Politics
10:09 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Obama Announces Commerce, Trade Nominees

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with two new cabinet appointments.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: This morning, President Obama appointed Penny Pritzker to run the commerce department.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Pritzker is an heiress to the Hyatt hotel empire. She also served on the president's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, and she is a long time financial backer of the president's political campaigns. Forbes ranks her as one of 300 richest Americans.

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Around the Nation
7:48 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Employees Agree To Wear Company Logo Tattoo

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

How much do you love your employer? Probably not as much as some employees at Rapid Realty in New York. Their boss offered a 15 percent raise to anyone willing to get a tattoo of the company logo, and 40 people took him up on it. We have something similar at NPR. For a marketing campaign, I got a mean MORNING EDITION tat on my forearm. There's a photo of it at our Facebook page. No raise involved. I do feel pretty cool, though that might last as long as the tattoo, which is temporary.

Europe
7:48 am
Thu May 2, 2013

British Charity Tries To Get Kids Outside To Play

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Aiming to get more children to play outdoors, Britain's National Trust created a list of the 50 Things To Do Before You're 11 3/4. Things like climb a tree and cook on a campfire. Enough finished the 50 that the trust used social media to gather more ideas for getting kids away from social media.

Some are quite poetic: Catch a falling leaf. Jump over waves. Hold a scary beast. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:36 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Michigan House Committee considers merits of taxing Internet purchases

Lead in text: 
Michigan treasury estimates $460-million in sales taxes from remote Internet purchases will go uncollected this fiscal year
Lansing - Internet retailers that have a physical presence or affiliated companies in Michigan would have to collect sales taxes on purchases under legislative proposals debated Wednesday in a House committee. The House Tax Policy Committee held public testimony on GOP-sponsored legislation that would change the definition of legal presence for out-of-state companies that sell merchandise toMichiganians on the Web.
7:28 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Audit raises concerns about use of antipsychotic drugs at home for vets

Lead in text: 
Home in Grand Rapids hasn't had an on-site psychiatrist since 2011
LANSING - Residents at the Grand Rapids Home for Veterans are given antipsychotic drugs at a far higher rate than residents of Michigan nursing homes, yet the home has no staff psychiatrist, according to a state audit released today. The report by Auditor General Thomas McTavish says 40.9% of the home's 509 residents were given antipsychotic drugs.
7:23 am
Thu May 2, 2013

House approves denying welfare for using drugs, truancy

Lead in text: 
Republicans say bill provides oversight of taxpayer dollars, Democrats say it targets vulnerable citizens
LANSING - Welfare reform that would deny benefits to people who test positive for drugs or whose child is truant from school passed the state House of Representatives on Wednesday.
Business
6:59 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Facebook Releases Quarterly Earnings Report

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with profits for Facebook.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Facebook announced its latest quarterly results, reporting revenues just under $1.5 billion.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The company showed a profit of nearly $220 million for the quarter but this fell short of analysts' expectations. CEO Mark Zuckerberg blamed the missed target on higher costs. Company spending is up 60 percent this quarter over the previous one due to hiring and new developments.

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6:49 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Peters formally launches campaign for Senate

Lead in text: 
Congressman tries to retain Democratic seat held by retiring Carl Levin
Rochester - U.S. Rep. Gary Peters became the first candidate Wednesday to enter the race for the first open U.S. Senate seat in Michigan in two decades, making the announcement at a business his great-great grandfather once established.
6:46 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Berrien County road manager fired after less than five months on job

Lead in text: 
Wayne Schoonover had continued working for his previous employer - Ionia County
BENTON TOWNSHIP - Wayne Schoonover has been fired as managing director of the Berrien County Road Commission after less than five months on the job.
6:42 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Former Benton Harbor City Manager hired in Bangor

Lead in text: 
Richard Marsh chosen from field of five finalists for job
BANGOR - Former Benton Harbor city manager Richard Marsh is the Bangor City Council's choice to manage the city.
6:24 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Calhoun County Prosecutor finds no evidence of corruption in Battle Creek Police Department

Lead in text: 
Police Chief wants apology from City Commissioner Andy Domenico
Battle Creek's police chief is demanding an apology after the county prosecutor said a city commissioner has no evidence of corruption. "I think his behavior insinuating that the Battle Creek Police Department is corrupt has been reckless and embarrassing and he owes the Battle Creek Police Department and the people of Battle Creek a public apology," Chief Jackie Hampton said.
National Security
5:02 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Hunger-Striking Detainees At Guantanamo Are Force-Fed

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 2:06 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The Guantanamo Bay detention center had more or less faded from the news until this week, when President Obama called it unsustainable. He and others are paying attention now because of an ongoing and growing hunger strike of at least - as of this morning - 100 prisoners. More than 20 are being force fed to keep them alive.

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Politics
4:41 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Ahead Of Obama Trip, Mexico Alters Cooperation Agreements

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Mexico's agonizing war on its drug cartels is about to change and President Obama is about to hear it personally from Mexico's new president. On a trip to Mexico that begins today, Mr. Obama will also focus on trade and economic opportunities between the two countries.

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Business
4:41 am
Thu May 2, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today, is austerity at the French presidential palace.

President François Aland has already enacted several cost-cutting measures since being elected last year.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

He's cut a fleet of presidential and government cars and reduced ministerial salaries, and now he's raiding the wine cellars for which the presidential palace is famous.

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It's All Politics
3:04 am
Thu May 2, 2013

How Will Obama Make His Case On Syria?

President Obama speaks at a news conference Tuesday. He addressed the use of chemical weapons in Syria and said he's weighing his options.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

The U.S. role in the civil war in Syria has been limited to humanitarian aid and nonlethal equipment for the rebels. But that may change with recent revelations about the use of chemical weapons.

Polls show that Americans are still not paying close attention to the conflict, but there is a reluctance to intervene — a byproduct of the experience in Iraq.

President Obama says he's weighing all options. Whatever he decides, he'll have to make a case to the U.S. public.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Recovery Begins For Mother, Daughter Injured In Boston

Celeste Corcoran is transported to Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital on April 28.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 4:19 pm

The number of Boston bombing victims still in the hospital dropped to 19 as of Wednesday evening. The great majority have gone home or to a rehab facility.

That's what has happened with Celeste and Sydney Corcoran, a mother-daughter pair who ended up in the same hospital room after being struck down by the first marathon bomb blast.

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Health
3:02 am
Thu May 2, 2013

New York Tobacco Regulations Light Up Public Health Debate

The New York City Council is considering a number of regulations on cigarettes, including raising the minimum age for buying cigarettes to 21.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:09 am

If you're under 21, you may soon have a hard time lighting up in New York City. Public health officials in New York want to raise the minimum age for buying cigarettes.

The initiative is one of three proposed tobacco regulations the City Council will debate at a hearing Thursday afternoon.

"We think if we can prevent people from taking up the habit before they're 21, we might just be able to prevent them from taking it up at all," says New York Health Commissioner Thomas Farley.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Iggy Pop: 'What Happens When People Disappear'

Iggy & The Stooges just released a new album, Ready to Die.
David Raccuglia Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 6:55 pm

Of the many things made in Michigan that have become part of the fabric of American culture — the auto industry, Motown — punk rock is often overlooked. In 1967, years before The Sex Pistols performed incendiary anthems, Iggy Pop and his band The Stooges created an explosive new sound in Detroit that would influence generations of musicians.

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Justice for Maurice Henry Carter
9:42 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

A quest for justice and the bond of friendship in play at WMU

Von Washington and other actors in rehearsal
Credit WMUK

Report by WMUK's Gordon Evans

The true story of a friendship that grew out of a quest for justice is the basis of the play Justice for Maurice Henry Carter.

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The Salt
6:40 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

The four cuts at the top of this skull "are clear chops to the forehead," says Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley. Based on forensic evidence, researchers think the blows were made after the person died.
Donald E. Hurlbert Smithsonian

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

"First they ate their horses, and then fed upon their dogs and cats, as well as rats, mice and snakes."

So says James Horn of the historical group Colonial Williamsburg, paraphrasing an account by colony leader George Percy of what conditions were like for the hundreds of men and women stranded in Jamestown, Va., with little food in the dead of winter in 1609.

They even ate their shoes. And, apparently, at least one person.

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Business
5:59 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Deal To Protect Bangladeshi Factory Workers Still Elusive

NPR

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

This week, major retailers including Wal-Mart, Gap and others met with labor activists in Germany, hoping to hammer out a deal to improve working conditions in Bangladesh.

The meeting came less than a week after a devastating building collapse in the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka, killed more than 400 workers. At the meeting, activists pushed retailers who use factories in Bangladesh to start spending their own money to make those workplaces safer.

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Shots - Health News
5:51 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Second Thoughts On Medicaid From Oregon's Unique Experiment

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

Two years ago, a landmark study found that having Medicaid health insurance makes a positive difference in people's lives.

Backers of the program have pointed to that study time and again in their push to encourage states to expand the program as part of the federal health law.

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All Tech Considered
5:21 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

How One College Is Closing The Computer Science Gender Gap

Harvey Mudd President Maria Klawe often uses her longboard to get around campus and chat with students like senior Xanda Schofield.
Wendy Kaufman NPR

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

This story is part of our series The Changing Lives of Women.

There are still relatively few women in tech. Maria Klawe wants to change that. As president of Harvey Mudd College, a science and engineering school in Southern California, she's had stunning success getting more women involved in computing.

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Local Music
5:19 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Soloists acknowledge their roots with KSO's 'A Night of Musical Promise'

Alpin Hong
Credit alpinhong.com

Pianist Alpin Hong and violinist Jun-Ching Lin are the featured soloists in a free collaborative concert this Thursday called A Night of Musical Promisewhich will include over 170 young performers who participate in a variety of regional music programs. 

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World
4:51 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Why Chemical Weapons Have Been A Red Line Since World War I

Soldiers with the British Machine Gun Corps wear gas masks in 1916 during World War I's first Battle of the Somme.
General Photographic Agency/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

President Obama has said that the use of chemical weapons could change the U.S. response to the Syrian civil war. But why this focus on chemical weapons when conventional weapons have killed tens of thousands in Syria?

The answer can be traced back to the early uses of poison gas nearly a century ago.

In World War I, trench warfare led to stalemates — and to new weapons meant to break through the lines.

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Africa
4:45 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

S. African Leader Under Fire After Awkward Visit With Mandela

In this image taken from video, South African President Jacob Zuma sits with ailing anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela on Monday. Mandela was hospitalized in late March with a lung infection, and in images from the visit, appeared largely unresponsive.
SABC AP

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

In South Africa, controversial images of a frail and ashen Nelson Mandela being visited by South Africa's current president aired on national television this week. Some people claimed it was a political publicity stunt.

The footage is fueling fresh debate about what is proper and what constitutes invasion of privacy regarding the ailing, 94-year-old former president and anti-apartheid legend.

President Jacob Zuma, accompanied by two other top officials of the governing ANC party, visited Mandela at his Johannesburg home on Monday.

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Shots - Health News
4:37 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

A Sleep Gene Has A Surprising Role In Migraines

Bates experienced migraines as a child. She made this painting to depict how they felt to her.
Courtesy of Emily Bates

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 10:33 am

Mutations on a single gene appear to increase the risk for both an unusual sleep disorder and migraines, a team reports in Science Translational Medicine.

The finding could help explain the links between sleep problems and migraines. It also should make it easier to find new drugs to treat migraines, researchers say.

And for one member of the research team, Emily Bates, the discovery represents a personal victory.

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SW Michigan
3:50 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Eight State House Dems get their committees back

Michigan State Capitol Building
Credit Melissa Benmark / WKAR

Eight state House Democrats who lost their committee assignments Tuesday got them back Wednesday.

Republican House Speaker Jase Bolger of Marshall removed the lawmakers, including Representative Kate Segal of Battle Creek, saying they had missed too many committee meetings. But the Gongwer News Service says Bolger reversed the decision after what he called “positive” meetings with the eight legislators.

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3:43 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Albion thinking about closing its high school

Lead in text: 
The district's school board plans to hold a public forum on the issue Thursday at 6 p.m. at the high school library.
ALBION - The Albion Public Schools Board of Education is sure it wants to keep grades kindergarten through eight in the district, the board president said Wednesday, but is considering outsourcing its high school grades to cover a $1 million budget shortfall. Board President Al Pheley said Wednesday that the board is giving serious consideration to four options.
Afghanistan
3:16 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Secret Cash To Afghan Leader: Corruption Or Just Foreign Aid?

Afghan President Hamid Karzai acknowledged a report this week that the CIA has regularly been sending him money. Afghans seem to have mixed feelings. The president is shown here speaking at an event in Kabul on March 10.
S. SABAWOON EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 7:48 pm

After a report in The New York Times this week, Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai has acknowledged that the CIA has been secretly delivering bags of money to his office since the beginning of the war more than a decade ago.

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