It's All Politics
3:06 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Republicans Face Off Over Strategy For Picking Candidates

Karl Rove and the big donors behind his Crossroads superPAC have formed a new group, the Conservative Victory Project, to vet and recruit Republican Senate candidates.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:36 pm

Republicans have a steep hill to climb if they want to take control of the Senate next year. The GOP would need to pick up six seats in 2014.

There are plenty of open seats and vulnerable Democrats up for re-election, but Republicans are debating the best way to win.

Last year's Senate results were disappointing for the GOP: The party ended up losing a number of seats it thought were winnable — and now it's trying to figure out what to do differently next year.

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Sweetness And Light
1:53 am
Wed March 13, 2013

School Bands Should Not Be Entertainment Adjunct For Sports

A marching band performs at halftime on the field during a high school football game.
Jani Bryson iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:36 pm

Several years ago I gave a speech in which I mentioned that athletes tended to be the only college students who were awarded scholarships for what is an extracurricular activity.

Afterward, Myles Brand, the late president of the NCAA, told me I was wrong, that many music extracurricular scholarships were awarded at colleges.

Brand and I seldom agreed on much of anything, but I've always found him to be a gentleman. So, I expressed surprise at this claim.

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9:18 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Wayne State President defends long contract for faculty

Lead in text: 
Republican lawmakers have raised concerns that contract may be effort to circumvent new "right to work" law.
LANSING - Wayne State University President Allan Gilmour came out swinging this morning in Lansing, asking Republican lawmakers whether an eight-year labor contract for faculty or continued cuts in state funding were worse for students. Gilmour contended it is the latter, a point he tried to stress to members of the state House higher education subcommittee.
9:06 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Portage Public Schools budget plans don't include pay increases

Lead in text: 
Scenarios were presented to the school board based on Governor Snyder's budget plan presented last month.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI -- Best- and worst-case 2013-14 budget scenarios for Portage Public Schools do not include funding for base-salary increases, according to a presentation at Monday's Portage school board meeting. Raising base salaries for 2013-14 "will require negotiations but would seems obtainable based on circumstances," says a memo written by Karla Colestock, the district's finance director, who made Monday's presentation.
Urban poverty
8:56 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

WMU speaker discusses urban poverty and race

Renaissance Center in Detroit
Credit River North Photography / iStrock Photo

A scholar well-known for his work on poverty, race and inequality will speak on Friday at Western Michigan University. William Julius Wilson teaches in the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He’s also the author of several books on the issues of urban poverty and race. 

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The Salt
6:24 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Can Dunkin' Donuts Really Turn Its Palm Oil Green?

Dunkin' Donuts plans to go green by committing to purchasing all of its palm oil from sustainable sources.
Andrew Huff/via Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 7:13 pm

Dunkin' Donuts is changing its recipes — though you may not notice much difference the next time you bite into a cruller. In response to pressure from one of New York's top elected officials, the company recently announced that it will set a goal of using only 100 percent sustainable palm oil in making its donuts.

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It's All Politics
5:47 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

'Unprecedented': Budget Cuts Could Hit Some Airport Towers

A statue of golf legend Arnold Palmer stands outside Arnold Palmer Regional Airport in Latrobe, Pa.
Brian Naylor NPR

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:45 pm

Control towers at many small and medium-sized airports around the country are set to shut down next month because of the across-the-board federal budget cuts. The towers have been operated under contract to the Federal Aviation Administration.

One of the airports affected is in Latrobe, Pa., southeast of Pittsburgh — the Arnold Palmer Regional Airport, named after the golf great who grew up a well-placed drive from the runway. A statue of Palmer watches over the small terminal.

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National Security
5:25 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Cyberattacks, Terrorism Top U.S. Security Threat Report

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (center), accompanied by FBI Director Robert Mueller (left) and CIA Director John Brennan, testifies on Capitol Hill on Tuesday.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 6:42 pm

James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, went before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday in a bit of a sour mood. He led off complaining that he had to speak publicly at all.

"An open hearing on intelligence matters," Clapper said, "is a contradiction in terms." And then, before getting to any international problems Clapper hit a domestic one: the spending cuts mandated under the sequestration package.

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Arts & Life
5:18 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Muses And Metaphor 2013: Tweet Us Your Poetry!

Melanie Taube NPR

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:50 am

Poetry and social media join forces once again in April. Tell Me More celebrates National Poetry Month with its 3rd annual Muses and Metaphor series. We'll feature poems exchanged via Twitter by NPR fans — always in 140 characters or fewer. Tweet your poem using the hashtag: #TMMPoetry.

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All Tech Considered
4:55 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Dad's 'Donkey Kong' Hack Recasts Female As Hero For Daughter

A screenshot shows game designer Mike Mika's Donkey Kong: Pauline Edition he created for his daughter show she could play as a female hero.
Screengrab via YouTube

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 6:42 pm

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Animals
4:55 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Quick Brown Fox Can't Find Camouflaged Quail Eggs

Researchers wanted to know if Japanese quail were aware of the colors and patterns on their eggs.
Courtesy of Lovell et al.

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:57 am

It's almost spring, and for many animals, warmer weather means it's time to find a mate. If you're a bird, finding that mate means a new clutch of eggs won't be far behind.

But keeping those eggs safe until they hatch can be a challenge, especially if you're a Japanese quail — a small ground-nesting bird that counts foxes among its predators.

The eggs of Coturnix japonica are tiny — not much bigger than a quarter. They're off-white or tan in color, with darker speckles.

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4:31 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Michiganders earn $4,000 less than the U.S. average, says UM Economist

Lead in text: 
Economists at the University of Michigan say workers in the state's private sector earn about $4,000 less a year than the national average.
(courtesy photo/used under Creative Commons license) By Rick Haglund/Bridge Magazine correspondent Separate data compiled by state labor market analysts on 22 occupational groups found the average wage in Michigan was lower than the national average wage in 16 of those groups in 2010.
3:46 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Alamo group may monitor speedway noise

Lead in text: 
Controversy over a proposed noise ordinance prompted township officials to delay action on the issue earlier this year.
Township Supervisor Lou Conti said he would like to form a six-member committee, with three members chosen by the Kalamazoo Speedway and three by the township, to monitor noise coming from the race track this year. The group would have assistance from Kalamazoo Township, which has agreed to loan equipment and train residents on how to properly take sound readings, he said.
Business
3:46 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

The Reclusive Spanish Billionaire Behind Zara's Fast Fashion Empire

A notorious recluse, Amancio Ortega founded the Zara clothing chain and is No. 3 on Forbes magazine's billionaire list.
Inditex AP

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 8:18 pm

He's the richest man you've never heard of: Amancio Ortega, founder of the Spanish clothing chain Zara. He's a notorious recluse who is rumored to wear the same plain shirt every day, but his Zara empire has come to define the concept of fast fashion.

And now he's taken Warren Buffett's No. 3 spot on Forbes' billionaires list.

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Shots - Health News
3:09 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Can Kidney Transplants Ease Strain On Gaza's Health System?

A Palestinian dialysis patient is treated at the Shifa hospital in Gaza City in 2010. Many kidney patients in Gaza struggle to get proper dialysis therapy because machines are often overbooked.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:54 am

It's no picnic being a kidney patient even in the best conditions. But coming in for dialysis in a place like the Gaza Strip calls for a special kind of patience.

Years of war have placed a constant stress on the health system there. Thanks to a host of factors, Gaza's main hospital, Shifa Hospital, regularly faces supply shortages of medications that kidney patients need to manage nausea and other symptoms.

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Adam Davidson is co-founder and co-host of Planet Money, a co-production of NPR and This American Life. He also writes the weekly "It's the Economy" column for the New York Times Magazine.

His work has won several major awards including the Peabody, DuPont-Columbia, and the Polk. His radio documentary on the housing crisis, "The Giant Pool of Money," which he co-reported and produced with Alex Blumberg, was named one of the top ten works of journalism of the decade by the Arthur L. Carter of Journalism Institute at New York University. It was widely recognized as the clearest and most entertaining explanation of the roots of the financial crisis in any media.

Planet Money
2:41 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

4.2 Million Americans Were Hired In January (And 4.1 Million Quit Or Got Fired)

Calculated Risk

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 6:42 pm

One jobs number gets all the attention: The number of jobs lost or gained in the previous month.

That number is important. But focusing too much on the net change in jobs can be misleading. It gives the impression that a job is like a widget — it's something that gets made in a factory somewhere, and that we hope exists forever.

That's not how it works. Even in good economic times ,new jobs are constantly being created and old jobs are constantly being destroyed. (Of course, you do want the number of jobs created to exceed the number of jobs destroyed.)

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Arts & Life
2:37 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Backstage At The Bolshoi Ballet

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:29 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

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Music Interviews
2:23 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

Adrian Younge: Looking Back To Move Hip-Hop Forward

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:13 pm

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Book Reviews
2:19 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

'Lean In': Not Much Of A Manifesto, But Still A Win For Women

AP

Sheryl Sandberg tells an anecdote in her new book, Lean In, about sitting down with her boss, Mark Zuckerberg, for her first performance review as chief operating officer at Facebook. Zuckerberg told her that her "desire to be liked by everybody would hold [her] back." I hope she's worked on that problem because over the past few weeks, there sure have been a lot of people hating on Sheryl Sandberg.

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Energy
2:03 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

As Natural Gas Creeps In, King Coal's Reign Fades

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:29 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. In many parts of the country, coal has been king for many years, but that's changing. Ten years ago, coal fired half the U.S. electrical power plants. Now that's about a third and dropping. As coal companies switch to cheaper and cleaner natural gas, some coal companies in the east are closing mines and laying off workers.

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Medical Treatments
1:59 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

A Clinical Dilemma: Prescribing Pot To Patients

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:29 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. In 18 states and the District of Columbia, marijuana is medicine by popular vote. A lot of doctors don't see it that way. They say pot presents problems that include potency, efficacy, corruption, and of course it's still illegal under federal law.

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Africa
11:43 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Kenyans Select President, But Opponent Vows Fight

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 12:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we will talk about the Reverend Al reboot - Reverend Al Sharpton, that is. For some people he's still just a loud-mouth provocateur, but for others he's become a trusted analyst, activist, and ally. NPR correspondent Corey Dade recently spent a very busy day with him and he'll tell us what he found out in just a few minutes.

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Around the Nation
11:43 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Moms Lean In... Or Not

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 12:05 pm

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's Chief Operating Officer, pushed buttons with her new book Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. In it, she advises young women to 'lean in' to their careers, and be more aggressive in pursuing leadership opportunities. Host Michel Martin asks the moms roundtable if they agree.

Race
11:43 am
Tue March 12, 2013

The Revolution of Reverend Al Sharpton

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 12:05 pm

The Reverend Al Sharpton has moved from controversial street protester to a media activist with access to the president. Host Michel Martin talks with Corey Dade, NPR digital news correspondent, about his profile of 'The Rev.'

7:40 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Lawmakers likely to approve bear petting, despite warnings from zookeepers

Lead in text: 
President of Battle Creek's Binder Park Zoo is among officials who have raised concerns about safety.
  • Source: Bridgemi
  • | Via: Center for Michigan
Despite resistance from the state's traditional zookeepers, a bill written to keep visitors to an Upper Peninsula tourist attraction petting its bears appears bound for the governor's desk.
7:33 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Closure of Battle Creek's air traffic control tower would disrupt Western Michigan University's College of Aviation

Lead in text: 
Tower in Battle Creek is one of six in Michigan and 238 nationwide that could be shut down as part of automatic federal spending cuts
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
BATTLE CREEK, MI - If the planned closure of the W.K. Kellogg's air traffic control tower in Battle Creek goes ahead in April, it won't ground the 38 planes of Western Michigan University's College of Aviation.
7:28 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Michigan colleges and universities vary widely in disaster drills

Lead in text: 
Universities are not required to hold drills.
As uneven as many K-12 schools are in following school-safety requirements, Michigan colleges and universities seem even more confused, an MLive Media Group investigation found. Michigan State University drills its dormitories regularly; the University of Michigan much less so. Disparities in the type and number of safety drills vary widely at other universities across the state.
6:44 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Snyder's top pick for Detroit Emergency Manager is a financial turnaround specialist

Lead in text: 
Governor Snyder's spokeswoman won't confirm that Kevyn Orr is in line to be name manager of Michigan's largest city
Kevyn Orr, a partner in the prestigious Jones Day law firm of Washington, D.C., is Gov. Rick Snyder's leading choice to become Detroit's emergency financial manager, assuming Snyder decides to go forward with proposing an EFM after today's hearing on the Detroit City Council's appeal in Lansing.
6:32 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Covert Schools Superintendent to step down in summer

Lead in text: 
Michael Alexander hints at rocky relationship with school board. Some board members say they didn't intend to renew his contract.
COVERT - Covert Schools Superintendent Michael Alexander will step down when his contract expires June 30.

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