Movie Interviews
10:03 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Cristian Mungiu: Metaphor Or Not, 'Hills' Has Eyes For Romania's Past

Director Cristian Mungiu on the set of his new film, Beyond the Hills. As in his earlier 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, the filmmaker focuses on two young women adrift in the post-Soviet wilderness of Romania.
Sundance Selects

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 6:28 pm

Cristian Mungiu became the poster boy for the Romanian New Wave when his film 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days took the top prize at the Cannes International Film Festival in 2007. Like that film, Mungiu's latest turns an unblinking camera on two troubled young women in a dysfunctional society. Beyond the Hills is now opening in theaters across the U.S.

Like its predecessor, Beyond the Hills was a prizewinner at Cannes: Its two young stars shared the best actress prize last year, and Mungiu won best screenplay.

The story he tells is disturbing.

Read more
Brooke Gladstone
9:14 am
Sun March 31, 2013

Brooke Gladstone "On the Media" in Kalamazoo

One of Brooke Gladstone's Avatars from her book
Credit W.W. Norton & Company

Brooke Gladstone says the title of her book The Influencing Machine really means the opposite of what she’s saying. The host of the NPR program On the Media says people think of the media as something that influences them, but she says the media really does its best to appeal to its audience rather than to manipulate. Gladstone will speak at Western Michigan University Tuesday night at 7:00 in Knauss Hall.

Read more
Health Care
5:35 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

Three Years On, States Still Struggle With Health Care Law Messaging

Joy Reynolds of San Diego looks at the newspapers on display at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., on June 29, 2012, following the Supreme Court ruling on President Obama's health care law.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 6:25 pm

It is hard to imagine that after three years of acrimony and debate we could still be so confused about President Obama's Affordable Care Act.

Is it actually possible Americans know less about Obamacare now than they did three years ago? Apparently that is the case, and the news comes just as the most sweeping effects of the law are about to kick in.

Read more

Jessica Jones covers both the legislature in Raleigh and politics across the state. Before her current assignment, Jessica was given the responsibility to open up WUNC's first Greensboro Bureau at the Triad Stage in 2009. She's a seasoned public radio reporter who's covered everything from education to immigration, and she's a regular contributor to NPR's news programs. Jessica started her career in journalism in Egypt, where she freelanced for international print and radio outlets. After stints in Washington, D.C. with Voice of America and NPR, Jessica joined the staff of WUNC in 1999. She is a graduate of Yale University.

Remembrances
4:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

Remembering Legendary Music Producer Phil Ramone

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 6:25 pm

Music producer Phil Ramone, who worked on albums by Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Stan Getz and Joao Gilberto, has died at the age of 72. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan looks back at some of the huge records that benefitted from his magic touch.

Business
4:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

How Samsung Became An Industry Giant

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 6:25 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

If you're just joining us, you're listening to WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

Quick trivia question: Name a global superpower technology company, that is the world's biggest seller of smartphones headed by a charismatic CEO surrounded by a cult of personality. I'm guessing most of you just said Apple, right? You would be wrong. The answer is Samsung.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Sat March 30, 2013

For One Military Family, DOMA Decision Will Hit Close To Home

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 6:25 pm

Same-sex couples in the military will be watching closely now that the U.S. Supreme Court is considering the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act. Anxiously awaiting a decision are Army lieutenant colonel Heather Mack and her wife, Ashley Broadway, who've been together for 15 years and have two children. They say repealing DOMA would help many enlisted same-sex military couples, who don't receive funds to move non-military spouses from one base to the next.

Space
9:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

Studying Rocks Found On Earth For Clues About Space

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

For the rest of the hour, we're going to talk about meteorites. They are more than just a chunk of rock. They can be a time capsule, or ancient secrets of our solar system may be locked up in its core. And it turns out - I didn't know this - that one of the largest meteorite collections, the largest one, the largest collection held by any university is just up the road from us in Tempe. And joining us now to talk about the collection is Meenakshi Wadhwa.

Read more
Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat March 30, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Chris Hayes And 'Room 237'

Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell have been friends and collaborators since the 1970s. Their new album together is called Old Yellow Moon.
David McClister Nonesuch Records

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 11:51 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Read more
Sports
8:16 am
Sat March 30, 2013

Elite 8 Take To The NCAA Courts

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Know why I am hoarse? Because it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

SIMON: All that cheering. Florida Gulf Coast Eagles got eaten by the Gators yesterday, but the Cardinals are still flying high. Louisville, Florida, Michigan and Duke move on to men's college basketball Elite 8; and baseball season opens tomorrow when the Texas Rangers face the Houston Astros.

We're now joined by Howard Bryant, of ESPN.com and ESPN the Magazine. Good morning, Howard.

Read more
Arts & Life
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

A Fossilized Confection Baked For Easter 1807

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

A British couple believes they've come across a hot cross bun that was baked more than 200 years ago. Host Scott Simon explains.

Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

Gay Marriage Recap: Will Justices Rule On Constitutionality?

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon and we'll have to wait until June to learn what the U.S. Supreme Court has decided on the two gay marriage cases before it. But this week, the justices heard oral arguments and they gave perhaps some hints of their thinking. One case concerns the constitutionality of California's ban on gay marriage, the other case is a challenge to what's called DOMA, the Defense of Marriage Act.

We're joined now by NPR legal affairs correspondent, Nina Totenberg. Thanks for being with us.

Read more
Europe
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

German Anti-Euro Group Has Big-Name Backers

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 1

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:26 am

The Sonoran Desert, which spans some 100,000 square miles in southwestern North America, is one of the most diverse desert ecosystems in the world. Host Ira Flatow and guests discuss some lesser known desert creatures, and explore the secret life of that American southwest icon, the saguaro cactus.

NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 3

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:19 am

When does a story about science become science fiction? Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss and theoretical physicist Brian Greene discuss how to spin a yarn about string theory or the Big Bang, without hyping the science. And novelist Ian McEwan, whose books touch on neurosurgery and quantum field theory, talks about what science offers to fiction.

NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 2

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

You're listening to SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. And for the rest of the hour we're going to talk about collisions, space collisions, space impacts, with Erik Asphaug, who's Ronald Greeley chair of planetary geology, School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. Welcome to SCIENCE FRIDAY.

ERIK ASPHAUG: Thanks very much, Ira.

FLATOW: You must be very busy since this last collision in Russia of this asteroid.

Read more
Movie Reviews
5:42 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

A Film So Sumptuous, 'Renoir' Himself Might Have Helped Out

Jean (Vincent Rottiers) assists his ailing father, the artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet), in his studio on the French Riviera.
Samuel Goldwyn Films

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 7:55 pm

The year is 1915. A beautiful young woman bicycling through sun-dappled woods passes under an effigy of a German soldier and seems entirely unfazed. World War I is raging elsewhere in Europe, but here on the French Riviera life is serene.

The cyclist, Andree, is on her way to pose for an elderly Impressionist painter, Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet), whom she somewhat startles by claiming to be an artist herself.

"An artist," wonders the great man.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:18 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 11:15 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with P. J. O'Rourke, Kyrie O'Connor, and Adam Felber. And, here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, and filling in for Peter Sagal, Tom Bodett.

(APPLAUSE)

TOM BODETT, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. In just a minute, Carl leaves the rhyme on for you at Motel Limericks in our listener limerick challenge. Let me do that again, I don't think you heard it.

(LAUGHTER)

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:18 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Who's Carl This Time?

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 11:15 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, filling in for Drew Carey filling in for Peter Sagal, Tom Bodett.

TOM BODETT, HOST:

Thank you Carl.

(APPLAUSE)

BODETT: Wow. Those are some big - and numerous - shoes to fill. And by the end of the show those shoes will be fuller than a preacher's pockets at a Sunday picnic. And by that I mean what, Carl?

KASELL: No clue, Tom.

(LAUGHTER)

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:18 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 11:15 am

Transcript

TOM BODETT, HOST:

Now, panel, how will that teenager blow his 30 million? P. J. O'Rourke?

P. J. O'ROURKE: Well, 30 million is about what college education costs for a kid these days. So he's going to spend it to get a college education so he can get a good job.

BODETT: Kyrie O'Connor?

KYRIE O'CONNOR: He's going to blow it on cars he can't drive, women he can't date and liquor he can't drink.

BODETT: And Adam Felber?

ADAM FELBER: He's going to wait two years and then he's going to buy Yahoo.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

Read more
Architecture
4:36 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Self-Taught Architect Behind Brooklyn's 'Broken Angel' Faces Eviction

Over the past three decades, Arthur and Cynthia Wood turned their four-story home into a work of art. They purchased the brick tenement at the intersection of Downing and Quincy streets in 1979 for $2,100 in cash.
Courtesy of Chris Wood

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 7:55 pm

A New York landmark of sorts is in danger of being wiped off the map. The building now known as Broken Angel was an ordinary 19th-century brick structure until self-taught artist and sculptor Arthur Wood started building on top of it in the late 1970s. Now Wood faces eviction from his own masterpiece — a towering structure that looks like a cathedral built out of salvaged junk.

Read more
Economy
4:32 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

As Housing Industry Builds Up, Other Sectors Follow

Home Depot is hiring 80,000 employees for its spring season. As the housing market picks up, other industry sectors — like gardening, construction and furniture — move upward, too.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:31 pm

When fortunes rise in the housing industry — as they currently are — it tends to lift sales for other businesses, too. Home construction, sales and prices are all improving. And according to many analysts, the market is gaining steam.

For nearly two decades, Scott Gillis has owned his own moving company, Great Scott Moving in Hyattsville, Md. Moving high season is just around the corner, which means Gillis is hiring.

Read more
Africa
4:24 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Western Money, African Boots: A Formula For Africa's Conflicts

Ugandan soldiers serving with the African Union Mission in Somalia prepare to advance on the central Somali town of Buur-Hakba.
Stuart Price AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 7:55 pm

For the past six years in Somalia, Western countries have been putting up the cash and African nations have been supplying the soldiers, a formula that has pushed back al-Qaida-linked militants and allowed Somalia to elect it's first democratic government in 20 years.

"We can fix our problems in Africa," says Brig. Michael Ondoga, a contingent commander with the African Union Mission in Somalia or AMISOM. "All we need is your support."

It's not at all hard to see why this plan is so agreeable to the American government.

Read more
Movie Reviews
12:58 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Hunting For Secrets In 'The Shining's' Room 237

Rodney Ascher, director of the experimental documentary Room 237, leads an exploration of differing interpretations of Stanley Kubrick's classic horror film The Shining.
IFC Midnight

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 2:05 pm

Awhile back, I went to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to see its show on filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. It was jammed with visitors poring over his letters, eyeing the dresses worn by the spooky twins in The Shining, and posing for photos in front of the sexy-futuristic decor of the Korova Milk Bar from A Clockwork Orange.

Read more
Local Music
12:30 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Pianist Jeremy Siskind presents classics, improvisations

Jeremy Siskind
Credit Gerry Szymanski

One of the major young voices in jazz piano, Jeremy Siskind will present a solo faculty recital tonight at Western Michigan University which combines inspired pairings of works by composers from Rachmaninoff to Dizzy Gillespie in the first half.  

Read more

Jazz Currents

Keith Hall hosts an hour of jazz from the campus of Western Michigan University.

Barbershop
11:59 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Should Jane Be Allowed To Marry Jane?

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 12:39 pm

The Supreme Court heard arguments over same-sex marriage this week, and the Barbershop guys have their own arguments to offer. Guest host Celeste Headlee checks in with culture critic Jimi Izrael, sports writer Pablo Torre, Kai Wright of Colorlines.com, and Republican strategist R. Clarke Cooper.

NPR Story
11:59 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Refugees Creating 'Instant Cities' Across Syrian Borders

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 12:39 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Passover is in full swing and Easter is just days away. And Pati Jinich joins us. She'll tell you how to put a Mexican touch on your holiday feast. But first we turn to Syria. Reports out of the Middle East say rebels have captured a key strategic town near the Jordanian border, but while the fighting continues into its third year, more and more Syrians are trying to flee the country.

Read more
NPR Story
11:59 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Creating Church Music: You've Got To Feel It

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

It's Good Friday, so let's stay with the theme of Easter celebrations. Today, we hear from a woman whose life changed when she volunteered to help plan a simple Easter program for her church in Memphis, Tenn. Earnestine Rodgers Robinson had no musical training, but perhaps by divine intervention, her decision to volunteer actually set her on the path to a career composing classical music.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:55 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Sand From Fracking Could Pose Lung Disease Risk To Workers

A worker stands on top of a storage bin on July 27, 2011, at a drilling operation in Claysville, Pa. The dust is from powder mixed with water for hydraulic fracturing.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:50 pm

When workplace safety expert Eric Esswein got a chance to see fracking in action not too long ago, what he noticed was all the dust.

It was coming off big machines used to haul around huge loads of sand. The sand is a critical part of the hydraulic fracturing method of oil and gas extraction. After workers drill down into rock, they create fractures in that rock by pumping in a mixture of water, chemicals and sand. The sand keeps the cracks propped open so that oil and gas are released.

Read more

Pages