National Security
11:53 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Can Privacy And Security Go Hand In Hand?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Conservatives upset with Snyder
11:04 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Tea party activists say they'll withhold support from Snyder's re-election bid

Governor Snyder - file photo
Credit WMUK

Interview with John Lindstrom

    

Several tea-party activists in Michigan are urging conservatives to sit out Governor Snyder's bid for re-election next year.  Updated with Gongwer News Service Publisher John Lindstrom

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9:03 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Shipping suffers because of lower Great Lakes water levels

Lead in text: 
Spring rains have helped but Lakes Michigan and Huron remain below average levels
Aboard the Dorothy Ann, in Lake Erie near Fairport Harbor, Ohio - As Capt. Jeremy R. Mock steered this 711-foot combination of tug and barge toward a harbor berth, a screen of red numbers indicated the decreasing depth of water under the vessel: 6 feet, 3.6 feet, 2 feet.
Around the Nation
7:35 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Hillary Clinton Sends Her First Tweet

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Hillary Clinton was probably too busy to tweet during her years as secretary of state, senator, and, well, Twitter didn't exist when she was first lady. But yesterday, she send out her first tweet. She hasn't posted much yet but her Twitter bio is getting lots of attention. She describes herself as wife, mom, hair icon, glass ceiling cracker and pantsuit aficionado. As for 2016 plans, the bio offers a simple TBD. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
7:32 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Holiday Inn In North London Hopes To Horrify Guests

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

A North London Holiday Inn is hoping to horrify its guests, and we're not talking about rude clerks at reception. To promote the horror film, "Mama," the hotel has received a gory makeover. Rooms with blood-soaked sheets and scary graffiti also included paranormal visitations designed to trigger a flight or fight response.

Good evening, it's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:28 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Detroit Emergency Manager says public safety is priority

Lead in text: 
Kevyn Orr says tough choices lie ahead to avoid bankruptcy
Emergency manager Kevyn Orr, in his first public hearing since he was appointed to take over the troubled city in March, sought to reassure residents that Detroit will emerge from his tenure streamlined, with less debt and a plan to keep it that way.
6:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Battle Creek School Board delays action on budget cuts

Lead in text: 
District faces a $2.7-million shortfall for 2013-14
In a 4-1 vote Monday night at Battle Creek Board of Education decided to postpone the approval of budget reductions until June 17. Board Vice President William Burton was the only board member to vote against tabling the budget reductions for now.
Business
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Data Leak Could Undermine Trust In Government Contractor

Federal contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, headquartered in McLean, Va., employed Edward Snowden, the computer technician at the center of the controversy over leaks involving the National Security Agency.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 11:56 am

In recent decades, a quiet revolution has been transforming the way Washington works.

Because the U.S. government does not have the workforce to complete all of its tasks, it employs private companies like Booz Allen Hamilton to do the work for it. Booz Allen is the company where Edward Snowden, who said he leaked secrets about the National Security Agency, most recently worked.

Over the past 25 years, this contract workforce has grown and plays a major role in the U.S. government, says Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University.

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Religion
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Churches Reconsider Sponsoring Boy Scout Troops

Some churches have said they will end their affiliation with the Boy Scouts after its decision to allow openly gay members to join. Others, including Southern Baptists, are considering their next move. Another group plans to hold a meeting in Louisville later this month with parents who say they want a more Christian organization for their children.

National Security
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Will Surveillance Disclosure Lead To More Oversight Of NSA?

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The recent leaks revealing the extent of the National Security Agency surveillance programs came as news to many people. But some members of Congress have been warning for years that such surveillance could threaten the privacy of average Americans.

NPR's Larry Abramson reports that in the end, it was Congress that decided not to disclose details about these programs to the public.

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Law
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Feds Buckle On Emergency Contraception Age Restrictions

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The morning after pill is moving from behind the counter to on the shelf. Last night, the Obama administration announced it will comply with a court order that allows girls and women of any age to buy the emergency contraception without a prescription and without showing ID.

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Theater
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Disruptive Broadway Audiences Master Stage Whisper

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

There have been several incidents, even fights, during recent New York theater performances. An argument over a woman nosily unwrapping her Twizzlers, a man throwing a Web-browsing woman's cell phone across the theater. What is going on? Are audiences less well mannered today?

We sent NPR's Margot Adler to find out.

MARGOT ADLER, BYLINE: I'm standing around the TKTS line on Broadway, where tourists and New Yorkers line up for lower priced tickets. Are audiences increasingly boorish?

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National Security
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

As Government Surveillance Powers Grow, Privacy Is Redefined

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:33 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Since the events of 9/11, the public has had several glimpses into the government's growing surveillance powers. But as NPR's Martin Kaste reports, the resulting scandals and the losses appear to have done little to roll back that surveillance.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: The first real case of surveillance blowback came as early as 2002.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DANIEL SCHORR: The most far-reaching plan yet for domestic snooping is being researched in the Pentagon. It is called Total Information Awareness, TIA.

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Michele Norris is one of the most respected voices in American journalism. As NPR host and special correspondent, Norris produces in-depth profiles, interviews and series, and guest hosts NPR News programs.

Norris also leads the "The Race Card Project," an initiative to foster a wider conversation about race in America that she created after the publication of her 2010 family memoir, The Grace of Silence. In the book she turns her formidable interviewing and investigative skills on her own background to unearth long hidden family secrets that raise questions about her racial legacy and shed new light on America's complicated racial history.

The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:13 am

As we head into the summer months, NPR is looking back to the summer of 1963, a momentous year in civil rights history. As part of NPR's partnership with The Race Card Project, which asks people to distill their thoughts on race to six words, Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris is asking people who were on the front lines of history to share their memories and their thoughts on race in America today.

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Politics
3:18 am
Tue June 11, 2013

How The Senate Farm Bill Would Change Subsidies

Third-generation Oklahoma farmer Scott Neufeld says crop insurance is important to his family's business.
Tamara Keith NPR

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 3:40 pm

The Senate voted Monday to approve its version of the farm bill, a massive spending measure that covers everything from food stamps to crop insurance and sets the nation's farm policy for the next five years.

The centerpiece of that policy is an expanded crop insurance program, designed to protect farmers from losses, that some say amounts to a highly subsidized gift to agribusiness. That debate is set to continue as the House plans to take up its version of the bill this month.

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Music News
3:16 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Spotlighting Background Singers In 'Twenty Feet From Stardom'

Darlene Love, one of the background singers featured in Twenty Feet From Stardom, didn't receive credit for singing hits in the 1950s and '60s and says her career was derailed by legendary producer Phil Spector.
Radius/TWC

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 10:22 am

Twenty Feet from Stardom, filmmaker Morgan Neville's new documentary, is a reminder that most of pop music's catchiest hooks, riffs and refrains were sung by voices harmonizing in the background. Neville says he wanted to put backup singers — black, female and honed in church — front and center.

"I was really more interested in people who were voices for hire," he says, "who were able to walk into sessions never knowing what they had to do and could bring it."

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Code Switch
11:58 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

A Meeting On Tolerance Turns Into A Shouting Match

Sabina Mohyuddin was heckled as she spoke at the town meeting last week in Manchester, Tenn.
William Hobbs

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 12:33 pm

The public meeting in Manchester, Tenn., about 70 miles from Nashville, was supposed to address and tamp down discrimination toward Muslims there.

But instead it turned into a shouting match.

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NPR Story
10:35 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Feds Drop Opposition To Restriction On Sales Of Morning-After Pill

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The morning-after pill will soon be available - without a prescription - on pharmacy shelves, with no restrictions on age. That's because the Obama administration has dropped a long-running battle to keep age restrictions on emergency contraception. NPR's Julie Rovner joins me to explain this policy change. And Julie, this was an unexpected development. It came tonight. What happened?

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9:57 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commission to consider four firms for city manager search

Lead in text: 
Commissioners fired search firm last month, they weren't satisfied with candidates for manager
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The Kalamazoo City Commission selected four firms, including one Kalamazoo firm, to interview for its rebooted city manager search. City commissioners decided to invite Colin Baenziger & Associates of Wellington, Fla., Strategic Government Resources of Keller, Texas, Voorhees Associates LLC of Deerfield Ill., and Welsh & Associates of Kalamazoo to interview in-person with city commissioners.
Music
8:44 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

The Yanks: A spontaneous combustion of Irish music

Credit The Yanks

The brand new band The Yanks features four young American soloists in Irish music. They're making a stop in Kalamazoo on their first midwest tour Sunday, June 16th at the Kalamazoo Nature Center. The show starts at 3:00 p.m. in the Cooper's Glen Auditorium. From the very beginning, the band has relied on its spontaneity as well as mastery of fiddle, pipes and flute, accordion and guitar.

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Film
8:40 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Waterfront to show Vanilla Ice movie, shocking killer whale documentary, and more

It’s the question the world has been asking for more than 20 years: What was it really like to work with Vanilla Ice on his ill-fated Cool as Ice movie? Actress Kristin Minter will tell all as part of this year’s Waterfront Film Festival, which kicks off Thursday evening in downtown South Haven.

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7:37 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Apple crop improved over last year

Lead in text: 
Last year's smaller harvest was caused by damaging cold
Farmers say an overabundance of product is a problem, though.
7:29 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

State House hearing set for this week on Medicaid expansion

Lead in text: 
Substitute bill calls for some who receive Medicaid benefits after 48 months to pay some out of pocket costs or buy private insurance through exchange
LANSING - Republicans who control the Michigan House are working on changes to a Medicaid reform and expansion proposal. A substitute bill being worked on Monday afternoon would no longer have a strict, 48-month time cap on benefits for able-bodied adults -- a provision many considered unlikely to win a waiver from the federal government.
7:17 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Changes proposed to term limits in Michigan

Lead in text: 
Holland Republican Joe Haveman's proposed amendment to state Constitution would allow lawmakers to serve 16 years total in House and/or Senate
Term limits will end Rep. Joe Haveman's tenure in the State House next fall. The Holland Republican plans to introduce a bill that would relax those term limits - but it would not apply to him or his colleagues.
Local Music
6:25 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

David Baldwin brings a wealth of experience to Fontana Chamber Arts

David Baldwin
Credit Fontana Chamber Arts

David Baldwin will draw on his experience in artist management at the highest level in New York and London and leadership of the Shriver Hall Concert Series in Baltimore to build on the history of Kalamazoo's premiere chamber music organization, Fontana Chamber Arts

He talks about his early training as a musician and how he parlayed it into concert management, helped in part by none other than Yo-Yo Ma. He also takes a practical attitude toward the realities of arts funding and planning for the future.

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Around the Nation
5:23 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Cooper Union Students Fight For Freedom From Tuition

An image of Cooper Union founder Peter Cooper is projected on the office of school President Jamshed Bharucha, in protest of the institution's decision to begin charging tuition.
Courtesy of The Illuminator

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

When students at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York took over the president's office one month ago to protest the school's decision to charge tuition, they painted the lobby black.

They also took a painting of the school's founder, and hung a piece of red fabric from the frame, as if Peter Cooper himself had joined in the protest.

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Music
4:39 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

The Creole Choir Of Cuba: Reviving Caribbean History In 'Santiman'

The Creole Choir of Cuba's latest album, Santiman, has a satisfying flow from celebration to solemnity.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

It might come as a surprise to learn that people of Haitian descent are the largest ethnic minority in Cuba. But that's the history behind The Creole Choir of Cuba, a vocal and percussion ensemble that performs songs about history, faith and social change in the Caribbean.

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Music Interviews
4:32 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Jason Isbell: A 'Southeastern' Songwriter's Path To Sobriety

Jason Isbell's new album is called Southeastern.
Michael Wilson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 12:07 pm

There are a few things worth knowing about singer-songwriter Jason Isbell: The round softness of his speech comes from his roots in rural Alabama. He has lyrics from a Bob Dylan song inked on his forearm.

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Shots - Health News
4:31 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Triple Threat: Middle East Respiratory Virus And 2 Bird Flus

Men outside a hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, wear surgical masks as a precaution against infection with a coronavirus.
Stringer Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:11 am

The World Health Organization is warning health care workers everywhere to suspect a disease called Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, whenever they see a case of unexplained pneumonia.

Monday's warning comes at the end of a six-day WHO investigation in Saudi Arabia, where 40 of the 55 cases of the respiratory disease have occurred. Sixty percent of those people with known infections died.

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