Business
6:48 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Spice Girls Musical To Close Early

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now our last word in business. Critics and ticketholders wanted something more from the Spice Girls musical. So the last word in business today is: sad spice.

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6:37 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Palisades Nuclear Power Plant shut down for repairs

Lead in text: 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission monitoring repairs
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
SOUTH HAVEN, MI -- Palisades nuclear power plant has been shut down for repairs, according to officials at the plant. The plant was removed from service Sunday morning for inspections and repairs to the safety injection/refueling water tank, according to Palisades spokesperson Lindsay Rose.
6:30 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Michelle Grevenstuk of Otsego wins women's Kalamazoo Marathon

Lead in text: 
Finishes marathon in just under three hours
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Michelle Grevenstuk approached the Kalamazoo Marathon with a "why not" attitude. The 31-year-old Otsego resident competed in the inaugural 26.2-mile run at the Borgess Run for the Health of It in Kalamazoo two years ago, she was a spectator last year and on Sunday she was a winner.
6:28 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Justin Gillette wins men's Kalamazoo Marathon

Lead in text: 
Goshen, Indiana runner wins marathon for second straight year
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Justin Gillette seemed to thoroughly enjoy himself during the Kalamazoo Marathon Sunday. The professional marathoner from Goshen, Ind., was encouraging spectators at spirit stations along the course to cheer louder, he high-fived a few others and he got a crowd gathered downtown to laugh when he made an unexpected stop to answer nature's call in a porta-potty.
Around the Nation
5:25 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Harper Lee Sues Over 'Mockingbird' Copyright

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 6:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now, from one American institution to another.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD")

GREGORY PECK: (as Atticus Finch) The defendant is not guilty. But somebody in this courtroom is.

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Middle East
5:25 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Thousands Of Syrians Ride Buses To Refugee Camps

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 11:54 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Syria has accused Israel of flagrantly violating international law after a series of airstrikes on targets near the Syrian capital over the weekend. Now, Israel has not officially accepted responsibility, but Israeli sources say the targets included Iranian-made missiles bound for Hezbollah fighters in neighboring Lebanon.

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Analysis
5:25 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 6:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And we have Cokie Roberts on the line. She joins us most Mondays. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi, David.

GREENE: So one of those last words in Emily piece, tightrope, I mean, that...

ROBERTS: Right.

GREENE: ...feels like that's where President Obama is on Syria. I mean, he was already in a difficult position, and now we have an American ally we believe bombing Damascus. What sort of position is the White House in?

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It's All Politics
3:46 am
Mon May 6, 2013

McConnell Tries To Show He's Still At Home In Kentucky

After years in the halls of Congress, Republican Mitch McConnell has to convince Kentucky voters that he's still paying attention to what they want.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 8:51 am

Republican Mitch McConnell has been the Senate minority leader since 2007, and he's the longest-serving senator in the history of Kentucky. He's up for re-election next year — and polling in the state shows his popularity is suffering.

If the Republicans can snag a half-dozen more seats in the Senate in 2014, McConnell could finally become majority leader. But first, he has to convince Kentuckians he's not out of touch with them.

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Around the Nation
3:45 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Chicago's Famed Field Museum Struggles To Dig Out Of A Hole

"Sue," the Tyranosaurus rex skeleton, is one of the most famous exhibits at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History
John Zich AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 8:25 pm

The economy may be on the rebound, but many cultural institutions are still struggling to regain their financial footing. That's especially true for one of the country's most recognized museums — the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. Known internationally for its research as well as its exhibits, the Field Museum must pay off millions in bond debt — and toe an ethical line as it does.

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Europe
3:44 am
Mon May 6, 2013

Kerry's Visit To Russia A Chance To Talk Syria, Mend Fences

Secretary of State John Kerry is headed to Russia on Monday — a trip he calls "long overdue."
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 9:47 am

Secretary of State John Kerry sets off for what he calls "a long overdue" trip to Russia on Monday, and Syria is likely to top the agenda.

But U.S.-Russian relations are frosty these days. The U.S. is imposing targeted sanctions on Russian human rights violators, while Moscow is preventing American families from adopting Russian children.

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National Security
5:55 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

The Hidden Cost Of The Drone Program

A model of a drone is hoisted in the air at a protest of the U.S. military's use of drones during a demonstration on April 3 in New York.
Don Emmert AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 4:02 pm

A faint light has begun to shine in recent weeks on the secretive U.S. program of drone strikes and targeted killings.

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Religion
5:03 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Search For Faith In 'Godless' Washington

The National Cathedral in Washington, D.C, is one of the world's largest cathedrals, and the seat of the Episcopal Church.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 4:03 pm

War has brought the act of faith to the forefront for those who occupy the White House. President Lincoln famously issued a call to prayer during the Civil war. Franklin Roosevelt announced D-Day to the nation with a prayer.

Today, President Obama receives a daily spiritual meditation. The man who sends those messages is a Pentecostal minister named Joshua DuBois.

When he first moved to Washington, D.C., DuBois says he had already formed an impression about the spiritual life of the town.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
5:02 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

The Movie Derek Cianfrance Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Actors Ray Liotta (from left), Robert De Niro, Paul Sorvino and Joe Pesci in Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas.
Warner Bros. Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 7:20 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Music Interviews
3:49 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Funky-Fresh Sound From Somalia, With A Political History

The cover image of Dur-Dur band's Volume 5.
Album cover

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 7:20 pm

Imagine the capital of Somalia, Mogadishu, in the 1980s. You can't, right? Neither can most music critics. That's why the recent re-release of a record by a popular '80s-era Mogadishu dance band has caught the attention of critics lately.

The founders of Dur-Dur Band now live in Columbus, Ohio. Weekends on All Things Considered asked members Abdinur Daljir and Sahra Dawo to go to a studio there — accompanied by an interpreter — to talk about the newly reissued record and the story that precedes it.

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Author Interviews
3:43 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

A Tale From The Delta, Born Of The Blues

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 7:20 pm

Bill Cheng's new novel, Southern Cross the Dog, is deeply rooted in the Mississippi Delta. It follows the story of one boy after he survives the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and spends the next few decades as a refugee, an abandoned orphan and then an itinerant laborer.

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The Record
5:28 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

Big Songs, Big Hype (Oh Yeah, They're Women)

Lauren Mayberry of Chvrches performs at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, in March.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 1:19 pm

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Middle East
5:28 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

Syrian Rebel Leader: We Won't Share U.S. Arms With Extremists

Free Syrian Army fighters sit behind an anti-aircraft weapon in Aleppo, Syria, in February. The rebels say U.S.-provided weapons would help in their fight against Bashar Assad's regime.
Abdullah al-Yassin AP

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 11:01 am

The Obama administration says it's considering providing arms to rebels fighting to bring down Syrian President Bashar Assad if the U.S. can confirm his forces did in fact use the debilitating nerve gas sarin in recent attacks. Coupled with news that Israel reportedly launched an airstrike at a target in Syria to prevent a shipment of missiles from reaching Hezbollah, these events could represent a game changer in the conflict-ravaged nation.

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Interviews
4:52 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

Diary Of A Gitmo Detainee

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 5:28 pm

This week, Slate magazine published excerpts of the 466-page memoir of Guantanamo detainee Mohamedou Ould Slahi. It's a remarkable account of the interrogation methods that were used by the U.S. and their effects. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Kelly McEvers talks to Larry Siems, who posted the memoirs.

Around the Nation
4:52 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

Schools On Military Bases Also Fall Victim To Sequester Cuts

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 5:28 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's been two months since the across-the-board budget cuts known as sequestration officially went into effect. The decision on that was made here in Washington, but the effects are being felt all over the country. Take, for example, a chunk of money called impact aid.

JACK BOOGAARD: There's three different kids that can receive this type of money called impact aid.

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Sports
12:07 pm
Sat May 4, 2013

A 'Decadent And Depraved' Derby With Hunter S. Thompson

When illustrator Ralph Steadman accepted an assignment with writer Hunter S. Thompson at the Kentucky Derby, he never imagined the weekend that would ensue. Here, Steadman depicts the race's winner, a colt named Dust Commander.
Ralph Steadman

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 6:27 pm

In the spring of 1970, a British illustrator named Ralph Steadman had just moved to America, hoping to find some work. His first call came from a small literary journal called Scanlan's. It was looking for a cartoonist to send to the Kentucky Derby. Steadman had heard of neither the race nor the writer he was to accompany, a fellow named Hunter S. Thompson.

Steadman hadn't read any of Thompson's work, and he certainly didn't know that the writer had a bit of a drinking tendency, but he agreed to go.

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Sat May 4, 2013

World War II Code Is Broken, Decades After POW Used It

As a prisoner of war, Sub Lieut. John Pryor encrypted information and requests for supplies in letters sent from a German camp to his family in Cornwall.
Plymouth University

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 6:04 am

It's been 70 years since the letters of John Pryor were understood in their full meaning. That's because as a British prisoner of war in Nazi Germany, Pryor's letters home to his family also included intricate codes that were recently deciphered for the first time since the 1940s.

Pryor's letters served their purpose in World War II, as Britain's MI9 agents decoded the messages hidden within them — requests for supplies, notes about German activities — before sending them along to Pryor's family in Cornwall.

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Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat May 4, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Maron, Violent Minds And A Classic Documentary

Marc Maron, whose latest book is Attempting Normal, is also the author of The Jerusalem Syndrome: My Life As a Reluctant Messiah.
Leigh Righton Spiegel & Grau

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 12:44 pm

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Economy
5:51 am
Sat May 4, 2013

More Jobs, But Wait: They May Not Pay Much

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. The economy added 165,000 jobs in April. That exceeded the expectations of economists. It also drove down the unemployment rate to a four-year low, 7.5 percent. Unfortunately, the biggest gains were in lower-paying fields like hospitality and temp agencies. And as the school year comes to a close and young people start looking, the question is will there be enough work for them. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

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Middle East
5:51 am
Sat May 4, 2013

Places Transformed: Syrian Refugees Overwhelm Camps, Towns

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Latin America
5:51 am
Sat May 4, 2013

On Mexico Trip, Obama Maintains Economic Focus

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. President Obama is in Costa Rica today. He's talking with leaders of Central American nations about security and economic trade. Yesterday, the president wrapped up a two-day visit in Mexico, where he tried to steer the focus away from contentious issues like immigration and drug violence. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports from Mexico City.

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: During their quick visit, Presidents Obama and Pena Nieto stuck to their focus: the economy.

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Movie Interviews
5:51 am
Sat May 4, 2013

'The Great Gatsby': Retold Again, With A Distinct Treatment

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR.

A Blog Supreme
5:03 am
Sat May 4, 2013

At Jazz Fest, Photographers Have A Culture All Their Own

Little Freddie King at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, 2013, photographed by Skip Bolen.
Courtesy of Skip Bolen

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:53 am

The 2013 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival wraps up Monday. This weekend and last, 12 stages have mixed such marquee names as Fleetwood Mac, Phoenix and Los Lobos with dozens of local bluesmen, soul belters and Cajun fiddle players.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:50 am
Sat May 4, 2013

Who's Carl This Time

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:56 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at New York University's Skirball Center for the Performing Arts in New York City, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
3:50 am
Sat May 4, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 11:56 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now onto our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill-in-the-blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Carl, can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL: Mo Rocca has the lead, Peter. He has four points. Paula Poundstone has three, Tom Bodett has one.

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