Book Reviews
2:19 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

'Lean In': Not Much Of A Manifesto, But Still A Win For Women

AP

Sheryl Sandberg tells an anecdote in her new book, Lean In, about sitting down with her boss, Mark Zuckerberg, for her first performance review as chief operating officer at Facebook. Zuckerberg told her that her "desire to be liked by everybody would hold [her] back." I hope she's worked on that problem because over the past few weeks, there sure have been a lot of people hating on Sheryl Sandberg.

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Energy
2:03 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

As Natural Gas Creeps In, King Coal's Reign Fades

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:29 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. In many parts of the country, coal has been king for many years, but that's changing. Ten years ago, coal fired half the U.S. electrical power plants. Now that's about a third and dropping. As coal companies switch to cheaper and cleaner natural gas, some coal companies in the east are closing mines and laying off workers.

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Medical Treatments
1:59 pm
Tue March 12, 2013

A Clinical Dilemma: Prescribing Pot To Patients

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 4:29 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. In 18 states and the District of Columbia, marijuana is medicine by popular vote. A lot of doctors don't see it that way. They say pot presents problems that include potency, efficacy, corruption, and of course it's still illegal under federal law.

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Africa
11:43 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Kenyans Select President, But Opponent Vows Fight

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 12:05 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we will talk about the Reverend Al reboot - Reverend Al Sharpton, that is. For some people he's still just a loud-mouth provocateur, but for others he's become a trusted analyst, activist, and ally. NPR correspondent Corey Dade recently spent a very busy day with him and he'll tell us what he found out in just a few minutes.

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Around the Nation
11:43 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Moms Lean In... Or Not

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 12:05 pm

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's Chief Operating Officer, pushed buttons with her new book Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. In it, she advises young women to 'lean in' to their careers, and be more aggressive in pursuing leadership opportunities. Host Michel Martin asks the moms roundtable if they agree.

Race
11:43 am
Tue March 12, 2013

The Revolution of Reverend Al Sharpton

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 12:05 pm

The Reverend Al Sharpton has moved from controversial street protester to a media activist with access to the president. Host Michel Martin talks with Corey Dade, NPR digital news correspondent, about his profile of 'The Rev.'

7:40 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Lawmakers likely to approve bear petting, despite warnings from zookeepers

Lead in text: 
President of Battle Creek's Binder Park Zoo is among officials who have raised concerns about safety.
  • Source: Bridgemi
  • | Via: Center for Michigan
Despite resistance from the state's traditional zookeepers, a bill written to keep visitors to an Upper Peninsula tourist attraction petting its bears appears bound for the governor's desk.
7:33 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Closure of Battle Creek's air traffic control tower would disrupt Western Michigan University's College of Aviation

Lead in text: 
Tower in Battle Creek is one of six in Michigan and 238 nationwide that could be shut down as part of automatic federal spending cuts
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
BATTLE CREEK, MI - If the planned closure of the W.K. Kellogg's air traffic control tower in Battle Creek goes ahead in April, it won't ground the 38 planes of Western Michigan University's College of Aviation.
7:28 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Michigan colleges and universities vary widely in disaster drills

Lead in text: 
Universities are not required to hold drills.
As uneven as many K-12 schools are in following school-safety requirements, Michigan colleges and universities seem even more confused, an MLive Media Group investigation found. Michigan State University drills its dormitories regularly; the University of Michigan much less so. Disparities in the type and number of safety drills vary widely at other universities across the state.
6:44 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Snyder's top pick for Detroit Emergency Manager is a financial turnaround specialist

Lead in text: 
Governor Snyder's spokeswoman won't confirm that Kevyn Orr is in line to be name manager of Michigan's largest city
Kevyn Orr, a partner in the prestigious Jones Day law firm of Washington, D.C., is Gov. Rick Snyder's leading choice to become Detroit's emergency financial manager, assuming Snyder decides to go forward with proposing an EFM after today's hearing on the Detroit City Council's appeal in Lansing.
6:32 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Covert Schools Superintendent to step down in summer

Lead in text: 
Michael Alexander hints at rocky relationship with school board. Some board members say they didn't intend to renew his contract.
COVERT - Covert Schools Superintendent Michael Alexander will step down when his contract expires June 30.
Around the Nation
6:30 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Arizona State's Mascot Gets A Makeover, And Backlash

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Arizona State never had much luck with sports mascots. When it was a normal, or a teacher's school, they were the Normals. Later they became the Arizona State Sun Devils. This mascot is Sparky the Sun Devil in a red costume with horns and a pitchfork. Now Disney has helped update Sparky, but some students find his big eyes and bulging muscles creepy. Students may vote on Sparky's future after the campus paper warned he'll scare kids. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
6:29 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Arizona Gator Gets $6,000 Prosthetic Tail

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

There's "The Six Million Dollar Man" and now there is the $6,000 alligator. He's called Mr. Stubbs because his tail was bitten off years ago. Mr. Stubbs was taken in by the Phoenix Herpetological Society, where, The Arizona Republic reports, an orthopedic care specialist realized a silicone tail could be designed for him. Mr. Stubbs now sports a $6,000 prosthetic, making him half gator, half rubber.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:27 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Calhoun and Jackson Counties discuss partnership on some road responsibilities

Lead in text: 
Counties considering plan to share some staff and combining resources like sign shops
Officials in Jackson and Calhoun counties are talking about ways the two governments can share some road responsibilities. Discussions are only preliminary, but both sides said combining some aspects of their separate road departments could help save money while improving local roads.
6:13 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Schoolcraft building consolidation plan will keep all four schools open

Lead in text: 
Superintendent says plan chosen by board was the best and the least costly
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
SCHOOLCRAFT, MI - Schoolcraft Community Schools has approved a building consolidation plan that will keep all four buildings open but realign elementary classes.
Latin America
5:17 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Mexican President Shifts Focus From Drugs To Progress

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:48 am

Mexico's new president, Enrique Peña Nieto, has been in office for three months, and despite his claims that he's fighting drug violence with a new strategy, there are no signs the situation is any better. The president prefers to focus on Mexico's economic potential and has been touring the country, giving pep talks wherever he goes.

NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Maine, Tribes Seek 'Truth And Reconciliation'

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:54 am

In Maine, an unusual and historic process is under way to document child welfare practices that once resulted in Indian children being forcibly removed from their homes. Many of the native children were placed with white foster parents. Chiefs from all five of Maine's tribes, along with Gov. Paul LePage, have created a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to help heal the wounds.

NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue March 12, 2013

What American Catholics Want From The Next Pontiff

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Awaiting the white smoke from the Sistine Chapel are many of the 75 million Catholics in the U.S., and the question comes up, what do American Catholics want to see in the next pope? The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life explored that question in recent surveys. Here with the findings is Pew senior researcher Greg Smith. Good morning.

GREG SMITH: Good morning.

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Elise Hu is a reporter who covers the intersection of technology and culture for NPR's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

She joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters who helped launch The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

All Tech Considered
4:29 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Self-Tracking Apps To Help You 'Quantify' Yourself

Noah Zandan shows off his Zeo sleep-tracking headband. His other self-tracking devices are on his wrists. Noah and his father, Peter, are both part of the growing "Quantified Self" movement.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 11:11 am

Technology has made it easier than ever to track your activity levels, your sleep cycles, how you spend your time, and more. The self-trackers who near-obsessively capture and analyze their own data are part of a growing "Quantified Self" movement.

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Latin America
3:58 am
Tue March 12, 2013

In Upcoming Venezuelan Vote, Hugo Chavez Looms Large

An image of late President Hugo Chavez hangs behind acting President Nicolas Maduro, as he speaks to supporters after registering his candidacy outside the national electoral council in Caracas, Venezuela, on Monday.
Ariana Cubillos AP

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:17 am

The tall and imposing Nicolas Maduro stepped forward last week to be sworn in as Venezuela's interim leader following the death of President Hugo Chavez.

Before the country's packed congressional hall, he swore to complete Chavez's dream to transform the OPEC power into a socialist state, allied with Cuba and decidedly opposed to capitalism and U.S. interests in Latin America.

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The Salt
3:58 am
Tue March 12, 2013

Mississippi Passes 'Anti-Bloomberg' Bill

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 5:11 pm

Mayor Mike and his public health edicts are having a rough ride.

On Monday, a state judge in Manhattan struck down New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's rule capping soda sizes. And lawmakers in Mississippi are taking the backlash against government regulation on food marketing one step further.

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Arts & Life
3:51 am
Tue March 12, 2013

'Bowery Boys' Are Amateur But Beloved New York Historians

Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 4:12 pm

In the 19th century, the Bowery Boys were a street gang that ruled that small section of Manhattan. In the 21st century, the Bowery Boys are two best friends — Tom Meyers and Greg Young — who record a do-it-yourself podcast with the same name.

Meyers and Young love to perform almost as much as they love New York City, and their show traces the unofficial history of the place. They record a few blocks from — you guessed it — the Bowery district.

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Classical Literature
7:50 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

World language students to host marathon reading of 'The Aeneid'

'Aeneas' Flight from Troy' by Federico Barrocci
Credit http://www.ibiblio.org

What could be more epic than reading an epic poem in the way it would have been read more than two thousand years ago? How about reading it in English from beginning to end? The Western Michigan University World Languages department is doing a live marathon reading of Virgil’s The Aeneid on Friday.

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Music, Theatre, & Dance
7:37 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

'A Soldier's Tale': A musical look at what it means to be a soldier

The CD cover for American Chamber Winds' recording of 'A Soldier's Tale'

For as long as there have been wars, there have been stories about the brave soldiers who fought in them. But what about the others? On Friday, Fontana Chamber Arts and the Western Michigan University School of Music, along with WMU actors and dancers, will tell a story about a very different kind of soldier.

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Music Interviews
5:36 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

The Creator Of 'Chillwave,' On California's Complications

Toro y Moi's latest album is titled Anything in Return.
Andrew Paynter Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:48 pm

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Around the Nation
5:09 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Owens Valley Salty As Los Angeles Water Battle Flows Into Court

Owens Lake — which dried up after losing its water source, the Owens River, to Los Angeles — is known to be a source of air pollution. The city of L.A. is in court over obligations to control dust pollution at the lake.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:30 pm

In the West, fights over water last a long time.

It's been almost 100 years since William Mulholland stood atop an aqueduct along the Owens River and said, "There it is, take it." He was referring to a diversion channel that started piping water to Los Angeles from 200 miles away. That water allowed L.A. to become the metropolis it is today.

But it also meant that the Owens River no longer flowed into the massive Owens Lake, which quickly dried up and became one of the biggest environmental disasters in the nation.

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Remembrances
4:40 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Remembering Lillian Cahn, Creator Of The Coach Handbag

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:36 pm

Lillian Cahn, co-founder of Coach Leatherwear Co., died March 4 at the age of 89. Cahn was the force behind today's high-end leather handbags.

Back in the 1960s, she and her husband, Miles Cahn, were running a leather goods business in Manhattan. They produced men's wallets and billfolds but wanted to expand.

"My wife had a great sense of style, and she made the suggestions that we men maybe were a little thoughtless about," Miles Cahn says with a laugh. "Among her many suggestions was: 'Why don't we make pocketbooks?' I like to tell people I scoffed at the suggestion."

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It's All Politics
4:38 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Obama Team Stops Saying 'Global War On Terror' But Doesn't Stop Waging It

Standing in front of the Constitution, President Obama delivers an address on national security and terrorism in 2009 at the National Archives in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:36 pm

After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush often made a provocative claim: He argued that the U.S. was fighting a war without a typical battlefield. In effect, he said, this war is everywhere.

"Our enemies make no distinction based on borders," he said in a 2007 speech in Michigan. "They view the world as a giant battlefield and will strike wherever they can."

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Ryan Loyd is Texas Public Radio's city beat and political reporter who brings more than a decade of news experience back to his hometown.

Ryan began reporting at KGNB radio in New Braunfels, followed by KTSA. He worked in television news in Joplin, MO, San Antonio, Sherman, Texas, and Austin.

Since joining TPR in October 2011, Ryan has covered stories of local, state and national interest including the 2012 Democratic National Convention, where San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro delivered the keynote address.

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