The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Funny Man Jonathan Winters Dies

Jonathan Winters on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour in 1969.
CBS /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 5:20 pm

Jonathan Winters, known to one generation for his 1960s comedy albums, frequent Tonight Show with Johnny Carson appearances and comic movie characters, and to another generation as Robin Williams' baby on Mork & Mindy, has died. The news is coming from The Associated Press, TMZ, the NPR Arts Desk and other news outlets.

Winters was 87. TMZ says he died Thursday night "of natural causes in Montecito, Calif. ... surrounded by friends and family.

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2:50 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

WMU medical school construction begins

Lead in text: 
Late awarded sub-contracts and frozen ground has caused some delays for the $68 million project.
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Excavation work is underway at the site of Western Michigan University's new medical school. The chilliest March in 15 years caused a few delays, said Christopher Pyzik, project manager for Western Michigan University. But the construction manager, Walbridge, has assured him the $68 million project at 300 Portage St.
1:13 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Update: Michigan officially receives permit to build second bridge between Detroit and Canada

Lead in text: 
Governor Snyder says construction of bridge will create about 12,000 construction jobs and as many as another 31,000 indirect jobs
It's official. The U.S. State Department announced its issuance of a presidential permit to the state of Michigan for the New International Trade Crossing between Detroit and Windsor, Ontario, But legal fireworks are still expected: While the issuance of the permit is a huge move, Manuel (Matty) Moroun, who owns the 84-year-old Ambassador Bridge, is expected to continue his fight to block the rival NITC.
Movie Reviews
11:48 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Terrence Malick And Every Man's Journey 'To The Wonder'

Olga Kurylenko and Ben Affleck play two lovers in Terence Malick's latest film, To The Wonder.
Mary Cybulski Courtesy Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:17 pm

The voiceovers from Terrence Malick's To the Wonder, which has a lot of them, are intoned on the soundtrack while the characters stare into sunrises or sunsets — whenever the light is right, what cinematographers call, "the magic hour." This film and Malick's last, The Tree of Life, suggest that he's evolved into a blend of director and Christian minister: These are psalms writ on film.

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Author Interviews
11:48 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Lemony Snicket Dons A Trenchcoat

Meredith Heuer Courtesy of Little, Brown & Co.

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:17 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Dec. 10, 2012.

It has been more than six years since Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, concluded his enormously popular 13-volume young adult series, A Series of Unfortunate Events. Handler recently revived the Snicket narrator, however, in his YA novel Who Could That Be at This Hour?

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Music Interviews
11:48 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Dale Watson: A Honky-Tonk Man With An Outlaw Spirit

Dale Watson (second from left) and His Lonestars. Their new album is titled El Rancho Azul.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 11:34 pm

Honky-tonk veteran Dale Watson has an impressive white pompadour and arms that tell his story: flag tattoos of Alabama, where he was born, and Texas, where he lives. Musical notes circle his biceps. And he has an inked portrait of his first musical inspiration — his late father, a truck driver and sometime country singer who passed on to Dale his love of traditional country, from Hank Williams to Lefty Frizzell.

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NPR Story
11:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Venezuela Oil Diplomacy: From Caracas To Cuba

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we'll speak with the Reverend Jim Wallis. He's a well-known evangelical leader. He's known for stepping into the political fray on issues he cares about. So we'll ask him why he chose to step out of the spotlight during last year's presidential campaign. That's later in the program.

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Barbershop
11:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Barbershop Guys Weigh In On 'Accidental Racist'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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Faith Matters
11:30 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Pastor Jim Wallis Back To Being Political

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, March Madness 2013 is now a memory, but there's still one champion yet to be announced. Yes, we are going to announce the winner of our TELL ME MORE March Madness Challenge. That's just ahead.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Pouring Over The Science Of Coffee

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 6:55 am

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Up next, another mover and shaker in the alimentary canal - coffee. Whether you're a home brewer or a latte devotee, whether you take it light and sweet or on ice, your coffee is guaranteed to be chock full of chemistry. It starts in the bean, which is actually not a bean at all.

It's a seed, according Harold McGee, author of "On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen" along with other books on science and food. And we caught up with Harold, to hear more about how coffee gets its signature taste.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Monitoring the Monarchs

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

Next up, a case of life imitating art. A few months ago, we talked to writer Barbara Kingsolver about her latest book, "Flight Behavior." The book is a fictional account of an ecological disaster in the making, and the fate of millions of monarch butterflies is at the center of the plot. Would the species survive? That's the art part.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Looking To Nature For Antibiotic Inspirations

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. Later in the hour, a teenage science activist and the plight of the monarch butterfly. But first, researchers have developed a new way to fight antibiotic-resistant microbes by borrowing a trick from a longtime foe of the bacteria, the bacteria phage.

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NPR Story
11:04 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Red Meat's Heart Risk Goes Beyond The Fat

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira today. You know the phrase you are what you eat? Well, new research suggests a slight modification: Your gut bacteria are what you eat. And if you eat more red meat, for example, you'll nurture populations of microbes that like to eat red meat, too, which might not seem like a bad thing except that researchers have pinpointed a compound in red meat called L-carnitine that when broken down by gut bacteria might contribute to heart disease.

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NPR Story
10:55 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Consumers Cut Back, Sales Reports Show

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with less shopping.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Middle East
8:07 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Police In Dubai Adds Lamborghini To The Force

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Conspicuous consumption is the art of buying lots of expensive stuff to show off. It is part of daily life in the Emirate city of Dubai, even for the police. They just added a slick green and white Lamborghini with a $400,000 price tag to their force. It goes more than 200 miles per hour, which is useful in the fast moving kingdom.

Police say about 15 percent of the speeding tickets go to motorists going more than 130 miles per hour. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

WMUK News
7:56 am
Fri April 12, 2013

"Invisible War": sexual assault in the military

Navy Seaman Recruit Hannah Sewell embraces her father, Sergeant Major Jerry Sewell, from "The Invisible War", a Cinedigm/Docurama Films release.
Credit Cinedigm

The U.S. military faces renewed pressure to prevent sexual abuse within its ranks. A documentary about the problem called The Invisible War will be shown in Kalamazoo on Monday, April 15th, and in Battle Creek on Tuesday, April 16th. The screening at Western Michigan University’s Little Theatre on Oakland Drive starts at 6:30 p.m. The Battle Creek showing in the Binda Auditorium at Kellogg Community College starts at 5:30 p.m.

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7:47 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Announcement on new bridge with Canada could come today

Lead in text: 
Permit is one of last hurdles to clear before construction can begin
The presidential permit for the New International Trade Crossing has been approved, and the announcement will be made today in Detroit by Gov. Rick Snyder, the Free Press has learned. Jeff Holyfield, a spokesman for Snyder, said the governor will be in Detroit today for an economic development announcement, but he would not confirm the news about the presidential permit.
7:39 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Kalamazoo School Board says Superintendent Michael Rice "exceeds expectations" in evaluation

Lead in text: 
Board says vote on superintendent evaluation was unanimous
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Kalamazoo Public Schools Superintendent Michael Rice received a glowing evaluation from his school board Thursday, which said he "continues to make exceptional progress in leading our district."
Asia
7:25 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Japanese Blogger Obsesses Over Vending Machine

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

For most of us, the office vending machine is good for a mid-day pick-me-up; that's pretty much it. But for one Japanese man it is much more. He hosts a blog called "I Take a Picture of the Vending Machine Every Day or So, I'm Very Sorry." Since 2005 he's taken nearly daily pictures of the same vending machine. Over the years the sodas move, the ads change, and there was that true moment of drama - the machine started taking digital payments.

6:22 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Berrien County property values down, but decline is slowing

Lead in text: 
Report shows fourth consecutive year that property values have declined, but percentage is lower than past years
ST. JOSEPH - The decline in property values in Berrien County is slowing, signaling a return to stability in the real estate market, an official said Thursday.
Business
5:49 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Eli Lilly To Lay Off 30 Percent Of U.S. Sales Force

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 11:25 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with layoffs at Eli Lilly.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Latin America
5:49 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Venezuela's Telenovelas

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Hugo Chavez, the late president of Venezuela, had a touch for the dramatic. He appeared on television all the time. It turns out, he also admired dramatic acting. In the 1990s, when he was in prison for an attempted coup, he never missed an episode of his favorite TV drama.

Once he gained power, a deeper drama developed. Venezuela was a huge exporter of Latin-American multi-episode dramas called telenovelas, until President Chavez's government changed that. NPR's Jasmine Garsd reports.

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Business
5:49 am
Fri April 12, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is, what do you want on your burger? The CEO of Burger King Worldwide is stepping down. Forty-three-year-old Bernardo Hees has been wearing the Burger King crown since 2010, when the fast food chain was bought out by 3G Capital.

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Media
3:33 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Startup CEO Wields Small Antenna In TV Streaming Battle

Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia
Dan Bobkoff NPR

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:30 pm

A top executive at News Corp. dropped a bombshell this week when he said the company is considering taking Fox's over-the-air network to cable. The announcement follows a court win for a startup company that streams broadcast channels online.

That startup's CEO, arguably the most feared man in television right now, is soft-spoken and rather techy.

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StoryCorps
3:33 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Adoptive Dad Dreamed A Dream That Brought Him A Son

John Curtis with his 11-year-old son, John Wikiera.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 4:19 pm

In 1998, John Curtis and David Wikiera adopted a son from Vietnam and named him John Wikiera.

"I had always wanted to be a parent," Curtis tells his now 11-year-old son during a visit to StoryCorps in Rochester, N.Y. "So it was a dream I had, but I never dreamed would come true because Papa and I are gay. But we had some friends who started thinking about adoption and that got us thinking.

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Music
3:31 am
Fri April 12, 2013

The Thatcher Era's Effect On British Music

Morrissey, an outspoken critic of Margaret Thatcher, is one of many U.K. musicians who responded to the late British leader's reforms in song.
Album cover

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

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Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

The Two-Way
1:43 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Ryan Says He's 'Cautiously Optimistic' On A Bipartisan Budget Deal

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan speaks about his new budget plan after a March 19 party conference.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan tells NPR that he's "cautiously optimistic" that a budget deal can be reached with the White House.

Speaking to NPR a day after President Obama unveiled a 2014 budget proposal that includes cuts to Social Security and Medicare, as well as tax increases and new investments in education and infrastructure, Ryan said he was encouraged by the broad outlines from the White House.

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Books
12:35 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Oil, Chavez And Telenovelas: The Rise Of The Venezuelan Novel

Venezuelan author Romulo Gallegos (1884-1969), circa 1950.
Edwin Karmiol Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Marcela Valdes is the books editor of The Washington Examiner and a specialist in Latin American literature and culture.

For more than 40 years, the most important book prize in South America has been bankrolled by the region's most famous petro-nation: Venezuela. Yet Venezuelan novelists themselves rank among the least read and translated writers in the entire continent. Over and over again as I worked on this article, I stumped editors and translators with a simple question: Who are Venezuela's best novelists?

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Albion College
9:04 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Albion College names interim president

Michael Frandsen
Credit Albion College

Albion College says its vice president of finance and administration will serve as interim president. 

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