The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Can U.S. Embassies Be Safe Without Being Unsightly?

The U.S. Embassy in central London in 2009.
Shaun Curry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 7:05 pm

There's been a tug of war between aesthetically pleasing and safe when it comes to American embassies around the world.

Many embassies have been slammed as bunkers, bland cubes and lifeless compounds. Even the new Secretary of State John Kerry said just a few years ago, "We are building some of the ugliest embassies I've ever seen."

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Marcie Sillman arrived at KUOW in 1985 to produce the station's daily public affairs program, Seattle After Noon. One year later, she became the local voice of All Things Considered, NPR's flagship afternoon news magazine. After five years holding down the drive-time microphone, a new opportunity arose. Along with Dave Beck and Steve Scher, Marcie helped create Weekday, a daily, two-hour forum for newsmakers, artists and thinkers.

The Salt
5:03 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Family Dinner: Treasured Tradition Or Bygone Ideal?

From left: 8-year-old Celedonia, 3-year-old Gavin, Amy Spencer and Doug Brown gather around the kitchen as Doug prepares a fruit salad for dinner.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 3:06 pm

When we asked you (via our Facebook page) to tell us about the weekday challenges your families face, given the competing demands of work, commutes, schoolwork and activities, you didn't hold back. Especially on the subject of squeezing in a family dinner.

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Music News
4:59 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Women Of Grunge Reclaim Rock History In 'These Streets'

Ron Nine, Mitch Ebert, Eden Schwartz, Fiia McGann and Gretta Harley perform in These Streets, a new play based on a series of interviews with Seattle musicians.
Courtesy of These Streets

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 7:05 pm

Gretta Harley arrived in Seattle in 1990, when grunge was redefining the city. Bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden were turning Seattle into the epicenter of the music world. Harley was a punk rock guitarist searching for her tribe, and in Seattle's thriving music scene, she found it.

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Middle East
4:08 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Sanctions Bite, But Iran Shows No Signs Of Budging

An Iranian woman shops at a supermarket in the capital, Tehran, on Feb. 22. International sanctions have hurt Iran's economy, but prospects for a breakthrough on Iran's nuclear program are dim as negotiators meet in Kazakhstan.
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 12:31 pm

A new round of international talks on Iran's nuclear program is under way in Kazakhstan, where the U.S., Britain, France, China, Russia and Germany are asking Iran to give up any thought of building a nuclear weapon in exchange for relief from sanctions.

Western leaders do not predict a breakthrough, but they say small steps could be taken that would increase confidence on both sides.

Still, it's hard to imagine how such negotiations could proceed with lower expectations for progress.

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3:15 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Stadium Drive-US 131 interchange upgrade proposed

Lead in text: 
The project would cost $27.5 million. A public "open house" meeting to discuss it will be held Tuesday, March 5th, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Oshtemo Community Center at 6407 Parkview.
KALAMAZOO, MI -- The Michigan Department of Transportation is proposing to reconstruct the U.S. 131 interchange at Stadium Drive in 2014. The proposed project would include rebuilding a mile of Stadium Drive between 11th Street and Seneca Lane, rebuilding the U.S. 131 and Stadium Drive interchange and upgrading and widening the intersection at Stadium Drive and Drake Road.
Commentary
3:05 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Historical Vocab: When We Get It Wrong, Does It Matter?

Linguist Geoff Nunberg finds that in the film Lincoln, screenwriter Tony Kushner oscillates between old and modern meanings of "equality."
DreamWorks/Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 7:12 pm

Has there ever been an age that was so grudging about suspending its disbelief? The groundlings at the Globe Theatre didn't giggle when Shakespeare had a clock chime in Julius Caesar. The Victorians didn't take Dickens to task for having the characters in A Tale of Two Cities ride the Dover mail coach 10 years before it was established. But Shakespeare and Dickens weren't writing in the age of the Internet, when every historical detail is scrutinized for chronological correctness, and when no "Gotcha!" remains unposted for long.

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Law
2:17 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

The Conservative Case For Gay Marriage

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 11:15 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

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From Our Listeners
2:17 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Letters: Chicago Violence, 3-D Printing

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 2:26 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your comments. Last week, we talked about violence in Chicago after the death of Hadiya Pendleton, the teenager shot and killed just a week after she visited Washington for the inauguration. Gun laws in Chicago are more restrictive than it its suburbs and in surrounding states like Indiana.

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Race
2:17 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

The Trayvon Martin Case And The National Conversation

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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The Salt
1:56 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

How The Food Industry Manipulates Taste Buds With 'Salt Sugar Fat'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 12:46 pm

Dealing Coke to customers called "heavy users." Selling to teens in an attempt to hook them for life. Scientifically tweaking ratios of salt, sugar and fat to optimize consumer bliss.

In his new book, Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Moss goes inside the world of processed and packaged foods.

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WMUK News
12:38 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Frog survey volunteers needed in Michigan

Hunting frogs in a Barry County fen
Credit Jim Harding / MSU

It may not look like it now but frogs will soon be calling in southwest Michigan. In only a few weeks, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources will begin its 18th annual survey of the state’s frog and toad population. The project depends heavily on volunteer “citizen scientists” to gather the data.
 

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Around the Nation
12:26 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Trayvon Came Back For George, Says Brother

The shooting of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin one year ago became an international story, and raised difficult questions about race and justice. Host Michel Martin continues her conversation with Robert Zimmerman Jr., the brother of accused killer George Zimmerman, about how his family views the case and the public reaction.

Around the Nation
12:24 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Zimmerman's Brother: 'Truth Will Be Revealed In Court'

Unarmed Florida teenager Trayvon Martin was shot and killed one year ago today. Host Michel Martin speaks with Robert Zimmerman Jr., the brother of accused shooter George Zimmerman, about his brother's actions that night and the upcoming trial.

Parenting
12:22 pm
Tue February 26, 2013

Bullying And Psychiatric Illness Linked

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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The Sequester: Cuts And Consequences
11:56 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Educators Brace For Sequestration

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now we turn to a political stalemate that seems to be turning into a crisis. We've been talking about the across-the-board cuts to the federal budget that seem more and more likely to go into effect this Friday because Congress and the White House have not agreed on a deficit reduction plan. It's being called sequestration.

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Culture
11:53 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Spring Festival celebrates Indian culture with food, Bollywood music

Dolly dancing in the WMUK studio
Credit Rebecca Thiele, WMUK

Imagine a giant snowball fight, only instead of snow, everyone has a handful of a different colored powder. That’s what the Hindu holiday of Holi is like in India. Here in Michigan, the India Association of Kalamazoo will hold its Spring Festival on Saturday to celebrate Holi and other Indian festivals that mark the coming of spring.

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Around the Nation
7:42 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Whistling Man Is A Nuisance In Portland, Maine

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Residents of Portland, Maine, said they found Robert Smith a little too obviously cheerful. Mr. Smith had a habit of whistling while standing outside of homes and businesses. A city ordinance lists whistling as disorderly behavior, with a fine of up to $500. But the Portland Press-Herald reports Smith reached a compromise with police. He agreed to whistle only while in motion, not standing in one place.

(SOUNDBITE OF WHISTLING)

World
7:33 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Female Sherpa Makes Record Climbs

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Few can say they've reached the summit of Mt. Everest, and even fewer can say they've done it twice. And only one woman can say she's done it twice in one month. Her name is Chhurim, a 29-year-old Sherpa from Nepal. She made the climb last May, came down for a few days and then turned around and went up again. This week, she climbed into the Guinness Book of World Records.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

6:47 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Alamo Township Board tables noise ordinance, sends back to Planning Commission

Lead in text: 
Much of concerns is over how ordinance would impact Kalamazoo Speedway.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
ALAMO TOWNSHIP, MI -- A proposed noise ordinance for rural Alamo Township has been tabled after drawing hundreds of people, most of them opponents, to a township board meeting for the second time in a month.
6:33 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Sales tax on services seen as one possible way to pay for road repairs

Lead in text: 
Lawmakers are looking for alternative to Governor Snyder's proposal to increase gas taxes and vehicle registration fees.
Lansing - Some state lawmakers are flirting with the idea of levying a sales tax on services to help pay for road repairs as business leaders are pressuring the Legislature to approve large increases in gas taxes and vehicle registration fees.
6:24 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Michigan Department of Transportation makes case for more road funding to Holland officials

Lead in text: 
Members of policy committee question fairness and how money is distributed to local governments
The Michigan Department of Transportation Monday pleaded its case for raising the gas tax to the Macatawa Area Coordinating Council.
6:15 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Rally for immigration reform in Kalamazoo

Lead in text: 
The Michigan Organizing Project staged rally, which included many personal stories from immigrants.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI -- When Jenn Amaya's mother left for a trip to her home in Mexico in 2009, Jenn didn't think it would be the last time she would see her mom.
NPR Story
5:21 am
Tue February 26, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

If you were to open a new brick-and-mortar bookstore, New York City would be a very pricey place to do it. Manhattan boasts some of the world's most valuable land - and, as it turns out - air. And that is our last word in business this morning.

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NPR Story
5:21 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Witnesses To Take The Stand In BP Trial

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Today, a federal judge in New Orleans hears from witnesses to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. A civil trial of BP opened yesterday in a case to determine blame and financial liability for the environmental disaster that was the worst disaster in U.S. history.

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Music Interviews
4:03 am
Tue February 26, 2013

The Floacist: A Soul Poet Says Yes To Moving On

Floacist Presents: Floetry Rebirth." href="/post/floacist-soul-poet-says-yes-moving" class="noexit lightbox">
Natalie "The Floacist" Stewart's second solo album is Floacist Presents: Floetry Rebirth.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:44 am

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WRVO/Central New York reporter for the Innovation Trail

It's All Politics
3:27 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Loaded Words: How Language Shapes The Gun Debate

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:44 am

The country has been debating gun regulations for months. Later this week, a Senate committee will start work on various proposals, including a background check on every gun sale and a ban on assault weapons.

But this debate over guns goes beyond disagreements about policy. Advocates on both sides quite literally disagree on the terms of the discussion — as in, the words they use to describe it.

Ask "gun control advocates" to describe what this debate is about, and they'll say "control" really isn't the word they prefer.

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All Tech Considered
3:25 am
Tue February 26, 2013

Seeking A 'Field Of Dreams' For A Rising Drone Industry

Joe Kummer, president of Propulsive Wing in Elbridge, N.Y., is rooting for having a drone test site in upstate New York. He says it could save him trips to the West Coast to try out new drone prototypes.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:44 am

In three years, the federal government is expected to open the skies for the civilian use of drones. But before that, the Federal Aviation Administration will set up six drone test sites around the country. Stiff competition to get one of the sites is anticipated — driven by hopes of attracting thousands of new jobs.

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Religion
3:24 am
Tue February 26, 2013

The Hermit Pope Who Set The Precedent For Benedict XVI

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 9:15 pm

Beneath a glass coffin, wearing a pontiff's miter and faded vestments of gold and purple, there lies a tiny man with a wax head.

This represents an Italian priest who, until this month, was the only pope in history to voluntarily resign.

His name is Celestine V.

Celestine became pope at 84, some seven centuries ago, after a long and self-punishing career as a hermit.

Though a celebrated spiritual leader, and founder of a new branch of the Benedictine order, his papacy lasted just over five months. It's widely viewed as an utter disaster.

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