4:37 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Michigan bonds win higher rating

Lead in text: 
The change means the state, and taxpayers, will spend less on interest payments for borrowed money.
Lansing - The state of Michigan's financial image got a positive boost Tuesday by two Wall Street bond rating agencies, a reflection of the state's economic recovery and an end of years of structurally imbalanced state budgets. Fitch Ratings upgraded the state's general obligation bond rating to "AA" status, putting Michigan two steps away from the coveted AAA status.
4:20 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Poll: Right to Work doesn't affect Snyder's popularity

Lead in text: 
The survey found little change in the governor's public approval rating which has hovered around 35 percent.
LANSING - Support for Gov. Rick Snyder remains well below 50% but was not significantly affected by the controversy over right-to-work legislation he signed into law in December, according to a new survey from Michigan State University.
World
3:34 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Official On Deck To Succeed Castros Still A Question Mark To Many Cubans

Newly elected Cuban Vice President Miguel Diaz-Canel attends a tribute to the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez in March. Diaz-Canel is expected to eventually succeed Raul Castro as the island nation's leader in 2018.
Desmond Boylan Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:50 pm

Within 10 days of Miguel Diaz-Canel's big promotion to vice president of Cuba in February, he was already being tapped as a stand-in for reticent, 81-year-old President Raul Castro. It was Diaz-Canel, not Raul or Fidel Castro, who gave Cuba's first public condolences when the communist government lost its best friend and benefactor, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

Read more
Europe
3:34 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

A Renaissance For 'Pigsticking' In Spain

Ramiro Maura hunts wild boar at his ranch near Madrid in February.
Lauren Frayer NPR

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:50 pm

An ancient hunting ritual is making a comeback in modern Spain: the practice of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears — and no guns. The sport dates to Roman times, and was recently approved and added to Spanish hunting regulations.

Just a 20-minute drive from Spain's capital, you're in the dehesa — oak woodlands, where wild boar, deer and mountain goats roam. Madrid's skyscrapers are on the horizon, but in the forest, ancient traditions still reign.

Read more
Politics
2:19 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Second Chances In American Politics

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The president talks guns in Colorado. Hillary Clinton supporters talk 2016. And in New York City, six pols busted for talking turkey. It's Wednesday and time for a...

DAN HALLORAN: It's all about how much...

CONAN: ...edition of the political junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

Read more
Science
2:18 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

The Remarkable Biodiversity Of Belly Buttons

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
On Aging
2:11 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Isolation V. Loneliness: The Difference And Why It Matters

Researchers from University College London followed thousands of people over the age of 52 for seven to eight years to assess the effect of loneliness and isolation. Isolation, not loneliness, may actually shorten people's lives regardless of health or income.

2:07 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Tax foreclosures drop in Kalamazoo County

Lead in text: 
County officials say local and state programs that help homeowners keep their property are having an effect.
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The number of Kalamazoo County parcels that went into tax foreclosure Monday dropped about 36 percent from 2012. In the county, 221 parcels were foreclosed on this year because of unpaid property taxes from 2010 and prior years, Kalamazoo County Treasurer Mary Balkema said.
2:03 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

EPA Allied Paper landfill plan not popular

Lead in text: 
More than 100 people attended a public forum Tuesday night organized by the Kalamazoo River Cleanup Coalition. It opposes the EPA plan to keep PCB contamination at the site in place.
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Dustin Harback lives steps from the Allied Paper landfill site. His 11-year-old daughter and 8-year-old son go to Parkwood Upjohn Elementary School and his family drives by the landfill daily. Harback said he wanted to join "some people that want to be bold and change the community."
The Picture Show
1:45 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

You Can't Put A Headline On William Klein

Gun 1, New York, 1955
William Klein 'William Klein ABC'/Abrams

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:50 pm

Try to put him in a box and he'll find his way out. Still working at nearly 85 years old, William Klein has gone rogue in at least four different fields: abstract painting, photography, filmmaking and commercial copy writing.

Klein now lives in Paris but I caught up with him in New York City — the place where he was born, but no longer has much affinity for. He's just here to promote a new book, William Klein ABC.

When I ask him what he thinks about the city, he says:

Read more
WMUK News
1:39 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Blue-ribboned trees fight child abuse

"Blue Ribbon Tree" in downtown Kalamazoo
Credit Stella Chivikas / KCAN

The annual “Blue Ribbon Tree” campaign to fight child abuse and neglect in Kalamazoo County gets underway this week. It’s sponsored by the Kalamazoo County Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Council.

The Council’s Executive Director Karen Hayter says child abuse and neglect is a growing problem in the Kalamazoo area. She says the number of confirmed cases in the county has more than doubled since 2005. Hayter says more than 4,000 cases of abuse and neglect were reported to Child Protective Services in 2011 alone.

Read more
Arts & Life
1:38 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Poet Nikki Giovanni Tweets Home, Peace And West Virginia

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now the latest in our series, Muses and Metaphor. We are celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing your poetic tweets. You have already started sending us poems that are 140 characters or less. Yesterday, we kicked off this series with author, performer and our series curator, Holly Bass.

Read more
Beauty Shop
1:38 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Does Leaning In Actually Work For Women At The Starting Line?

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, the New York African Film Festival is getting under way. The festival is in its 20th year now, so we're going to talk about the stories being told by a new generation of African filmmakers. That's coming up.

Read more
Education
1:38 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

'Anger' In Atlanta As Cheating Scandal Investigated

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, we will bring you a poetic tweet. That's a poem of 140 characters or less, sent by none other than the celebrated Nikki Giovanni. It's part of our celebration of National Poetry Month, and we'll hear it in a few minutes and you'll find out how you can contribute, too, if you'd like. That's later.

Read more
Book Reviews
1:16 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

'Burgess Boys' Family Saga Explores The Authenticity Of Imperfection

iStockphoto.com

In 1846, Edgar Allan Poe wrote a famous essay called "The Philosophy of Composition," in which he sounds like an interior decorator. I say that because in the essay, Poe insists that all good writing must strive for what he calls "unity of effect." For Poe, it was important that everything in his short stories — characters, setting, narration — add up to one big "color-me-terrified" impact.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:09 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

A Father Tells The Story Of His Son's Struggle To Stay 'Clean'

iStockphoto.com

Why do we imprison people who are addicted to illegal drugs instead of treating them for their addiction? That question is at the heart of David Sheff's new book Clean: Overcoming Addiction and Ending America's Greatest Tragedy. It reports the latest medical and scientific research about addiction and recovery, which, Sheff says, shows that drug addicts are gravely ill, afflicted with a chronic, progressive and often terminal disease.

Read more
Television
1:04 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

This Spring, Rejoice At Rebirth Of 'Mad Men'

We won't give away any of the details about his personal life, but we can say that the two-hour season premiere of Mad Men shows Don Draper (Jon Hamm, right, with John Slattery's Roger Sterling) as his silver tongue fails him.
Frank Ockenfels AMC

For decades, when broadcast television called the shots and dominated the TV landscape, the biggest event of the year was "the fall season," when networks would unveil their new shows and return with fresh episodes of old favorites. But now, because of cable and satellite TV, the fall season isn't the only game in town.

Read more
SW Michigan
12:53 pm
Wed April 3, 2013

Judge says "Right to Work" lawsuit can continue

Protesters demonstrate against "Right to Work" (file photo)
Credit The Associated Press

A judge in Lansing says a lawsuit challenging Michigan’s “right to work” law can go ahead. The Gongwer News Service says Ingham County Circuit Judge William Collette issued the ruling Wednesday.

The suit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union and other “right to work” opponents says lawmakers broke the state’s Open Meetings Act when the legislature passed the law in December. That’s because the Republican majority temporarily closed the Capitol Building to people protesting the bill.

Read more
WMUK News
8:54 am
Wed April 3, 2013

K College gets first female board chairperson

Charlotte Hall and Don Parfet
Credit Kalamazoo College

Newspaper editor Charlotte Hall will become the first woman to head Kalamazoo College's Board of Trustees. Hall will take over from current board chairman Don Parfet in June.

Hall was an editor at several newspapers, including the Orlando Sentinel. She's also the chairwoman of the American Society of News Editors and is a visiting professor of journalism and Washington and Lee University.

Hall graduated from K College in 1966. She says her top priorities include enlarging the college's financial base and attracting more students.

Read more
Health Care
8:19 am
Wed April 3, 2013

White House Delays Part Of Health Care Law

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Obama administration is delaying the start of a key piece of the Affordable Care Act - the national healthcare law. Workers in small businesses will have to wait an additional year to be able to choose from more than one plan in the new online marketplace that start next January. NPR's Julie Rovner reports that the change might dampen enthusiasm, at least at the start. But not everyone thinks that's a bad thing.

Read more
Around the Nation
8:03 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Cold Snap Delays Maryland Crabbing Season

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Punxsutawney Phil has his counterpart in the average Maryland crab - except while Phil supposedly predicts the weather and this year missed a cold snap, Maryland crabs react in real time. This week was supposed to be the start of crabbing season but the chill in the Chesapeake has left the water too cold for the crabs to come out of the mud. It turns out this is extending their life spans - since it means watermen can't catch them. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

8:02 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Kalamazoo residents oppose EPA plan for contaminated landfill

Lead in text: 
More than a hundred people showed their opposition the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s plan for the Allied Paper Landfill site at a Kalamazoo meeting last night.
KALAMAZOO, MI -- Dustin Harback lives steps from the Allied Paper landfill site. His 11-year-old daughter and 8-year-old son go to Parkwood Upjohn Elementary School and his family drives by the landfill daily. Harback said he wanted to join "some people that want to be bold and change the community."
7:55 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Binder Park Zoo helps preserve endangered Mexican gray wolves

Lead in text: 
Through the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan program, Binder Park Zoo collected genetic material from the gray wolves for future breeding.
Future generations of Mexican gray wolves will be able to thank Binder Park Zoo for their existence.
7:53 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Citizens scrutinize safety of Palisade Nuclear Plant

Lead in text: 
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says the Palisades Nuclear Plant in South Haven operated safely in 2012, despite several leaks.
SOUTH HAVEN, MI -- Over 100 people turned out Tuesday night for a public meeting about the Palisades nuclear plant, some of them voicing concerns and asking questions regarding the condition of the plant's nuclear reactor, storage of nuclear waste and general plant safety.
Around the Nation
7:23 am
Wed April 3, 2013

911 Dispatcher Asks Her Mom To Rescue Kayaker

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Raedyn Grasseth might get the award for most creative 911 operator. The Washington state woman dispatched an officer to rescue a stranded kayaker on the Colombia River. The boater was in powerful currents, hanging onto a pile of logs. Grasseth had a feeling she might not be reached in time. And so, she called an experienced kayaker who happened to live nearby, her mother. The dispatcher's mom paddled out and within minutes brought the woman to safety.

Remembrances
6:26 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Remembering Robert Remini

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 9:20 am

A former House historian, prolific biographer and professor emeritus at the University of Illinois, Chicago, Robert Remini spent a lifetime exploring handwritten letters and other documents that illuminate the 19th century. He won a National Book Award for the three-volume The Life of Andrew Jackson.

Around the Nation
6:26 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Restaurants Take Risks For Big Rewards At Phoenix Airport

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If you travel a lot you're probably doing a lot of meals in airports, maybe fast-food by Gate C31 or the chain coffee place nearby. Well, one of the busiest airports in the country is now bringing in local restaurants.

As Peter O'Dowd reports from member station KJZZ in Phoenix, these small businesses are taking a risk for a shot at a big reward.

(SOUNDBITE OF MACHINERY)

Read more
Politics
4:34 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Outrage Alone Won't Advance Gun Control Measures

President Obama urged Congress to take action on measures to protect children from gun violence while speaking in the East Room of the White House last week. Standing with Obama are Vice President Joe Biden and, according to the White House, law enforcement officials, victims of gun violence and others, whom the White House did not want to name.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:42 am

President Obama is trying to regain some traction for federal gun control measures by visiting states that are moving forward on their own.

On Wednesday, the president speaks in Colorado, where lawmakers recently passed a series of bills requiring background checks for all gun purchases and limiting the size of ammunition magazines.

Obama would like to see similar measures adopted nationwide. But if Colorado serves as an inspiration for the president, it also provides a cautionary tale.

Read more
Tina Brown's Must-Reads
3:06 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Tina Brown's Must Reads: Women Vs. The World

Malala Yousafzai, targeted by the Taliban for her advocacy in favor of education for girls and young women in her native Pakistan, will be honored at the opening night of Tina Brown's Women in the World Summit.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 9:39 am

Tina Brown, editor of the Daily Beast and Newsweek, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for an occasional feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. She talks about what she's been reading and offers recommendations.

This month, as Brown prepares for her annual Women in the World Summit in New York City, her reading suggestions address just that: the role of women in the developing world.

Malala And The Media

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:04 am
Wed April 3, 2013

In South Jersey, New Options For Primary Care Are Slow To Take Hold

Dr. Madhumathi Gunasekaran examines John Pike at the Northgate II clinic in Camden, N.J.
Emma Lee

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Camden, N.J., has serious health problems, with too many people going to local emergency rooms unnecessarily. But progress is being made, albeit slowly.

John Pike, 53, is a Camden resident who used to be a frequent flier at the ER.

Pike has a smoker's cough, and when that cough or pain in his bad hip flared up, he'd go to the ER — maybe eight or nine times a year. But when he did, ER staffers didn't really remember him or his medical history.

Read more

Pages