Author
7:32 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

The Submission: A book about 9/11, that's not actually about 9/11

Author Amy Waldman
Credit Pieter M. Van Hattem

In 2011, Amy Waldman’s debut novel The Submission, made its way onto numerous “best” lists. Esquire Magazine named it the book of the year, and NPR called it one of the year’s top ten. Since then, The Submission has been part of many communities’ reading programs, and is now the Kalamazoo Public Library’s Reading Together selection.

Read more
Local Music
7:32 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Saline Fiddlers offer opportunities for kids through playing old-time fiddle music

The Saline Fiddlers performing in Germany during the summer of 2009.

The Saline Fiddlers are coming to the First Congregational Church in Battle Creek this coming Sunday. The group is made up of high school and middle school students from Saline that play old time fiddle tunes.

Read more
Commentary
5:34 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Cologne: Cultural Choice Or Necessity?

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Can we keep evolving as we get older? That's a question comedian and commentator Kevin Heffernan decided to explore. And his approach to changing himself was an aromatic one.

KEVIN HEFFERNAN, BYLINE: Cologne, it's a life choice. Some say it's hereditary. If your dad did it, you will. Like what sports team you root for or circumcision. Some say it's cultural. Some say it's a necessity.

Read more

Frank Morris has supervised the reporters in KCUR's newsroom since 1999. In addition to his managerial duties, Morris files regularly with National Public Radio. He’s covered everything from tornadoes to tax law for the network, in stories spanning eight states. His work has won dozens of awards, including four national Public Radio News Directors awards (PRNDIs) and several regional Edward R. Murrow awards. In 2012 he was honored to be named "Journalist of the Year" by the Heart of America Press Club.

Morris grew up in rural Kansas listening to KHCC, spun records at KJHK throughout college at the University of Kansas, and cut his teeth in journalism as an intern for Kansas Public Radio, in the Kansas statehouse.

Around the Nation
5:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Drought-Stricken Plains Farmers 'Giddy' Over Heavy Snow

Kirk Sours says heavy snow creates extra work on his ranch, but he's thrilled that the pending melt will bring his otherwise dry pastures much-needed moisture.
Frank Morris/KCUR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

Two rapid-fire snowstorms belted Kansas with more than 2 feet of snow this week. They caused thousands of accidents and all kinds of hardships — but they also produced very broad smiles from some quarters.

That's because in a place as dry as Kansas has been lately, a blizzard can be a blessing for farmers and ranchers.

Read more
The Salt
5:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

In Kazakhstan, No Horror At Horse Meat

Signs advertise the type of meat sold in each section of the Green Market in Almaty, Kazakhstan.
Sly06/Flickr

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:24 pm

Though the thought of horse meat in British lasagna or Ikea meatballs may be stomach-churning to some people, in some cultures the practice of eating horse meat is not just acceptable, it's a treat. NPR's Peter Kenyon just returned from the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan and checked out the meat market at the Green Bazaar in Almaty.

Read more
U.S.
5:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Steamship Anchors A Community, But Its Days May Be Numbered

The nation's last coal-burning ferry, the SS Badger, sits on Lake Michigan in the port town of Ludington, Mich. The EPA permit that has long allowed the ship to dump coal ash into the lake is now under review.
Courtesy photo for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:50 pm

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the tiny town of Ludington, Mich., is home port to the last coal-fired ferry in the U.S. The SS Badger has been making trips across the lake to Manitowoc, Wis., during the good-weather months since 1953. And as it runs, the 411-foot ferry discharges coal ash slurry directly into the lake.

An Environmental Protection Agency permit allows the Badger to dump four tons of ash into the lake daily. But now, the agency has put the permit under review — and that means the Badger could stop sailing.

Read more
Remembrances
4:43 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Three Motown Artists Die Within Weeks Of Each Other

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

Audie Cornish has more on three Motown artists who died recently — Bobby Rogers, a founding member of the hit-making Motown group the Miracles; Richard Street, a member of the Temptations; and Damon Harris, who sang with the Temptations on many of their hits.

All Tech Considered
4:24 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Street Lights, Security Systems And Sewers? They're Hackable, Too

An analyst works at a federal cybersecurity center in Idaho in 2011. Experts say Internet-connected infrastructure is a possible target of cyberwarfare.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 6:05 pm

Allegations that the Chinese military has been hacking U.S. corporations are raising tensions. But in the case of a full-fledged cyberwar, things would look very different.

Read more
Music Reviews
3:50 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Latin Gold In The Frozen North At Toronto's Lula Lounge

Lula Lounge: Essential Tracks." href="/post/latin-gold-frozen-north-torontos-lula-lounge" class="noexit lightbox">
Jane Bunnett's "Ron Con Ron" is featured on Lula Lounge: Essential Tracks.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 5:34 pm

For years, Canada has welcomed waves of newcomers from Latin America and the Caribbean. A thriving music scene has grown out of this migration — like the one at Lula Lounge, a nightclub in a working-class neighborhood of Toronto. The club's co-founder, Jose Ortega, cut his teeth in New York's legendary Latin scene. When he came to Toronto, he found the vibe fresher, more open to experimentation. And he found talent. It was just a matter of time before the country produced great Latin bands.

Read more
The Picture Show
2:10 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Asylum Suitcases, Found And Photographed

Freda Bowker suitcase, part of the New York State Museum collection of suitcases from the Willard Asylum
Jon Crispin

Ed. Note: This article was originally published Nov. 2, 2011.

Photographer Jon Crispin has a fascination with things that are left behind. Those are his exact words. "Even as a kid I was trying to get into places I shouldn't go," he says on the phone.

In the '80s he was basically given free rein to document abandoned asylums in New York state. He has also worked closely and often with the New York State Museum, including on some Sept. 11 preservation projects.

Read more
Religion
1:55 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

The Papal Conclave: What To Expect From The Next Pope

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 2:06 pm

More than 100 Cardinals from around the world started meeting Monday at the Vatican to begin the process of choosing a new pope. This comes after the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. The Cardinals are tasked with choosing the man who will lead the Catholic Church into a new era.

Opinion
1:55 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Op-Ed: There's An App For Everything, And That's A Problem

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 2:58 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And now for the Opinion Page. Technology has always promised to fix our imperfections. In this 1950s TV ad, G.E. swore that a new refrigerator-freezer combo would make a housewife's problems disappear.

(SOUNDBITE OF ADVERTISEMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: We didn't have all this storage space in the door or conveniences like a butter conditioner, sliding shelves.

Read more
Economy
1:55 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

State Of Emergency: Cities In Financial Crisis

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 2:37 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington; Neal Conan is away. Year by year, cities are raising fees and cutting public services to stay out of financial trouble. For some cities, that's just not enough. Detroit projects a $200 million deficit this year, and the city owes $14 billion in long-term obligations. The state's Republican Governor Rick Snyder says there's probably no city more financially challenged in the entire United States.

Read more
Movie Interviews
1:53 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Mike White On Creating HBO's 'Enlightened' Whistle-Blower

In HBO's Enlightened, Laura Dern stars as corporate executive Amy Jellicoe, who returns from a post-meltdown retreat to pick up the pieces of her broken life. Series creator Mike White stars as Tyler, Amy's friend and co-worker.
Lacey Terrell HBO

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 2:51 pm

The HBO series Enlightened wrapped up its second season Sunday night. The show began as the story of a woman — the naive, idealistic, manipulative, determined and sincere Amy Jellicoe, played by Laura Dern — trying to put her life back together in the wake of a breakdown. After spending a couple of months at a New Age recovery center in Hawaii, Amy attempts to apply what she has learned to her life back in the real world of corporate America.

Read more
Movie Reviews
1:53 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Cinerama Brought The Power Of Peripheral Vision To The Movies

A film still of New York City from 1952's This Is Cinerama. The film was meant to introduce audiences to the new Cinerama widescreen.
Flicker Alley LLC

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 2:51 pm

As early as silent film, directors attempted to create widescreen images. But in the 1950s it became a commercial necessity to give the multitude of new TV watchers what they couldn't get on a small screen. So even before CinemaScope, VistaVision, Todd-AO and Panavision, there was Cinerama — a process in which three projectors threw three simultaneous images onto a gigantic curved screen. Cinerama offered what no TV or movie screen could provide before — peripheral vision, which could make you feel as if you were really in the midst of the action.

Read more
Politics
1:02 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Obama Announces His Picks For EPA, Other Cabinet Posts

President Obama rounds out his Cabinet for his second term, nominating three new leaders Monday: Walmart Foundation's Sylvia Mathews Burwell for budget chief, MIT scientist Ernest Moniz to head the Energy Department and veteran regulator Gina McCarthy to run the EPA — a post that's likely be a lightning rod during Senate confirmations.

Forbes list of billionaires
12:17 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Forbes list of billionaries includes heirs of Stryker founder, retired CEO

Stryker Headquarters - file photo

The Stryker Corporation figures prominently in Forbes Magazine's list of the world's billionaires.

Read more
Movies
11:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

'Bless Me, Ultima' Role A 'Gift From Heaven'

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:51 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Now we'd like to tell you about a film that took an unusually long and winding path to the big screen. The film is called "Bless Me, Ultima." It's based on the best-selling novel by Rudolfo Anaya. It's both one of the most loved, most popular and most controversial novels in the modern American canon.

Read more
Politics
11:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Sequestions And Answers

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:51 pm

Lawmakers failed to avert across-the-board spending cuts to the federal government, and they officially kicked in last week. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax, and The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy about what it all really means.

Business
11:58 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Yahoo: A Telecommunication Breakdown?

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:51 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, it's been called a landmark in the American literary canon. Certainly it's one of the premier works of Chicano literature. Now it's finally made its way to the big screen. We are going to speak with its star, herself a well-loved pioneer among Latina actresses. Her name is Miriam Colon and she's with us in just a few minutes to tell us about "Bless Me, Ultima."

Read more
Kenyan Elections
10:32 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Paw Paw couple updates from Kenya as voting is underway

Kenya
Credit Peacemaking in Africa Blog

A Paw Paw couple is helping to monitor the elections being held in Kenya. Joe and Kathy Ossman have been writing about their experiences as election observers on their blog - Peacemaking in Africa

Read more
10:10 am
Mon March 4, 2013

State officials want to expand "Pure Michigan" into international markets

Lead in text: 
Director says expansion is next obvious step after regional and national campaigns
An ambitious five-year strategic plan for Michigan's tourism industry aims to draw far more travelers to the state, boost the economic impact by nearly 20 percent and begin to take the "Pure Michigan" brand around the world.
Read More: http://mibiz.com
Sequestration in Michigan
8:55 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Michigan Citizen Action Director calls for "balanced approach" to deficit reduction

File photo of W.K. Kellogg Airport in Battle Creek. The tower could be closed because of federal sequestration.
Credit The Associated Press

The sequester has been place since Friday. The across the board spending cuts went into effect when no agreement could be reached on a deal to reduce the federal budget deficit. Michigan Citizen Action Executive Director Linda Teeter spoke with WMUK's Gordon Evans on the cuts Monday morning.

Read more
7:55 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Enbridge declines to pay for new studies on oil spill damage

Lead in text: 
Company says the data has "already been collected"
The pipeline company responsible for the 2010 tar sands oil spill that fouled almost 40 miles of the Kalamazoo River is refusing to pay $800,000 to complete two new studies to assess the spill's damage.
7:45 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Education officials brace for federal cuts

Lead in text: 
Berrien RESA Superintendent says programs like Head Start may be cut by sequestration.
BERRIEN SPRINGS - Congress' inability to reach an agreement on across-the-board budget cuts will likely mean a loss of $357,113 in federal funds for the Berrien Regional Education Service Agency.
Around the Nation
7:09 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Lock-Picking Class Is Popular In Oakland

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 1:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Burglary is a big problem in Oakland, California. So Mayor Jean Quan opened the door to some harsh criticism when her weekly newsletter of community events advertised a lock-picking class. Learn the art for only $40. Some residents were unhinged, but organizers say the course is for hobbyists, not criminals. The mayor apologized, but the advertising seems to have worked - the class was sold out. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:38 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Snyder offers some clues of what he wants in Emergency Manager for Detroit

Lead in text: 
Governor not naming candidates while Detroit considers whether to appeal finding that Detroit is in "financial emergency."
Detroit - Gov. Rick Snyder hasn't yet revealed his pick for Detroit emergency manager, but he's offering some clues into what he's looking for as speculation mounts over who might assume the unprecedented role.
6:34 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Expanding preschool access in Michigan has broad support

Lead in text: 
Bipartisan support at both the state and federal level gives hope to advocates of early childhood education
Early education advocates who have long lamented the lack of preschool slots in Michigan are buoyed by pledges this year from Gov. Rick Snyder and President Barack Obama to make preschool funding a priority. Snyder, a Republican, proposes $130 million more for Michigan's Great Start Readiness Program for low- and moderate-income kids over two years.
6:27 am
Mon March 4, 2013

Forestry bill concerns environmentalists

Lead in text: 
Senator Tom Casperson says he wants DNR to hear from business and recreational interests, not just environmentalists.
More than 4 million acres of state forest land could become more susceptible to disease and tree-killing pests if an Upper Peninsula state senator's bill becomes law, scientists and environmentalists opposed to the measure say. The bill introduced by Sen.

Pages