Around the Nation
5:34 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Wash. State Bridge Collapses, 3 People Injured

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:01 am

The collapse sent people and vehicles into the water Thursday night. Authorities say there were no fatalities. The bridge, about an hour north of Seattle, lost its northernmost span β€” taking out all lanes in both directions.

Business
5:14 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Insurers Picked For California Health Exchange

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

More, now, on the new federal health care law. States are preparing for that law to take effect. In California, officials have now unveiled plans - and prices - for millions of residents who will be using a new health insurance exchange to purchase their coverage next year. This is a key test of the federal health law's ability to draw competitive bids from insurance companies. Sarah Varney reports.

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Business
5:14 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a comeback.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Procter & Gamble made a surprise announcement last night. It's bringing back its former CEO as the company's new CEO. A.G. Lafley will replace Bob McDonald. Procter & Gamble is behind names like Crest toothpaste and Tide laundry detergent. The 170-year-old company has been struggling to grow in emerging markets. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Parallels
4:11 am
Fri May 24, 2013

China's Air Pollution: Is The Government Willing To Act?

Skyscrapers are obscured by heavy haze in Beijing on Jan. 13. Air pollution remains a serious β€” sometimes overwhelming β€” problem, but researchers say environmental technology is available to solve it.
Ng Han Guan AP

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 11:55 am

Denise Mauzerall arrived in Beijing this year at a time that was both horrifying and illuminating. The capital was facing some of its worst pollution in recent memory, and Mauzerall, a Princeton environmental engineering professor, was passing through on her way to a university forum on the future of cities.

"I took the fast train from Beijing to Shanghai, and looking out the window for large sections of that trip, you couldn't see more than 20 feet," Mauzerall recalled.

To Mauzerall, the lesson was surprising and inescapable.

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Planet Money
3:18 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Can This Man Bring Silicon Valley To Yangon?

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 9:29 am

Like a proud father, Nay Aung opens up his MacBook Air to show me the Myanmar travel website he has built. But we wait 30 seconds for the site to load, and nothing happens.

"Today is a particularly bad day for Internet," he says. This is life in Myanmar today: Even an Internet entrepreneur can't always get online.

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Food
2:49 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Guava Paste And Tamarind? What To Do With Weird Food Gifts

Harrison Gowdy of Dayton, Ohio, has accumulated various Indian spices, guava paste and coconut oil β€” among other things.
Courtesy of Harrison Gowdy

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:59 am

This is an installment of NPR's ongoing Cook Your Cupboard, a food series about improvising with what you have on hand. Have a food that has you stumped? Submit a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites.

Harrison Gowdy of Dayton, Ohio, has developed a reputation among friends and family of liking everything and wasting nothing.

"Sometimes I'll even find things like Swiss chard dropped off on my doorstep," she says. And sometimes she receives foods that stump her.

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StoryCorps
2:46 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Military Moms: A Bond Borne From Shared Loss

Sally Edwards (left), 80, and Lue Hutchinson, 71, visited StoryCorps in Cincinnati. Their sons, Jack Edwards and Tom Butts, are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:22 am

In 1991, Kentucky residents Sally Edwards and Lue Hutchinson had sons serving in the Gulf War. Sally's son, Jack, was a Marine captain. Lue's son, Tom Butts, was a staff sergeant in the Army. The two men never knew each other, but today, their mothers are best friends.

Both soldiers were killed in February of 1991. Jack was 34. "They were the cover for a medical mission. The helicopter lost its top rotor blade, and they didn't make it back," Sally says.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:03 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Igor Stravinsky's 'Rite Of Spring' Counterrevolution

After his shocking ballet, The Rite of Spring, Igor Stravinsky branched out in surprising directions.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:54 am

As the 100th anniversary of Igor Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring approaches, commentator Miles Hoffman reminds us that β€” as earthshaking as that infamous debut was β€” the composer soon branched out into a variety of musical styles that would surprise his fans and critics.

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10:19 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Grand Rapids John Ball Zoo Society changes management stucture

Lead in text: 
Zoo currently operates under partnership between zoo society and Kent County
GRAND RAPIDS, MI - John Ball Zoo Society members on Thursday approved an historic vote that moves the 122-year-old zoo toward reorganizing into a non-profit, public-private partnership.
9:48 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

No military aircraft this year, but Battle Creek air show will go on

Lead in text: 
Field of Flight scheduled for July in Battle Creek
Battle Creek may not see military jets in the air July 4, but Dusty will be here. Federal budget cuts have grounded the USAF Thunderbirds, canceling their planned appearance at the 2013 Battle Creek Field of Flight Air Show & Balloon Festival.
9:30 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Allegan County approved 911 dispatch upgrades

Lead in text: 
County may not spend all $1.1-million
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
ALLEGAN, MI -- The Allegan County Board of Commissioners on Thursday approved up to $1.1 million in improvements to the county's 911 central dispatch system. The decision came after a clarification that it wasn't entirely an approval for the full purchase.
Around the Nation
7:23 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Boy Scouts Vote To Allow Gay Members, But Not Leaders

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 6:01 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Boy Scouts ban on openly gay scouts is coming to an end. That's the result of a vote held today by the leadership of the Boys Scouts of America.

WAYNE PERRY: Our vision is to serve every kid. We want every kid to have a place where they belong, to learn and grow and feel protected.

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Shots - Health News
6:27 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Why You Have To Scratch That Itch

The origin of itch has confounded scientists for decades.
Oktay Ortakcioglu iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 11:20 am

Everybody itches. Sometimes itch serves as a useful warning signal β€” there's a bug on your back! But sometimes itch arises for no apparent reason, and can be a torment.

Think of the itchy skin disorder eczema, or the constant itching caused by some cancers. "A very high percentage of people who're on dialysis for chronic kidney disease develop severe itch that's very difficult to manage," says Dr. Ethan Lerner, an associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School.

Scientists now say they've got a much better clue as to how itch happens.

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Shots - Health News
6:12 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Abortion Opponents Try to Spin Murder Case Into Legislation

Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., has introduced a federal bill to ban most abortions after 20 weeks' gestation β€” six weeks into the second trimester. This is the second straight Congress he's done so, but this time he's broadened his bill to encompass all 50 states, not just D.C.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 8:23 pm

As predicted, abortion opponents on Capitol Hill are wasting no time in their efforts to turn publicity over the recent murder conviction of abortion provider Kermit Gosnell to their legislative advantage.

Their latest goal: a federal ban on most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

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The Two-Way
6:05 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

After The Storm: Students Gather For One More School Day

Students and teachers from Eastlake Elementary and Plaza Towers Elementary schools gathered Thursday to say goodbye for the summer. This was a chance to reconnect after the devastating tornado brought an abrupt end to the school year at Plaza Towers in Moore, Okla.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 6:08 am

Under cloudy skies and through intermittent showers, 4-year-old Kamrin Ramirez holds in her little hands two cards, one addressed to Ms. Patterson, the other for Ms. Johnson, her two preschool teachers at Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Okla.

"I write thank you so much," she says.

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Science
6:05 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

'Extremely Active' Atlantic Hurricane Season Predicted

Hurricane Sandy churns off the Atlantic coast on Oct. 29. NOAA officials are forecasting seven to 11 hurricanes, compared with about six in a typical season.
NASA Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Unusually warm ocean temperatures and favorable wind patterns mean the Atlantic is likely to see "an active or extremely active" hurricane season this year, say officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The agency expects between seven and 11 hurricanes and as many as 20 named storms during the 2013 season, which runs from June 1 through November.

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Local Music
5:34 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Electric cello and dancing pears: Listen to The Moxie Strings

The Moxie Strings at the Kalamazoo Irish Festival
Credit The Moxie Strings

About a year ago, the regional band called String Cheese changed their name to avoid confusion with another ensemble called The String Cheese Incident. The name they switched to is The Moxie Strings. The Moxie Strings play at 8 p.m. on Friday, May 24 at the Riviera Theatre in Three Rivers.Β 

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
4:33 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

'Lunch Lady' Author Helps Students Draw Their Own Heroes

Author Jarrett Krosoczka teaches a drawing class to a group of third- and fifth-graders at the Walker-Jones Education Campus in Washington, D.C.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Author and illustrator Jarrett Krosoczka is just 35 years old, but he's already published 20 books, including the popular Lunch Lady graphic novel series, NPR's Backseat Book Club pick for May.

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Station News
4:14 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

WMUK and StoryCorps collaborate to tell local military stories

An oral history project honoring veterans, service members and military families is partnering with WMU to record and preserve the stories of local community members.

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Movie Interviews
4:03 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Julianne Moore, Relishing Complicated Characters

Moore (photographed at New York Fashion Week in February 2013) has earned Oscar nominations for her roles in Boogie Nights, The End of the Affair, Far From Heaven and The Hours.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

In the film What Maisie Knew, Julianne Moore plays a troubled rock star whose young daughter witnesses her parents' volatile behavior as they argue over custody during their rocky separation.

On the surface, Moore's character, Susanna, might seem to be an entirely terrible one β€” a self-involved person and inappropriate mother who's not paying attention to her child. But Moore makes her more complicated than that.

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3:46 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Oldest person in America celebrates 114th birthday near Detroit

Lead in text: 
The oldest American is 114 years old today and she lives in Inkster, Michigan.
Michigan woman, oldest living American, celebrates 114th birthday today Jeralean Talley of Inkster is the oldest living American - and third-oldest person in the world, according to the Gerontology Research Group, which keeps a list of the world's oldest people. A link to this page will be included in your message.
3:39 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

About 50 Southwest Michigan companies receive Catalyst Awards

Lead in text: 
Southwest Michigan First presents the awards every year to businesses and organizations that help grow the area’s economy and create jobs.
KALAMAZOO, MI -- More than 50 regional companies, organizations and individuals -- from long-entrentched businesses to those still under development -- were named 2013 winners Wednesday of Catalyst Awards, care of Southwest Michigan First. Presented annually since 2005, the awards recognize significant contributions that have resulted in economic growth and job creation in Southwest Michigan.
Arts & Life
1:55 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

A Read Down Memory Lane: Lessons From Your Former Self

Writings from childhood β€” cards, stories and other notes β€” can hide for decades, like time capsules tucked away in boxes, old bedrooms, attics and journals. Writer Jim Sollisch talks about how old thank you notes from his youth foreshadowed his adult life.

Asia
1:53 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

A Look Ahead To The Flash Point In The South China Sea

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 1:54 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Close to half of the world's maritime traffic passes through the South China Sea. Vast deposits of oil and natural gas are believed to lie beneath the ocean floor there. These waters are also the scene of bitter international rivalry as at least five smaller countries find themselves in lopsided disputes with China.

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Music Interviews
1:50 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Pitbull Gets 'Epic': 'You Constantly Have To Defend Your Success'

Pitbull's latest album is titled Global Warming, and he voices the character Bufo in the new movie Epic.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 1:30 am

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Television
1:49 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Douglas, Damon Illuminate HBO's 'Candelabra'

Michael Douglas stars as the flamboyant pianist and entertainer Liberace in Steven Soderbergh's new HBO biopic, Behind the Candelabra.
Claudette Barius HBO

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 6:43 pm

Before you see any of Behind the Candelabra -- when you just consider the concept of the TV movie and its casting β€” this new HBO Films production raises all sorts of questions: How much will be based on verifiable fact, and how much will be fictionalized? On an anything-goes premium-cable network such as HBO, how graphic will the sex scenes be?

And the most important questions involve the drama's two leading men, playing an ultra-flamboyant piano player and the wide-eyed young man who becomes his behind-the-scenes companion for five years. Michael Douglas? Matt Damon?

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National Security
1:48 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

The President's Remarks On The Future Of National Security

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is special coverage from NPR News. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. In just a few minutes, President Obama will deliver what's described as a major address at the National Defense University here in Washington, D.C., a speech where he's expected to refocus strategy and tactics in the war against al-Qaida and its affiliates.

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Arts & Life
12:03 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

HBCU President Asks Dr. Dre, Why Not Us?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Moving on to other news in education, last week hip-hop mogul Dr. Dre and music producer Jimmy Iovine announced that they would be giving the University of Southern California $70 million to create a degree that will blend business, marketing, product development, design and liberal arts.

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Fine Art
12:02 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

What does home feel like? Kalamazoo artist puts it on canvas

Artist Bonnie Pfingst looks over one of her works in progress. It's made from an old printing tray.
Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

β€œAs an adult, that feeling that I had as a child has escaped me. That comfort and the security and safety of home," says Kalamazoo artist Bonnie Pfingst. "That I’ve just now recently purchased my own home here in Kalamazoo and I’m loving it. Every day I can’t wait to get home and build a fire. And sit on the couch with my son and just enjoy life, just be.”

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Education
11:32 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Being Blind To Financial Need: Is It Worth It?

Millions of students rely on loans and grants for their studies. But with universities strapped for cash, fewer schools are able to admit students regardless of their financial need. Host Michel Martin asks the President of Iowa's Grinnell College, Dr. Raynard Kington, why his school considered putting a halt to need-blind admissions.

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