take Note Of Brains Wired For Rewards

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

Ask yourself: Are you addicted to technology — any technology? Do you check email obsessively, tweet without restraint or post on Facebook during Thanksgiving dinner? Or perhaps you are powerless in the face of an iPad loaded with Angry Birds?

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Sports
3:06 am
Wed July 24, 2013

'Beep Baseball' A Homerun With Blind Players

Ryan Strickland takes a practice swing. Even though most players are legally blind, batters, basemen and outfielders all wear blindfolds in Beep Baseball so that people who can see shadows, for example, don't have an advantage.
Jessica Robinson for NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

The air smells like cut grass and barbecue at Friendship Park in north Spokane, Wash. And Bee Yang is up to bat. The outfielders get ready. Yang is known as a power hitter.

But this is not your usual baseball game. There's a twist: most of the athletes on the field are visually impaired. Players know where the ball is by listening for it. It's called Beep Baseball, named for the beeping sound the balls make.

Yang listens for the pitch.

He swings.

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Music News
3:05 am
Wed July 24, 2013

In Hollywood, The Actor Who Gives The Call To Prayer

"The bottom line is my Muslim friends have no idea what it's like to be an actor, and my actor friends have no idea what is it like to be a Muslim," Ben Youcef says.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 10:05 am

For the next year, NPR will take a musical journey across America, which is one of the most religiously diverse countries on earth. We want to discover and celebrate the many ways in which people make spiritual music — individually and collectively, inside and outside houses of worship.

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Code Switch
3:04 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Being In The Minority Can Cost You And Your Company

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

The racial wage gap in the United States — the gap in salary between whites and blacks with similar levels of education and experience — is shaped by geography, according to new social science research.

The larger the city, the larger the racial wage gap, according to researchers Elizabeth Ananat, Shihe Fu and Stephen L. Ross, whose findings were recently published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

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July 24th, 2013
12:01 am
Wed July 24, 2013

WSW: StoryCorps Military Voices and the World Transplant Games

WMUK General Manager Gordon Bolar speaking at the launch of the Military Voices Initiative in Washington D.C.
Credit StoryCorps

WestSouthwest for July 24th, 2013

On this week's WestSouthwest, StoryCorps Founder David Isay discusses oral history. And retired Western Michigan University Professor David Rozelle prepares for the World Transplant Games. 

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Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

NCAA Should 'Bolster And Reinforce' African-American Players

Jaimie D. Travis iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:59 am

"And this is a long-term project: We need to spend some time in thinking about how do we bolster and reinforce our African-American boys? And this is something that Michelle and I talk a lot about. There are a lot of kids out there who need help who are getting a lot of negative reinforcement." President Obama

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Around the Nation
6:19 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Weiner Says He Won't Drop Campaign For NYC Mayor

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block. Disgraced former congressman - and current New York City mayoral candidate - Anthony Weiner is apologizing again, this time after the publication of still more lewd messages and photos that Weiner exchanged online with a woman who is not his wife.

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Monkey See
6:16 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

90 Years Later, 'Safety' Still The Last Word With Harold Lloyd

Harold Lloyd (left) is the All-American Boy, a striver who'll brave nearly anything to get to the top and win The Girl. Noah Young is The Law (center) and Bill Strother is The Pal.
Criterion Collection

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:16 pm

There may be no film image more iconic: Harold Lloyd, high above the street, dangling from the minute hand of a giant department-store clock.

The face of the clock swings down; the minute hand bends. It's been 90 years since the silent era's greatest daredevil shot that sequence, and it still has the power to prompt shrieks and laughter.

Lloyd's character was the All-American Boy, innocent in his horn-rimmed glasses, eager to climb the ladder of success — and like many a social striver before him, he was plagued by anxiety that he'd fall before he got to the top.

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Animals
6:16 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Nevada Wildfire Could Snuff Out A Rare Butterfly

The Mount Charleston blue butterfly is a rare species found only in a few small areas high up in Nevada's Spring Mountains.
Corey Kallstrom USFWS

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:10 pm

A big wildfire in a mountain range just west of Las Vegas has put at risk the Mount Charleston blue butterfly, a rare species found in the U.S.

The fire is dying down, but it may be weeks before experts can get to the remarkable area where this butterfly lives to see if it made it through.

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Theater
5:34 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

'Love's Labours,' Tuned Up And Playing In The Park

Daniel Breaker, a Juilliard-trained actor who's earned praise for roles as varied as Donkey in Shrek the Musical and the protagonist Youth in Passing Strange, gets to play a king in a new musical adaptation of Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost.
Tammy Shell The Public Theater

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:14 pm

A few years ago, after songwriter Michael Friedman and writer-director Alex Timbers had finished working on their cheeky historical musical Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, they decided to look for a new project to work on. Friedman says they wanted the next show to have a completely different feel.

"So we started looking at Shakespeare," Friedman says. "And then, I think, we came to sort of, 'How amazing would it be to work on a romantic comedy?' "

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U.S.
5:34 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Laws Tightening Abortion Rules Gain Traction In States

Dr. Howard Novick says new abortion restrictions in Texas could force him to close the Houston clinic he opened in 1980. He says he doesn't have the more than $1 million required to convert his office into a surgical center with wide corridors and sophisticated airflow systems.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:31 pm

A judge has temporarily blocked a North Dakota law that would have banned abortions beginning around six weeks, when a fetal heartbeat is detectable. It's one of several state laws passed this year intended to limit abortion.

Those backing the new rules say they will make abortions safer. But abortion-rights advocates say the laws are about politics, not safety.

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Music Interviews
4:41 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Guy Clark, Music's Master Craftsman, On Making Songs Last

Tools line the walls of Guy Clark's basement workshop at his home in Nashville, where he still builds guitars.
Jinae West NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:16 pm

If you want to learn how to write a song — one that's built to last, with vivid characters and images that plant you squarely inside a scene — listen to Guy Clark.

Songwriters who revere Clark will tell you he crafts songs with the same precision and attention to detail he uses when he builds guitars. But Clark has a simpler, blunter explanation, as he told me with a glint in his eye when I visited him recently at his home in Nashville, Tenn.

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Lizzie Skurnick's reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, The Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and "many other appallingly underpaying publications," she says. Her books blog, Old Hag, is a Forbes Best of the Web pick and has been anthologized in Vintage's Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks from the Wild Web. She writes a column on vintage young-adult fiction for Jezebel.com, a job she has been preparing for her entire life. She is on the board of the National Book Critics Circle.

Religion
4:13 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Jubilation, Protest Greet Pope Francis In Brazil

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:16 pm

Pope Francis arrived in Rio de Janeiro on Monday and was greeted by adoring masses and protesters alike. It is his first foreign trip since becoming pope.

Book Reviews
4:13 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Popes, Politics And Power: The Story Of The Borgia Family

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:16 pm

If every era gets the historical fiction it deserves, we have been good indeed. From the transcendent psychological rummagings of Hilary Mantel to the gooey pleasures of Philippa Gregory, we can set aside flowery bodice-rippers (not that there's anything wrong with those) and view the dusty figures through lenses literary, pop culture-y, or near-pornographic.

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Asia
4:13 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Families Of Poisoned Children Try To Cope In India

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 6:16 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In India, police have widened their hunt for the principal of an elementary school. It's the place where 23 children died last week after eating a toxic school lunch. The principal has been missing, along with her husband, since the day the children fell sick. An arrest warrant has been issued for her. In the meantime, parents of the victims are trying to cope with the tragedy. NPR's Julie McCarthy visited some of the families who live in one of India's poorest states.

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