Arts & Life
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

A Fossilized Confection Baked For Easter 1807

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

A British couple believes they've come across a hot cross bun that was baked more than 200 years ago. Host Scott Simon explains.

Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

Gay Marriage Recap: Will Justices Rule On Constitutionality?

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon and we'll have to wait until June to learn what the U.S. Supreme Court has decided on the two gay marriage cases before it. But this week, the justices heard oral arguments and they gave perhaps some hints of their thinking. One case concerns the constitutionality of California's ban on gay marriage, the other case is a challenge to what's called DOMA, the Defense of Marriage Act.

We're joined now by NPR legal affairs correspondent, Nina Totenberg. Thanks for being with us.

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Europe
6:11 am
Sat March 30, 2013

German Anti-Euro Group Has Big-Name Backers

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 10:34 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 1

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:26 am

The Sonoran Desert, which spans some 100,000 square miles in southwestern North America, is one of the most diverse desert ecosystems in the world. Host Ira Flatow and guests discuss some lesser known desert creatures, and explore the secret life of that American southwest icon, the saguaro cactus.

NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 3

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:19 am

When does a story about science become science fiction? Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss and theoretical physicist Brian Greene discuss how to spin a yarn about string theory or the Big Bang, without hyping the science. And novelist Ian McEwan, whose books touch on neurosurgery and quantum field theory, talks about what science offers to fiction.

NPR Story
9:02 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Segment 2

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

You're listening to SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. And for the rest of the hour we're going to talk about collisions, space collisions, space impacts, with Erik Asphaug, who's Ronald Greeley chair of planetary geology, School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. Welcome to SCIENCE FRIDAY.

ERIK ASPHAUG: Thanks very much, Ira.

FLATOW: You must be very busy since this last collision in Russia of this asteroid.

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Movie Reviews
5:42 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

A Film So Sumptuous, 'Renoir' Himself Might Have Helped Out

Jean (Vincent Rottiers) assists his ailing father, the artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet), in his studio on the French Riviera.
Samuel Goldwyn Films

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 7:55 pm

The year is 1915. A beautiful young woman bicycling through sun-dappled woods passes under an effigy of a German soldier and seems entirely unfazed. World War I is raging elsewhere in Europe, but here on the French Riviera life is serene.

The cyclist, Andree, is on her way to pose for an elderly Impressionist painter, Pierre-Auguste Renoir (Michel Bouquet), whom she somewhat startles by claiming to be an artist herself.

"An artist," wonders the great man.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:18 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 11:15 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with P. J. O'Rourke, Kyrie O'Connor, and Adam Felber. And, here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, and filling in for Peter Sagal, Tom Bodett.

(APPLAUSE)

TOM BODETT, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. In just a minute, Carl leaves the rhyme on for you at Motel Limericks in our listener limerick challenge. Let me do that again, I don't think you heard it.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:18 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Who's Carl This Time?

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 11:15 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, filling in for Drew Carey filling in for Peter Sagal, Tom Bodett.

TOM BODETT, HOST:

Thank you Carl.

(APPLAUSE)

BODETT: Wow. Those are some big - and numerous - shoes to fill. And by the end of the show those shoes will be fuller than a preacher's pockets at a Sunday picnic. And by that I mean what, Carl?

KASELL: No clue, Tom.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:18 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 11:15 am

Transcript

TOM BODETT, HOST:

Now, panel, how will that teenager blow his 30 million? P. J. O'Rourke?

P. J. O'ROURKE: Well, 30 million is about what college education costs for a kid these days. So he's going to spend it to get a college education so he can get a good job.

BODETT: Kyrie O'Connor?

KYRIE O'CONNOR: He's going to blow it on cars he can't drive, women he can't date and liquor he can't drink.

BODETT: And Adam Felber?

ADAM FELBER: He's going to wait two years and then he's going to buy Yahoo.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

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Architecture
4:36 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Self-Taught Architect Behind Brooklyn's 'Broken Angel' Faces Eviction

Over the past three decades, Arthur and Cynthia Wood turned their four-story home into a work of art. They purchased the brick tenement at the intersection of Downing and Quincy streets in 1979 for $2,100 in cash.
Courtesy of Chris Wood

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 7:55 pm

A New York landmark of sorts is in danger of being wiped off the map. The building now known as Broken Angel was an ordinary 19th-century brick structure until self-taught artist and sculptor Arthur Wood started building on top of it in the late 1970s. Now Wood faces eviction from his own masterpiece — a towering structure that looks like a cathedral built out of salvaged junk.

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Economy
4:32 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

As Housing Industry Builds Up, Other Sectors Follow

Home Depot is hiring 80,000 employees for its spring season. As the housing market picks up, other industry sectors — like gardening, construction and furniture — move upward, too.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:31 pm

When fortunes rise in the housing industry — as they currently are — it tends to lift sales for other businesses, too. Home construction, sales and prices are all improving. And according to many analysts, the market is gaining steam.

For nearly two decades, Scott Gillis has owned his own moving company, Great Scott Moving in Hyattsville, Md. Moving high season is just around the corner, which means Gillis is hiring.

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Africa
4:24 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Western Money, African Boots: A Formula For Africa's Conflicts

Ugandan soldiers serving with the African Union Mission in Somalia prepare to advance on the central Somali town of Buur-Hakba.
Stuart Price AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 7:55 pm

For the past six years in Somalia, Western countries have been putting up the cash and African nations have been supplying the soldiers, a formula that has pushed back al-Qaida-linked militants and allowed Somalia to elect it's first democratic government in 20 years.

"We can fix our problems in Africa," says Brig. Michael Ondoga, a contingent commander with the African Union Mission in Somalia or AMISOM. "All we need is your support."

It's not at all hard to see why this plan is so agreeable to the American government.

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Movie Reviews
12:58 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Hunting For Secrets In 'The Shining's' Room 237

Rodney Ascher, director of the experimental documentary Room 237, leads an exploration of differing interpretations of Stanley Kubrick's classic horror film The Shining.
IFC Midnight

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 2:05 pm

Awhile back, I went to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to see its show on filmmaker Stanley Kubrick. It was jammed with visitors poring over his letters, eyeing the dresses worn by the spooky twins in The Shining, and posing for photos in front of the sexy-futuristic decor of the Korova Milk Bar from A Clockwork Orange.

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Local Music
12:30 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Pianist Jeremy Siskind presents classics, improvisations

Jeremy Siskind
Credit Gerry Szymanski

One of the major young voices in jazz piano, Jeremy Siskind will present a solo faculty recital tonight at Western Michigan University which combines inspired pairings of works by composers from Rachmaninoff to Dizzy Gillespie in the first half.  

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Jazz Currents

Keith Hall hosts an hour of jazz from the campus of Western Michigan University.

Barbershop
11:59 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Should Jane Be Allowed To Marry Jane?

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 12:39 pm

The Supreme Court heard arguments over same-sex marriage this week, and the Barbershop guys have their own arguments to offer. Guest host Celeste Headlee checks in with culture critic Jimi Izrael, sports writer Pablo Torre, Kai Wright of Colorlines.com, and Republican strategist R. Clarke Cooper.

NPR Story
11:59 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Refugees Creating 'Instant Cities' Across Syrian Borders

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 12:39 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Passover is in full swing and Easter is just days away. And Pati Jinich joins us. She'll tell you how to put a Mexican touch on your holiday feast. But first we turn to Syria. Reports out of the Middle East say rebels have captured a key strategic town near the Jordanian border, but while the fighting continues into its third year, more and more Syrians are trying to flee the country.

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NPR Story
11:59 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Creating Church Music: You've Got To Feel It

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:01 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

It's Good Friday, so let's stay with the theme of Easter celebrations. Today, we hear from a woman whose life changed when she volunteered to help plan a simple Easter program for her church in Memphis, Tenn. Earnestine Rodgers Robinson had no musical training, but perhaps by divine intervention, her decision to volunteer actually set her on the path to a career composing classical music.

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Shots - Health News
11:55 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Sand From Fracking Could Pose Lung Disease Risk To Workers

A worker stands on top of a storage bin on July 27, 2011, at a drilling operation in Claysville, Pa. The dust is from powder mixed with water for hydraulic fracturing.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:50 pm

When workplace safety expert Eric Esswein got a chance to see fracking in action not too long ago, what he noticed was all the dust.

It was coming off big machines used to haul around huge loads of sand. The sand is a critical part of the hydraulic fracturing method of oil and gas extraction. After workers drill down into rock, they create fractures in that rock by pumping in a mixture of water, chemicals and sand. The sand keeps the cracks propped open so that oil and gas are released.

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BackStory

BackStory is a public radio program & podcast that brings historical perspective to the events happening around us today. On each show, renowned U.S. historians Ed Ayers, Peter Onuf, and Brian Balogh tear a topic from the headlines and plumb its historical depths. Over the course of the hour, they are joined by fellow historians, people in the news, and callers interested in exploring the roots of what’s going on today. Together, they drill down to colonial times and earlier, revealing the connections between past and present.

11:03 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Poll: Michiganders divided on "right to work" law

Lead in text: 
The poll finds that the number of people who believe it will help is roughly equal to the number who say it will hurt the economy.
East Lansing - Michigan became the nation's 24th right-to-work state Thursday, but its residents remain deeply divided over whether the law will help or hinder the economy, according to a Michigan State University survey released Thursday.
10:58 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Snyder moves forward on "right to work"

Lead in text: 
The head of the Michigan Nurses Association says, "The People will outlast the law", as union leaders vow to continue fighting "right to work".
Gov. Rick Snyder called for "a chance to move forward" Thursday as union officials held a series of protests in Metro Detroit and Lansing as the traditional labor stronghold became the nation's 24th right-to-work state. Republicans and conservative supporters said giving employees the legal right not to pay dues to unions for collectively bargained wages and benefits would strengthen unions and benefit workers.
10:54 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Kildee: Sequester will hurt Michigan for years

Lead in text: 
Kildee says the problem could be offset by raising $500 billion over the next decade by closing tax loopholes and ending some tax breaks.
Michigan families will continue to feel the effects of $85 billion in across-the-board spending cuts for years if Congress doesn't act to repeal them, U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint, said Thursday. "These cuts are wrong for America and they're wrong for Michigan," Kildee said.
Media
10:50 am
Fri March 29, 2013

NPR To Drop Call-In Show 'Talk Of The Nation'

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. This morning we have news about our own network, word that TALK OF THE NATION, the daily call-in show broadcast by NPR for the last 21 years, will go off the air this summer. TALK OF THE NATION will be replaced by an expanded version of the news magazine HERE AND NOW. That's currently produced by member station WBUR in Boston, which will continue to produce it in partnership with NPR.

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Movie Interviews
10:36 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Frank Langella: A Career 'Like A Chekhov Play'

Frank Langella, who earned an Oscar nomination for his portrayal of Richard Nixon in Frost/Nixon, stars in the film Robot & Frank, about an aging ex-burglar. He says he was drawn to the unsentimental role.
Joe Fornabaio

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 2:03 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Aug. 16, 2012.

Frank Langella's career has not been an upward trajectory of success — and he likes it that way. He's had memorable roles on stage and screen, and times when he couldn't find work, or even an agent.

Now 75, Langella tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, he's never been hungrier to act.

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WMUK News
8:11 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Upton: immigration reform this summer

Immigration reform rally in Miami, Jan. 2013
Credit Alan Diaz / AP Photo

A bi-partisan group of senators in Washington called the “Gang of Eight” is expected to unveil an immigration reform plan early next month. Immigrant advocates hope it will include a “pathway to citizenship” for many of those in the country without documents. Some of those advocates rallied outside the Kalamazoo office of Congressman Fred Upton (R-Saint Joseph) on Good Friday.

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Europe
7:51 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Belgian Post Office Sells Chocolate-Flavored Stamps

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The Belgian post office released chocolate-flavored stamps just in time for Easter. The glue in the stamps is infused with cacao oil. A celebratory touch that makes sense, given Belgium is famous for its chocolate. One stamp collector sniffed the chocolate flavor was disappointing, but come on, wouldn't anything taste better than regular stamps? We on this morning show are now hoping for Belgian waffle-flavored envelopes. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:26 am
Fri March 29, 2013

Disc Jockey Gets Tattoo After Florida Gulf Coast Win

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 11:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

March Madness is a fixture in the United States and now on one radio host's upper arm. Florida DJ Big Mama wanted the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles to win so badly, he promised on air to get a tattoo if they beat Georgetown. Big Mama is a man of his word. He posted photos of his Eagles tattoo online.

I'll tell you what: If Florida Gulf Coast wins again tonight, I'll sing their fight song on air Monday. Steve Inskeep will be back - maybe a duet?

7:11 am
Fri March 29, 2013

FBI probe of Battle Creek police sought

Lead in text: 
Commissioner Jeffrey Domenico has not released details of his allegations of wrongdoing by the police department.
Battle Creek Police Chief Jackie Hampton said Thursday he is seeking an FBI probe of his department in light of allegations of wrongdoing made by a city commissioner. Commissioner Jeffrey Domenico formally requested an investigation of corruption in the department by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette; when the request was denied, Domenico went to Michigan State Police, who have not responded to his complaint.

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