Around the Nation
6:49 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Petition Calls On Congress To Dress Like NASCAR Drivers

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:44 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Town Board In N.Y. Revises Booing Ban

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Lawmakers in Riverhead, New York heard the voice of the people, a very loud boo. The town board made news by banning people from booing at meetings, which apparently met with criticism since Newsday reports they have revised the rule. You may boo at meetings now, but there is still a prohibition against disruptive behavior. So, how to boo without being disruptive? Maybe this way: Wait your turn to speak and then say: My name is Steve. Boo?

5:54 am
Fri March 22, 2013

House approves bill to expand school reform district

Lead in text: 
Bill now goes to Senate Education Committee
The state House passed a bill Thursday that would cap the number of schools in the state reform school district at 50 but allow some low-performing schools to be exempted from being placed in it.
5:50 am
Fri March 22, 2013

State Senate committee approves bill that allows health care workers to opt out based on conscience

Lead in text: 
Michigan Catholic Conference among bill's supporters. Long list of health care groups oppose legislation
Lansing - The Senate Health Policy Committee approved a "medical conscience" bill allowing health care workers to opt out of treatments that violate their personal beliefs and employers to bypass the Obama administration's contraception mandate. A long list of health-related groups opposes the bill, sponsored by Republican Sen.
5:40 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Holland City Council accepts public safety plan

Lead in text: 
Vote on Wednesday follows four years of study, maintains current staffing levels for police and fire
With little fanfare the Holland City Council accepted Wednesday the recommendations of the Public Safety Service Delivery Report.
5:30 am
Fri March 22, 2013

WMU grad, Iraq veteran, working for veterans rights

Lead in text: 
Ann Gaudard Weeby working to ease the backlog of veterans' disability cases.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Ten years ago Thursday, Ann Gaudard Weeby was getting ready to deploy to Iraq. Today, the former specialist is in Washington, D.C., campaigning for veterans' rights.
Around the Nation
4:31 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Kids' Voices Key On Both Sides Of Gay-Marriage Debate

The Rev. Gene Robinson, along with his daughter Ella and partner Mark Andrew, attend a news conference after Robinson was confirmed as bishop of the Episcopal Church in Minneapolis in 2003. Robinson was the church's first openly gay bishop, and his daughter is an advocate for gay marriage.
Eric Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 3:21 pm

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Middle East
4:31 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Obama Asks Young Israelis To Push For Mideast Peace

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:24 am

President Obama is urging both Israelis and Palestinians not to abandon long-stalled peace talks. The president has been practicing some low-key shuttle diplomacy this week.

Iraq
4:31 am
Fri March 22, 2013

'Tiny Fraction' Took Advantage During Iraq's Reconstruction

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

All this week on MORNING EDITION, we've been marking the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. That invasion was followed by years of war and reconstruction, the war and reconstruction taking place at the same time.

And today, to get a better idea of the monetary costs, we speak with Stuart Bowen once again. Since 2004, he has been the Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction. And earlier this month, he released the final report from his office.

Stuart Bowen is in Baghdad. Welcome back to the program.

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Research News
3:02 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Mosh Pit Math: Physicists Analyze Rowdy Crowd

Fans in the mosh pit during the performance of Liturgy at the 2012 Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park, Chicago, on July 14, 2012.
Roger Kisby Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

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Movies
3:01 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Not Doing So 'Boffo,' 'Daily Variety' Drops Print Edition

Print versions of Daily Variety, like this one from 2003, will no longer be available on L.A. newsstands. Variety will continue online and in a print weekly, but the daily print edition is being dropped.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

For eight decades, Daily Variety has been a Hollywood must-read for everyone from studio heads to actors looking for a big break. But the days of assistants running out to grab the "trades" are over: This week, the Los Angeles institution published its last daily edition.

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Business
3:00 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Google's Eric Schmidt Heads To Another Isolated Asian Nation

Eric Schmidt, Google's executive chairman and former CEO, stands near a statue of the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang in January. He's headed now to Myanmar, another largely untapped market.
David Guttenfelder AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Google's executive chairman, Eric Schmidt, who went to North Korea in January, is making a short visit Friday to Myanmar, also known as Burma.

Why is the senior executive of a U.S. technology powerhouse visiting some of the poorest and least wired countries in Asia?

Schmidt will be the first top U.S. executive to travel to the Southeast Asian nation since it began emerging from decades of international isolation under a military dictatorship.

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StoryCorps
2:01 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Living And Loving Through The Bubonic Plague

John Tull, 63, and Lucinda Marker, 57, survived a bout of the bubonic plague in 2002.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

The bubonic plague killed about one-third of Europe's population during the Middle Ages, but today the bacterial infection rarely shows up in the U.S. Only a handful of people catch it each year.

But in 2002, Lucinda Marker and her husband, John Tull, were bitten by fleas infected with the plague near their home in New Mexico. They then took a trip to New York City.

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Movie Interviews
12:03 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Tina Fey, Movie Star? Not Quite Yet, She Says

Tina Fey stars as Princeton University admissions counselor Portia Nathan in the new comedy Admission. Fey says the movie's frankly manic depiction of the college application melee appealed to her.
David Lee Focus Features

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 10:55 am

Writer, actor and producer Tina Fey stars in a new movie out today called Admission, a film that's nominally about getting into college. Fey plays an admissions officer at Princeton University, one of those diligent bureaucrats who cull thousands of applications in search of a small cadre of brilliant young people who will be the freshman class.

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8:16 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Enbridge says cost of cleaning up Kalamazoo River oil spill near $1-billion

Lead in text: 
EPA ordered additional clean up last week of area near Marshall where pipeline burst in 2010
Last week's dredging order by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will push Enbridge's cleanup costs for the July 2010 spill close to $1 billion, the company said Wednesday. Enbridge Energy Partners LP said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that the EPA order will cost the company $175 million and "financial statement recognition for this incident will cause increased volatility in the Partnership's results of operations and cash flows."
Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship
7:00 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

On Gun Ownership And Policy, 'A Country Of Chasms'

Gun enthusiast Paul Gwaltney at Blue Ridge Arsenal, in Chantilly, Va. Gwaltney, an NPR listener, agreed to host a discussion about guns with friends and colleagues.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 7:55 pm

The ideological gulf between gun owners and non-gun owners is a wide one — made all the more obvious by the ongoing debate over what, if any, gun control measures should be adopted in the U.S.

Sometimes, the debate feels like people are coming from different worlds, even for people within the same family. And while Americans are often willing to discuss their own views, it's rarer to hear conversations between people who own and love guns and those who do not.

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It's All Politics
6:32 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

NRA-Driven Gun Provisions Pass Along With Spending Bill

Customers shop for guns at Freddie Bear Sports sporting goods store in Tinley Park, Ill., in January. One of the gun provisions in the spending bill prevents the Justice Department from requiring gun dealers to conduct an inventory to see if guns are lost or stolen.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The House voted overwhelmingly Thursday to approve a temporary measure to keep the government funded through the end of September. Government shutdown averted.

But it turns out the continuing resolution didn't just address spending. It contains six measures that limit how federal agencies deal with guns.

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Middle East
6:21 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Face To Face With Death In Iraq

Residents visit the tomb of a loved one at the New Kerbala cemetery in the holy city of Kerbala, Iraq, in 2007.
Mushtaq Muhammad Reuters /Landov

On the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, NPR is catching up with some of the people we encountered during the war. In 2006, at the height of the violence, we brought you the story of a woman who performed the Muslim ritual of washing and preparing the dead for burial. Kelly McEvers has this update on Um Abbas, who is now living in southern Iraq.

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Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
4:37 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Meet The 83-Year-Old Taking On The U.S. Over Same-Sex Marriage

Edith Windsor in her New York City apartment in December 2012. Next week, the U.S. Supreme Court hears her challenge to the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 8:34 pm

The tiny dynamo asking the U.S. Supreme Court to turn the world upside down looks nothing like a fearless pioneer. At age 83, Edith Windsor dresses in classic, tailored clothes, usually with a long string of pearls, and she sports a well-coiffed, shoulder-length flip. She looks, for all the world, like a proper New York City lady.

Proper she may be, and a lady, but Windsor, who likes to be called Edie, is making history, challenging the federal Defense of Marriage Act, known as DOMA. The law bans federal recognition and benefits for legally married same-sex couples.

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Around the Nation
4:27 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Florida Pitches New Facilities To Clinch Spring Training

Baseball fans watch an exhibition spring training game between the Washington Nationals and the New York Mets in Port St. Lucie, Fla. Spring training contributes $35 million to the local economy.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 6:00 pm

For baseball fans, spring training is a time for renewed hopes and a reminder that winter is almost over. But for the major league teams and Arizona and Florida communities, spring training is big business. In Florida, 1.5 million fans attend spring training games with an estimated $750 million annual economic impact, and the state is working to keep the teams from fleeing.

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NPR Story
2:11 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

With Limited Resources, High Poverty, Turning Schools Around

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 4:46 pm

How much can you change a school in one academic year? That question threads through the PBS special 180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School. The documentary, which premieres March 25, follows the day-to-day struggles facing the administrators, teachers and students at Washington Metropolitan High School, an alternative school in Washington, D.C.

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Environment
2:10 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

'Temperature Rising': Will Climate Change Bring More Extreme Weather?

The Star Jet roller coaster sits in the water on Feb. 19 after the Casino Pier in Seaside Heights, N.J., collapsed from the forces of Superstorm Sandy.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

According to the historical record dating back to 1895, 2012 was the hottest year this country has ever seen. But it's not just that the temperature has risen — from deadly tornadoes to the widespread coastal damage inflicted by Superstorm Sandy, we seem to be living through a period of intensified and heightened weather extremes.

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Science
2:04 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

The Abnormally Normal Science Of Sinkholes

In the spring of 1981, a woman's house and part of a car dealership were swallowed by a sinkhole in Winter Park, Fla.
AP

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 2:58 pm

When a Florida man vanished into a massive sinkhole that opened underneath his bedroom in February, the case garnered national attention. Every so often, tragedies like this put sinkholes in the spotlight.

Researchers say that minor sinkholes occur all the time around the world without much notice.

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Media
2:04 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

When To Release Difficult Images

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 3:50 pm

Disturbing images of the dead and dying have long been used as tools to provoke change. After the tragedy in Newtown, Ct., some are urging the release of the crime photos, hoping that images of the massacre might lead to stronger gun control.

Television
1:54 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

You Can't Trust HBO's 'Phil Spector,' But You Can Enjoy It

Helen Mirren and Al Pacino star in the new HBO film Phil Spector, which was written and directed by David Mamet.
Phil Caruso HBO Films

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 2:37 pm

The HBO movie Phil Spector is a production that demands attention because of the heavyweight names attached. First, of course, there's the subject of the drama: Spector himself, the man who invented the "wall of sound," and recorded hits for everyone from the Crystals, Darlene Love and Ike & Tina Turner to the Beatles and the Righteous Brothers. Oh, and who also went on trial, in 2007, for the 2003 shooting death of actress Lana Clarkson.

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The Impact of War
12:55 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

'Unwilling Witness': Former Journalist Recalls Iraq War

Sometimes, reporting on a war can be as difficult as being in one. Host Michel Martin speaks with former journalist, Abdulrazzaq al-Saiedi, about the moment during the Iraq War when he decided to leave journalism.

Around the Nation
12:11 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

NRA Represents Only A Fraction Of Gun Owners

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, Oscar nominated actress Angela Bassett and film director Antoine Fuqua are here and they will tell us about their latest project, the action thriller "Olympus Has Fallen." It may make you rethink that White House tour you'd been planning. That's later in the program.

But now we want to take another look at the issue of gun rights and gun safety in this country. We've been hearing a variety of perspectives on this program.

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12:09 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

WMU Professor Paul Clements to run for Congress

Lead in text: 
Clements will seek Democratic nomination in the district currently represented by Republican Fred Upton
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI â€" A Western Michigan University political science professor hopes to trade academia for the campaign stump. Paul Clements is seeking the Democratic nomination for Michigan's 6th District in 2014. Clements told MLive/Kalamazoo Gazette he has registered with the Federal Election Commission, formed a committee and is currently fundraising for the 2014 congressional race.
Music Interviews
12:00 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Rock Icons Sing Pirate Songs On 'Son Of Rogues Gallery'

An image for Son of Rogues Gallery's cover art.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 1:54 pm

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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Education
12:00 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

School Closings: How Administrations Decide

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to turn to a surprisingly emotional and difficult issue in education right now. It's the debate over closing schools. Cities across the country are talking about this, especially in areas where budgets are tight and there is pressure on educators to achieve better results.

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