Media
3:33 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Startup CEO Wields Small Antenna In TV Streaming Battle

Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia
Dan Bobkoff NPR

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 1:30 pm

A top executive at News Corp. dropped a bombshell this week when he said the company is considering taking Fox's over-the-air network to cable. The announcement follows a court win for a startup company that streams broadcast channels online.

That startup's CEO, arguably the most feared man in television right now, is soft-spoken and rather techy.

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StoryCorps
3:33 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Adoptive Dad Dreamed A Dream That Brought Him A Son

John Curtis with his 11-year-old son, John Wikiera.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 4:19 pm

In 1998, John Curtis and David Wikiera adopted a son from Vietnam and named him John Wikiera.

"I had always wanted to be a parent," Curtis tells his now 11-year-old son during a visit to StoryCorps in Rochester, N.Y. "So it was a dream I had, but I never dreamed would come true because Papa and I are gay. But we had some friends who started thinking about adoption and that got us thinking.

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Music
3:31 am
Fri April 12, 2013

The Thatcher Era's Effect On British Music

Morrissey, an outspoken critic of Margaret Thatcher, is one of many U.K. musicians who responded to the late British leader's reforms in song.
Album cover

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

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Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

The Two-Way
1:43 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Ryan Says He's 'Cautiously Optimistic' On A Bipartisan Budget Deal

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan speaks about his new budget plan after a March 19 party conference.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan tells NPR that he's "cautiously optimistic" that a budget deal can be reached with the White House.

Speaking to NPR a day after President Obama unveiled a 2014 budget proposal that includes cuts to Social Security and Medicare, as well as tax increases and new investments in education and infrastructure, Ryan said he was encouraged by the broad outlines from the White House.

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Books
12:35 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Oil, Chavez And Telenovelas: The Rise Of The Venezuelan Novel

Venezuelan author Romulo Gallegos (1884-1969), circa 1950.
Edwin Karmiol Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:55 am

Marcela Valdes is the books editor of The Washington Examiner and a specialist in Latin American literature and culture.

For more than 40 years, the most important book prize in South America has been bankrolled by the region's most famous petro-nation: Venezuela. Yet Venezuelan novelists themselves rank among the least read and translated writers in the entire continent. Over and over again as I worked on this article, I stumped editors and translators with a simple question: Who are Venezuela's best novelists?

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Albion College
9:04 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Albion College names interim president

Michael Frandsen
Credit Albion College

Albion College says its vice president of finance and administration will serve as interim president. 

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8:46 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

German manufacturer plans to open facility in Battle Creek

Lead in text: 
Battle Creek Unlimited officials say six other cities were under consideration for Bleistahl project. 58 jobs will come to Battle Creek
Another global auto supplier is bringing its business to Battle Creek. Bleistahl North America is expected to open a manufacturing facility at 190 Clark Road in the Fort Custer Industrial Park this summer, Doug Voshell, marketing director for economic development group Battle Creek Unlimited, said Thursday.
8:40 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

KPS to hold public forums on $62-million bond proposal

Lead in text: 
Voters will consider bond proposal on May 7th. It would pay for various improvements to district facilities
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Officials at Kalamazoo Public Schools are holding informational forums on April 17 and 30 on a $62 million bond proposal on the May 7 ballot. The April 17 session will be at Loy Norrix High School and the April 30 forum will be at Kalamazoo Central High School.
Asia
6:07 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Report: North Korea May Be Able To Deliver Nuclear Weapons

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. A stunning revelation today from a member of Congress. It came from Republican Doug Lamborn, of Colorado, during an exchange on Capitol Hill with Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Lamborn cited a Defense Intelligence Agency report on North Korea's military capability, one that had not yet been released. Here's what Rep. Lamborn said.

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5:52 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

State Graduate Medical Education funding remains intact

Lead in text: 
The Senate Community Health Subcommittee did not approve Governor Rick Snyder’s proposal for a more than $1.4 million cut. Senator John Moolenar of Midland told Gongwer News Service that the state needs more physicians. Though Graduate Medical Education will have its current funding, the budget did not include an expansion for Medicaid.
"As you consider that there are shortages of physicians throughout our state, and in fact in my district you can go two hours without having an OB doctor, and so that is a serious health concern," Sen. John Moolenaar (R-Midland), chair of the subcommittee, told reporters after the meeting.
5:49 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Recalled knee surgery tool could cause damages, death

Lead in text: 
Stryker recalled ShapeMatch Cutting Guides in November for concerns that the tool may cause the knee not to work properly.
KALAMAZOO, MI - Stryker Corp.'s voluntary recall of its ShapeMatch Cutting Guides is being classified as a Class I recall by the Food and Drug Administration, meaning there is reasonable probability the product could cause serious adverse health consequences or death.
Business
5:47 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Japan's Big Stimulus Move Shocks Globe's Market Watchers

Passersby watch share prices spike in Tokyo on April 4, the day Japan's central bank announced a massive purchase of government bonds. The bank hopes the scale of the effort will boost Japan's slow-moving economy.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Currency traders were stunned last week by aggressive action from Japan's central bank. The Bank of Japan embarked on a bond-buying program that, by one measure, is twice the size of the extraordinary moves by Ben Bernanke and the Federal Reserve in the United States. The BOJ's move is an effort to shock the Japanese economy out of more than a decade of sluggish growth and deflation.

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Film
5:39 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Amour: A film about true devotion

You can see Amour at Western Michigan University’s Little Theatre. The first showing is Friday night at 7.

There’s a good reason why so many love stories end with the couple heading for the altar or happily running off together. That’s because falling in love is easy and staying in love can be very hard work -- especially if you spend 30 or 40 or 50 years with the same partner.

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Arts & More
5:34 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Silent film screening to feature live performance by famous klezmer musician

From 'The Yellow Ticket'
Credit Boston Jewish Music Festival

During this year’s Jewish Film Festival in Kalamazoo, movie-goers will get a chance to see the 1918 silent film, The Yellow Ticket. Most films in the festival will be shown at Celebration Cinema this weekend.

“It’s talking about a young Jewish woman who emigrates from Poland to Russia to study medicine, which is quite a progressive concept I think for a film that was made in the early 1900s,” says organizer Naomi Morse of the Jewish Federation of Kalamazoo and Southwest Michigan.

During the screening, viewers will get to hear the film’s score performed live by famous klezmer musician Alicia Svigals and pianist Marilyn Lerner. Klezmer is a type of Jewish folk music that originated in Eastern Europe.

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It's All Politics
5:13 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Looking To Broaden Appeal, RNC Heads To Hollywood

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks at the National Press Club in March. Priebus has irritated faith-based values voters and others in the GOP with his quest to retool the party following the losses of 2012.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

The Republican National Committee is holding its spring meeting in the Democratic stronghold of Hollywood this week — part of an effort to broaden the party's appeal.

So far, there are sharp divisions among RNC delegates about the future direction of the GOP. But there's general agreement that the party isn't effectively communicating its message.

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Around the Nation
5:13 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Fair Or Foul? Pigeon Shoots Ruffle Feathers In Pennsylvania

A sportsman participates in a pigeon shoot in Pennsylvania in 2009. Animal-rights activists want to ban the tradition in the state.
The Humane Society of the United States

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Animal-rights activists are hoping for change in Pennsylvania, where they're fighting to end a tradition: live pigeon shoots. At the events, shooters compete to hit birds that are launched into the air.

Elissa Katz remembers feeling helpless at the site of a pigeon shoot, with feathers flying through the air and wounded birds falling to the ground. "They flutter up in the air as they are sprung from boxes. Shooters have shotguns, they are at fairly close range, and they blast away at the birds," she says.

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4:49 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Subcommittee doesn't approve $1.2 billion road repairs

Lead in text: 
It’s now the full Senate Appropriations Committee’s turn to look over the transportation budget.
LANSING - The state transportation budget advanced in the Senate today without the extra $1.2 billion in road and bridge funding called for by Gov. Rick Snyder, just as the main budget bill cleared the House Appropriations Committee today, also without the extra money.
Space
4:17 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Origin Of 'Mercury' Meteorite Still Puzzles Scientists

Several fragments of this unusual rock were discovered last year in Morocco. It's been hailed as the first meteorite from the planet Mercury, but where it came from in the solar system isn't certain.
Stefan Ralew

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 8:18 am

A strange green rock discovered in Morocco last year was hailed by the press as the first meteorite from Mercury. But scientists who've been puzzling over the stone ever since say the accumulating evidence may point in a different direction. Maybe, just maybe, they say, the 4.56-billion-year-old rock fell to Earth from the asteroid belt located between Mars and Jupiter.

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Local Music
3:29 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

A bassoonist, a soprano, and a violinist walk onto a stage

University Symphony Orchestra
Credit WMU

The 54th annual WMU Concerto Competition will showcase soprano D. Giles Simmer, violinist Youyang Qu, and bassoonist Minyuan Yang. 

Conductors Bruce Uchimura and Jeffrey Spenner describe the talents of each; talk about the process of choosing winners from a wide range of specialties, and preview the major work on the second half of the concert, Mendelssohn's Symphony No. 5, "Reformation."

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Asia
3:15 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

A Symbol Of Korean Cooperation Becomes A Political Casualty

A South Korean soldier patrols as vehicles returning from the jointly run Kaesong industrial complex in North Korea arrive at a checkpoint in Paju, north of Seoul, on April 6.
Lee Jae-Won Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:33 pm

This week, North Korea closed off the last avenue of economic cooperation with its rival, South Korea. Pyongyang says the closing of Kaesong — a joint North-South industrial complex — is temporary.

But the move is a big symbolic blow on the Korean peninsula and a potential disaster for some of the South Korean businesses that have invested there.

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Book Reviews
3:00 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Beauty Marks: Patricia Volk's Lessons In Womanhood

Patricia Volk is an essayist, novelist and memoirist. She grew up in a restaurant-owning family in New York City.
Random House

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 12:12 pm

I've loved Patricia Volk's writing ever since I read her evocative 2002 memoir, Stuffed, which told the story of her grandfather — who introduced pastrami to America — as well as the rest of her family, who fed New Yorkers for more than 100 years in their various restaurants. Stuffed, like the best food memoirs, served up so much more on its plate than just a bagel and a schmear. So when I picked up Volk's new memoir, Shocked, my appetite was already whetted for the humor of her writing, its emotional complexity and smarts.

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Author Interviews
3:00 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Living With Chronic Pain 'In The Kingdom Of The Sick'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 3:28 pm

Laurie Edwards has a chronic respiratory disease so rare that she's met only one other person who has it — and that was through the Internet. In and out of hospitals her entire life, Edwards, now 32, wasn't accurately diagnosed until she was 23. Before they correctly identified her condition — primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), which is similar in some ways to cystic fibrosis — doctors thought she might be an atypical asthma patient, that she wasn't taking her medications correctly, or that her symptoms were perhaps brought on by stress.

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Found Recipes
2:59 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

A North Carolina Pie That Elicits An 'Oh My God' Response

Bill Smith's Atlantic Beach Pie is based on a recipe for lemon pie, a staple of the North Carolina coast.
Courtesy of Katie Workman

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

There are days for cake, and days for ice cream and cookies. But every now and then, you crave a different kind of finish to a satisfying meal. Enter Atlantic Beach Pie, a salty and citrusy staple of the North Carolina coast.

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Around the Nation
2:38 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

How Parents Talk To Children About Consent

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:40 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. In late 2011, four teenage boys at a party allegedly raped a 15-year-old girl in Nova Scotia. A picture of the incident circulated among classmates and then went viral. In a Facebook post, the girl's mother said she'd been shunned by her friends, bullied and called a slut. She moved, transferred schools, made new friends, started therapy, but a week ago Rehtaeh Parsons hanged herself. Her family took her off life support this past Sunday.

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Medical Treatments
2:35 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Is There A Doctor Aboard? Medical Emergencies In The Clouds

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Theater
2:32 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

'Matilda' Brings Beloved Book To Broadway

The Broadway cast of Matilda the Musical, including Olivier Award-winning actor Bertie Carvel as the barbaric headmistress Miss Trunchbull.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Matilda is a well-loved book by Roald Dahl, who's been called the greatest children's storyteller of the 20th century. It's about a much-put-upon little girl with tremendous gifts. Now, Matilda has been turned into a Broadway musical.

The British import, which won last year's prestigious Olivier Award and features a revolving cast of four little girls in the lead role, opens in New York tonight.

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World
2:16 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

What's At Stake In Elections In Venezuela And Pakistan

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Elections come up in Venezuela this weekend and Pakistan next month, two very different places of critical importance to the United States and to their regions. More on Pakistan in a few minutes.

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Music Reviews
1:10 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Earl Hines: Big Bands And Beyond On A New Box Set

Earl "Fatha" Hines' band featured the likes of Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.
Express Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 3:28 pm

By 1928, Earl Hines was jazz's most revolutionary pianist, for two good reasons. His right hand played lines in bright, clear octaves that could cut through a band. His left hand had a mind of its own. Hines could play fast stride and boogie bass patterns, but then his southpaw would go rogue — it'd seem to step out of the picture altogether, only to slide back just in time.

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Politics
12:03 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Rand Paul And Minorities, 'A Date Or A Relationship?'

Senator Rand Paul is reaching out to African-American voters. He recently visited Howard University, one of the country's most prominent historically black universities. Senator Paul talks to host Michel Martin about why he's reaching out, and what his message is for minorities.

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