6:34 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Expanding preschool access in Michigan has broad support

Lead in text: 
Bipartisan support at both the state and federal level gives hope to advocates of early childhood education
Early education advocates who have long lamented the lack of preschool slots in Michigan are buoyed by pledges this year from Gov. Rick Snyder and President Barack Obama to make preschool funding a priority. Snyder, a Republican, proposes $130 million more for Michigan's Great Start Readiness Program for low- and moderate-income kids over two years.
6:27 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Forestry bill concerns environmentalists

Lead in text: 
Senator Tom Casperson says he wants DNR to hear from business and recreational interests, not just environmentalists.
More than 4 million acres of state forest land could become more susceptible to disease and tree-killing pests if an Upper Peninsula state senator's bill becomes law, scientists and environmentalists opposed to the measure say. The bill introduced by Sen.
6:21 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Byron Center meat processor recalls 6,500 pounds of ham

Lead in text: 
No illness has been reported. Products were distributed in Michigan and Indiana
BYRON TOWNSHIP, MI - Food safety regulators are recalling thousands of pounds of ham from a Kent County meat processor which they say was produced without a safety plan in place to prevent Listeria contamination.
6:10 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Update: Midwest Energy Cooperative says power restored

Lead in text: 
Outage was mostly in Mattawan, Lawton and Schoolcraft
  • Source: Teammidwest
  • | Via: Midwest Energy Cooperative news release
Transmission service to four Midwest Energy Cooperative substations was restored at about 4:20 a.m. Monday. An Indiana-Michigan Power transmission line serving four Cooperative substations went down around 7 p.m. Sunday, leaving 4800 members without power. Areas most heavily impacted included Mattawan, Prairie Ronde, Schoolcraft, Lawton, Vicksburg and Kalamazoo.
Around the Nation
6:02 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Mom Saves Baby From Deadly Drop Out Of Window

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

A woman in Spokane, Washington stepped out of the shower and into a moment of terror. Her 14-month-old boy was bouncing on the bed. He bounced out a half-open second-story window. She dove after the boy, smashed through the window, grabbed his foot as he was tumbling down the porch roof and lowered the kid safely to his grandma, who was smoking on the porch.

The mom then crashed into a bush. She's scraped up. The baby is fine.

It's All Politics
6:02 am
Mon March 4, 2013

President Obama To Nominate New EPA, Budget And Energy Heads

President Obama is expected to nominate Gina McCarthy, currently assistant administrator with the Environmental Protection Agency, to head the agency on Monday. The nomination requires a Senate confirmation.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

President Obama plans to announce three Cabinet-level nominations Monday, including a new administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, who could be on the hot seat in the looming battle over global warming.

Gina McCarthy, currently an assistant administrator in the wing of the EPA that regulates air pollution, is the president's pick to head the EPA.

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Africa
5:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Ethnic Violence Haunts Kenya's Presidential Election

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Kenya votes for a new president today for the first time in five years. It's an important election, in part because the country is still haunted by the ethnic violence that bloodied the last presidential election in 2007. More than 1,200 people were killed and the violence only ended after the international community stepped in. NPR's Gregory Warner is out visiting polling stations and talking to people in Nairobi. He joins us to talk about the election. Good morning, Greg.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Business
5:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Winery To Experiment With 'Drunken Treasure'

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: drunken treasure.

Some wine connoisseurs say that wine recovered from shipwrecks has a unique taste. Could be sheer age but it might be something else about the aging process at the bottom of the ocean.

JIM DYKE: The ocean providing a sort of constant motion to the wine as it sits on the bottom, pressure is different, lack of light, temperature.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Analysis
5:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

President Obama spent part of the weekend reaching out to members of Congress. He's still looking for some alternative to the budget cuts that he ordered on Friday. A federal law required the automatic spending cuts and they went into effect, despite widespread agreement that the manner of the cuts was not very bright.

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Around the Nation
5:01 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Hard-Hit Boise Subdivision Lacks Owner-Occupied Homes

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The housing market is recovering in much of the country, not so much in Idaho. Home prices dropped by 46 percent in the Boise area during the financial crises. Forty-six percent. Today's business bottom line takes us to the home of a family that rode out the crash and are still waiting for better times. Here's Molly Messick of Boise State Public Radio.

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Middle East
3:27 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Palestinians Still Feel The Squeeze Of The Restrictions On Gaza

A Palestinian laborer works at the site of a residential construction project funded by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip, on Mar. 21, 2012.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 10, 2013 8:43 am

The streets of Gaza are busy, but they are also crumbling.

Since Hamas took control of the Gaza Strip in 2007, Israel has maintained tight limits on shipments of anything that could be used for military purposes. That includes basic building materials that could be used for bunkers and rocket launching sites.

Ask businessman Ali Abdel Aal what's the toughest thing for him to find, and he'll tell you "cement and gravel."

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The Salt
3:25 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Selling Kids On Veggies When Rules Like 'Clean Your Plate' Fail

Good advice, but strict rules at mealtime may backfire.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 5:14 pm

If you're a parent, you've probably heard remarks like this during dinner: "I don't like milk! My toast is burnt! I hate vegetables! I took a bite already! What's for dessert?" It can be daunting trying to ensure a healthy diet for our children. So it's no wonder parents often resort to dinner time rules.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Your Child's Fat, Mine's Fine: Rose-Colored Glasses And The Obesity Epidemic

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 8:30 pm

About 69 percent of American adults are overweight or obese, and more than four in five people say they are worried about obesity as a public health problem.

But a recent poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health revealed a curious schism in our national attitudes toward obesity: Only one in five kids had a parent who feared the boy or girl would grow up to be overweight as an adult.

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Environment
12:52 am
Mon March 4, 2013

After Keystone Review, Environmentalists Vow To Continue Fight

Demonstrators carry a mock pipeline as they pass the White House to protest the Keystone Pipeline, in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 18, 2012.
Rod Lamkey Jr. The Washington Times /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 2:33 pm

Environmentalists have a hope.

If they can block the Keystone XL pipeline, they can keep Canada from developing more of its dirty tar sands oil. It takes a lot of energy to get it out of the ground and turn it into gasoline, so it has a bigger greenhouse gas footprint than conventional oil.

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Shots - Health News
12:43 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Scientists Report First Cure Of HIV In A Child, Say It's A Game-Changer

HIV particles, yellow, infect an immune cell, blue.
NIAID_Flickr

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 4:35 pm

Scientists believe a little girl born with HIV has been cured of the infection.

She's the first child and only the second person in the world known to have been cured since the virus touched off a global pandemic nearly 32 years ago.

Doctors aren't releasing the child's name, but we know she was born in Mississippi and is now 2 1/2 years old — and healthy. Scientists presented details of the case Sunday at a scientific conference in Atlanta.

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9:38 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Midwest Energy Cooperative reports 3,000 customers without power

Lead in text: 
As of Sunday night most outages were in Mattawan, Lawton and Schoolcraft
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
UPDATE: Midwest Energy Cooperative said in a news release at 8:10 p.m. that a major transmission line serving four substations is down. Crews have been dispatched, but no timetable for repairs or restoration of service was given. MATTAWAN, MI -- More than 3,000 customers of Midwest Energy Cooperative in the Mattawan, Lawton and Schoolcraft areas were without electric service as of 8 p.m.
Education
4:35 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Teaching 2.0: Is Tech In The Classroom Worth The Cost?

Students at Westlake High School in Waldorf, Md., participate in an interactive digital conversation with historian Kenneth C. Davis about late 19th and early 20th century American history on Thursday. The school uses a state of the art "telepresence center" for students to connect with experts all over the world.
NPR Celeste Headlee

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 5:05 pm

The hallways at Westlake High School in Maryland are just like thousands of other school hallways around the country: kids milling around, laughing and chatting on their way to class.

On a recent morning, about 30 kids took their seats in a classroom that initially seems like any other. The major difference here is that instead of a chalkboard and a lectern at the head of the class, there are two enormous flat-panel screens and thin, white microphones hanging in four rows across the ceiling.

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Author Interviews
3:07 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

Time Rules In Jamaica Kincaid's New Novel, 'See Now Then'

Jamaica Kincaid, author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, lives in Vermont.
Kenneth Noland Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 8:44 pm

Author Jamaica Kincaid is out with a new novel, her first in 10 years.

Kincaid is perhaps best known for her books At the Bottom of the River and The Autobiography of My Mother. Her new book, See Now Then, tackles some difficult themes.

The novel opens with a scene of a seemingly idyllic home life in small-town New England. But it is soon clear the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Sweet is anything but sweet.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:07 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

At 100, Composer Margaret Bonds Remains A Great Exception

Margaret Bonds in 1956. Born in Chicago in 1913, Bonds became one of the first African-American female composers to gain recognition in the United States.
Carl Van Vechten Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 4:35 pm

Margaret Bonds, who died in 1972, is perhaps near the top of the very short list of African-American female composers. Thanks to her partnerships with Langston Hughes and soprano Leontyne Price and others, she's remembered in some circles as an important figure in American composition. But, mostly, she's been forgotten.

"It's amazing that people don't know who she was, although she was quite well known in her time," says Louise Toppin, an opera singer and a voice professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:06 pm
Sun March 3, 2013

The Movie Alex Karpovsky Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Luis Guzman and Adam Sandler in Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch Drunk Love.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 4:35 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Author Interviews
5:21 pm
Sat March 2, 2013

For Ireland's First Female President, 'Everybody Matters'

Mary Robinson was Ireland's first female president. A former United Nations High Commissioner and activist lawyer, she has advocated for human rights around the world.
Jurgen Frank Jurgen Frank

For seven years, Mary Robinson served as the first female president of Ireland. Yet, she also has a long record of service as a human rights advocate.

After leaving office in 1997, she was appointed as the High Commissioner for Human Rights at the United Nations. She now runs The Mary Robinson Foundation — Climate Justice. This week, she has a new book out called Everybody Matters: My Life Giving Voice.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Sat March 2, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction: 'Call Me?' And 'Leave Me In London'

Originally published on Sun March 3, 2013 3:21 am

NPR's Bob Mondello and Tamara Keith read excerpts from Round 10 of our Three-Minute Fiction contest. Saturday's excerpts are from the stories "Call Me?" by Anna Geletka of Greenville, N.C., and "Leave Me In London," by Taylor Sykes of West Lafayette, Ind. Read the full stories below and see other submissions and past winners on our Three-Minute Fiction page.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Sat March 2, 2013

Sequester Without The Politics

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee.

Coming up, why women are still struggling for equality in the workplace, the latest submissions from our Three-Minute Fiction contest and an interview with a mysterious band, Rhye. But first...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "YESTERDAYS")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Who's afraid of the big bad sequester?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: The sequester...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: Obama sequestration...

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #4: Sequestration.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Sat March 2, 2013

Recovering Amidst A Gender Gap

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee.

Coming up, diplomacy in the Middle East. We'll talk about John Kerry's first trip abroad as secretary of State. And later, the movie that David Duchovny could watch a million times.

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Music Interviews
1:50 pm
Sat March 2, 2013

Rhye: Men Of Mystery Find A Feminine Sound

Rhye is the duo of Mike Milosh and Robin Hannibal. Their debut album is called Woman.
Dan Monick Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 9:39 am

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Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: 'Whitey Bulger,' 'Salt Sugar Fat' And Historical Language

An early mug shot shows James "Whitey" Bulger in 1953.
Boston Police

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 12:40 pm

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Commentary
8:11 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Pianist Van Cliburn, Warmed Russian Hearts During Cold War

Van Cliburn accepts flowers from the audience in the Moscow Conservatory in April 1958, after a performance during the first International Tchaikovsky Competition, which he won.
Courtesy Van Cliburn Foundation AP

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 6:35 pm

Van Cliburn thawed out the Cold War.

He went to Moscow in 1958 for the first International Tchaikovsky Competition. When he sat down to play, Russians saw a tall, 23-year-old Texan, rail thin and tousle-haired, with great, gangly fingers that grew evocative and eloquent when he played the music of the true Russian masters — Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky, and Borodin.

Cliburn died Wednesday at his home in Fort Worth, Texas. He was 78.

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NPR Story
6:05 am
Sat March 2, 2013

'It Can't Go On Forever': Michigan Steps In To Help Detroit

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 11:04 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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NPR Story
6:05 am
Sat March 2, 2013

Dealing With 'Root Causes' To Tackle Incarceration Rates

Originally published on Sat March 2, 2013 11:04 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Scott Simon. Jeffrey Beard has watched America's prisons grow larger and larger every year adding prisoner after prisoner. He began working in the Pennsylvania Corrections system in the early 1970s when there were about 8,000 prisoners. He was secretary of corrections by the time he left in 2010 and by that time Pennsylvania had more than 50,000 people in its prisons.

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