Law
2:19 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

After 50 Years, A State Of Crisis For The Right To Counsel

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Lynn Neary in Washington; Neal Conan is away. Fifty years ago this week, the Supreme Court ruled in Gideon versus Wainwright. It was a landmark decision that guaranteed criminal defendants the right to counsel whether or not they could pay for it. Fifty years later, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says public defense systems, quote, "exist in the state of crisis."

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World
2:18 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

The Art Of Negotiating Intractable Conflicts

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:18 am

The tensions between Israelis and Palestinians are one of many long-standing conflicts often described as intractable. Conflict negotiation experts employ various strategies to tackle big problems, ranging from divorce and property management to ethnic, religious and international conflict.

Music Reviews
1:17 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Justin Timberlake Returns To Music With Enthusiasm And 'Experience'

The 20/20 Experience is Justin Timberlake's first album since 2006.
Tom Monro RCA

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:03 am

The orchestral swirls, the transition to a soul-man groove, the falsetto croon — there you have some of the key elements to Justin Timberlake's album The 20/20 Experience. The title implies a certain clarity of vision, even as any given song presents the singer as a starry-eyed romantic, bedazzled by a woman upon whom he cannot heap enough compliments, come-ons and seductive playfulness.

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Michigan economy
12:17 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

How much and how quickly is Michigan's economy improving?

Southwest Michigan First Innovation Center- file photo
Credit WMUK

Michigan's economy is adding jobs. But the pace and strength of that recovery is a source of debate. 

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Law
11:56 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Can Arizona Demand Voters' Proof Of Citizenship?

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:29 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, the president of Xavier University of Louisiana has been on the job for 45 years now and he's guided the school through many storms, including Hurricane Katrina. Norman Francis will be with us in just a few minutes to share his wisdom about higher education and other issues. But first, a hot button issue we've been following had its day in the Supreme Court yesterday.

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NPR Story
11:56 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Muses And Metaphor 2013: Tweet Us Your Poetry!

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:29 pm

Tell Me More will celebrate National Poetry Month in April with its 3rd annual 'Muses and Metaphor' series. Listeners can tweet their short poems using the hashtag: TMM Poetry.

Health
11:56 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Breast-feeding Mothers Living In First Food Deserts

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:34 pm

Most people are aware of the positive effects of breast-feeding. But in many areas of the country, breast-feeding is not the cultural norm, and there's little support available for mothers. Host Michel Martin talks with Kimberly Seals Allers, the co-author of a new report on so-called "first food deserts," and a nursing mother, Areti Gourzis.

Television
11:27 am
Tue March 19, 2013

A Measured Look At Roth As The Writer Turns 80

A new documentary about Philip Roth premieres on PBS next week as part of a slew of celebrations in honor of the novelist's 80th birthday.
PBS

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:11 pm

In Chinua Achebe's novel The Anthills of the Savannah, one of the characters says, "Poets don't give prescriptions. They give headaches."

The same is true of novelists, and none more so than Philip Roth. If any writer has ever enjoyed rattling people's skulls, it's this son of Newark, N.J., who's currently enjoying something of a victory lap in the media on the occasion of his 80th birthday. The celebration reaches its peak with a new documentary — Philip Roth Unmasked — that will screen on PBS next week as part of the American Masters series.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:24 am
Tue March 19, 2013

How To See The World In A Grain Of Sand

Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:55 pm

This is the first in a series of commentaries by Adam on the theme of "How To See The World In A Grain Of Sand." Stay tuned to All Things Considered and 13.7 for future installments!

More than two centuries ago, the great poet William Blake offered the world the most extraordinary of possibilities:

To see a world in a grain of sand

And a heaven in a wild flower,

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Nurse Family Partnership
10:21 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Kalamazoo woman benefits from Nurse Family Partnership

Credit WMUK

A Kalamazoo woman credits the area's Nurse-Family Partnership with helping her adjust to being a young, single mother. Bridge Magazine, the online news service of the Center for Michigan looks at how the program helped 20 year old Shauntiana Bronson. 

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Farm bankruptcies
10:03 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Decatur farm bankruptcy serves as warning about rising prices

Blueberry farm in Saugatuck Township - file photo
Credit The Associated Press

A new report calls the bankruptcy of Stamp Farms in Decatur (Mlive Kalamazoo story) a warning about rising prices for farmland and rising debt. 

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Europe
9:38 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Cyprus Proposes Exempting Smaller Deposits From Tax

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawmakers in Cyprus are trying to ease rage over a proposed tax on all bank deposits by exempting people who have relatively small accounts. It's part of a bailout plan for that Mediterranean country negotiated with the E.U. and IMF over the weekend, but the compromise on taxes may not be enough for Cyprus' parliament to pass the plan.

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Local Music
8:31 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Composer Derek Bermel honors Bartok, NY

Derek Bermel
Credit Azzurra

The Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra's concert Friday will feature new music by American composer Derek Bermel

A native New Yorker, in 2009 he wrote A Shout, a Whisper, and a Trace to honor his hometown as well as the great expatriate Hungarian composer Bela Bartok, whose sometimes sorrowful letters from New York to his friends and students were an inspiration.

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8:15 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Vicksburg hires consultant to help with accounting practices

Lead in text: 
Portage man will work part-time with village on finances
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
VICKSBURG, MI - A Portage man with several years of accounting experience with area agencies and groups has been hired to straighten out the financial practices of the village of Vicksburg. Richard A. Dykstra was hired Monday by the Vicksburg Village Council as a part-time accountant and consultant.
Religion
7:52 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Installation Mass Launches Pope Francis' Papacy

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS RINGING)

INSKEEP: That's the sound of bells in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, as Pope Francis celebrated his inaugural Mass today. The ceremony was infused with meaning, both in the substance of what the new pope said and the symbolism of how he was presented.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Rome.

Hi, Sylvia.

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Around the Nation
7:37 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Broncos Cut Player After Missed Contract Deadline

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:34 am
Tue March 19, 2013

A Guilty Conscience Needs No Accuser

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A guilty conscience needs no accuser. The Barry County Sheriff's Department in Michigan received $1,200 in cash yesterday with an emotional letter. The writer admitted stealing $800 from a convenience store some 30 years ago; writing, quote, "I can't begin to say how sorry I am, but have lived with this guilt too long."

A noble gesture but keeping up with inflation, the robber would technically owe another $600.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Saint Joseph City Manager may leave earlier than expected

Lead in text: 
Frank Walsh had planned to leave in August, but is now in line for job managing Lansing-area township.
ST. JOSEPH - It looks like there won't be one more endless St. Joseph summer for City Manager Frank Walsh.
6:37 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Battle Creek meeting on crime numbers and police department

Lead in text: 
Commissioners and residents debate rankings which show high crime rate in Battle Creek. Discussion of police department gets heated.
For more than two hours Monday the Battle Creek City Commission and 100 residents talked about crime and the police department. "I think we got a lot of issues on the table and sometimes you have to do that," Mayor Susan Baldwin said after adjournment. "We heard different sides and concerns."
6:31 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Palisades owner says plant is safe.

Lead in text: 
Entergy Vice President says company is committed to operating plant near South Haven "at highest levels of safety and reliability."
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Entergy Corp., which owns Palisades nuclear power plant, said that the facility is "safe and secure," a day ahead of a webinar by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. "The Palisades nuclear plant is a safe and secure facility, and we have an NRC license to operate this facility through 2031," said Tony Vitale, site vice president for Palisades, in a statement.
6:16 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Kalamazoo City Commission approves ordinance making it illegal to enter someone else's parked car

Lead in text: 
City officials say new ordinance closes a loophole. State law makes it a crime to steal a car
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
The ordinance makes it illegal for someone to enter a parked car unless that person owns or leases the vehicle, owns or leases the property where the vehicle is located or has permission from the owner or lessee of the vehicle or of the property where the vehicle is located.
Politics
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

RNC Election Report Calls For Minority Outreach, Primary Changes

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Republican Party has issued a blistering assessment of why it lost the 2012 election. The Republican National Committee Growth and Opportunity Project told the party that if it wants to win national elections in the future, it needs to change the way it communicates with voters and runs its campaigns.

NPR's Mara Liasson reports.

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Research News
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

What Is The Effect Of Asking Americans To Think About The Greater Good?

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When President Obama recently called for stricter gun control laws, he started out by saying this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: This is the land of the free, and it always will be.

INSKEEP: The land of the free, he said. But he added this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

OBAMA: We don't live in isolation. We live in a society, a government of and by and for the people. We are responsible for each other.

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Business
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is filial piety.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

That's the ancient Chinese ethic of young people showing care and respect to their parents and older relatives. Now it's the law in China. Starting this summer, if kids don't pay enough attention to their folks, mom and dad can sue.

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Iraq
4:43 am
Tue March 19, 2013

1 Decade Since The War, Where Iraq Stands Now

An Iraqi policeman stands guard at a checkpoint decorated with plastic flowers in Baghdad in 2008.
Ali Yussef AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 12:00 pm

Ten years after the U.S.-led war in Iraq, NPR is looking at where the country stands now. NPR's Kelly McEvers recently visited Baghdad and offered this take on how the Iraqi capital feels today.

I think the single word that would best describe Baghdad these days is traffic. It can take hours just to get from one place to another. And I guess that's both good and bad.

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Around the Nation
3:18 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Historian Propels Connecticut To Claim 'First In Flight'

Gustave Whitehead and the No. 21. Connecticut claims that Whitehead's half-mile flight in 1901 was the first flight, not the well-known Wright brothers' flight that occurred two years later.
Courtesy Deutsches Flugpioniermuseum Gustav Weisskopf Leutershausen/Historical Flight Research Committee Gustave Whitehead

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 8:35 pm

The ongoing battle between historians over who was really first in flight was rekindled last week.

New research advances the theory that a German immigrant in Connecticut is responsible for the first powered and controlled flight, rather than the Wright brothers in North Carolina.

But historians at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum are saying not so fast.

Finding The Evidence

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Shots - Health News
3:16 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Bioethics Panel Warns Against Anthrax Vaccine Testing On Kids

The anthrax vaccine has been given to more than 1 million adults in the military. But no one knows how well it would work in children.
Randy Davey Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

A controversial government proposal to test the anthrax vaccine in children would be unethical without first conducting much more research, a presidential commission concluded Tuesday.

"The federal government would have to take multiple steps before anthrax vaccine trials with children could be ethically considered," Amy Gutmann, who chairs the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, tells Shots. "It would not be ethical to do it today."

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Shots - Health News
3:15 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 7:44 am

Alzheimer's disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives.

The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and figures released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association show that deaths from the disease increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010.

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9:26 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Battle Creek considers long list of bond projects

Lead in text: 
City Manager says Battle Creek's relatively healthy budget, low cost of borrowing, make it right time for bond project
The city of Battle Creek could take on $16 million in new debt to pay for a wide range of projects around downtown, in various parks and at other sites.
9:20 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Democrat Mike O'Brien won't run for Congress again in 2014

Lead in text: 
O'Brien's former campaign manager says there won't be a rematch in 2014 after he gave Republican Fred Upton one of his closest races in 2012.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
"Mike O'Brien will not be running for Congress this cycle," said Keith Rosendahl in an email. "He has his eye on 2016." In the 2012 election, the former Marine, organic farmer and business developer won 42.7 percent of the vote in Michigan's 6th District, compared with Upton's 54.5 percent.

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