World
4:42 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

As Myanmar Reforms, Old Tensions Rise To The Surface

A Myanmarese girl carries away a tin roof in Meiktila, Myanmar. Violence between Buddhists and Muslims in March destroyed large areas of the town and left thousands of Muslims homeless.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 4:57 pm

The town of Meiktila in central Myanmar presents a tranquil scene on a hot April day: A woman presses juice from sugar cane while customers loll around in the midday heat. The town is right in the center of the country, on a broad and arid plain where white cows graze among palm trees and pointy pagodas. It's a bustling trading post on the road between the capital, Naypyidaw, and the country's second-largest city, Mandalay.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:12 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Philadelphia Case Exposes Deep Rift In Abortion Debate

Dr. Kermit Gosnell is an abortion provider who was charged with killing a patient and seven babies.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 12:15 pm

This is the sixth week of the trial of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, the physician charged with five counts of murder in the deaths of a woman and infants at the Philadelphia abortion clinic he owned and operated.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:09 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

How Obama's Response To Terrorism Has Shifted

President Obama makes a statement in the White House briefing room just a few hours after the bombings at the Boston Marathon on April 15.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 4:57 pm

President Obama's time in office has not been defined by terrorism as President George W. Bush's was. Yet incidents like the one in Boston have been a regular, painful through line of his presidency.

When a new administration walks into the White House, nobody provides a handbook on how to respond to a terrorist attack. So the Obama administration has been on a steady learning curve.

Read more
3:57 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Flooding receeds a foot-per-day in Grand Rapids

Lead in text: 
Due to heavy rains these past weeks, Grand Rapids beat its 104-year-old record for rainfall in the month of April. It surpassed rainfall in April 1909 by more than two inches.
GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The Gerald R. Ford freeway exits to Market Avenue, closed during the recent record flood, are now open. The ramps are the latest to open among several announced today by the Michigan Department of Transportation. Water from the Grand River is receding at a rate of about one foot per day.
Global Health
2:34 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Deadly Strain Of Bird Flu Is 'Most Lethal' Flu Virus Yet

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
2:29 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Surviving Tragedy: The Various Paths Beyond

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. While funerals and memorial services continue for those killed by bombers in Boston and a fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas, we want to talk today with survivors of traumatic events like those, from car accidents to hurricanes, and ask how you deal with the range of emotions and the range of questions - maybe newfound appreciation for life or survivor's guilt, maybe even blame.

Read more
Politics
2:13 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

When Conscience Conflicts With Constituents

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Sanford trails in South Carolina, the Democrats get it on in Massachusetts, and the lady from Maine scoffs at sequestration. It's Wednesday and time for a...

SEN. SUSAN COLLINS: Manufactured crisis...

CONAN: Edition of the political junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

Read more
Author Interviews
2:05 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

'Let's Explore': David Sedaris On His Public Private Life

This American Life and in The New Yorker, and have now filled seven essay collections -- most recently, Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls." href="/post/lets-explore-david-sedaris-his-public-private-life" class="noexit lightbox">
David Sedaris' stories have appeared on This American Life and in The New Yorker, and have now filled seven essay collections -- most recently, Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls.
Hugh Hamrick Little, Brown and Co.

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 7:43 pm

David Sedaris writes personal stories, funny tales about his life growing up in a Greek family outside of Raleigh, N.C., about working as an elf in Santa's workshop at Christmastime, and about living abroad with his longtime partner, Hugh.

Read more
WMUK News
1:53 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Michigan's air quality gets better, and worse

MSU researchers use a mobile lab to check air pollution levels
Credit Thomas Gennara/MSU / AP Photo

The quality of the air in southwest Michigan took a hit last year. But a new report by the American Lung Association suggests that, in general, Michigan’s air is getting better.

The State of the Air 2013 report gives Allegan County an “F” and Kalamazoo County a “C” for ozone levels. But both got much better marks for soot and other particulates. No data was collected in Calhoun, Van Buren, and Saint Joseph counties.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:26 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

In the Golan Heights: Stray Bullets And Spring Cleaning

Israeli students snap photos of the Syrian landscape from Mount Bental in the Golan Heights, which is occupied by Israel. Israelis have even watched Syrian troop and rebel movements from here.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun April 28, 2013 9:52 am

Spring in the Golan Heights is beautiful. The hills are light yellow-green. The scrawny arms of young cherry trees are covered with small blossoms almost all the way back to their thin trunks.

Apples, from last season, are ridiculously cheap and starting to soften, but if you put your nose close to a bagful and inhale you'll breathe their fragrance. The views are uncluttered by desert dust.

Read more
Book Reviews
1:14 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

'Equilaterial': Martians, Oil And A Hole In The Desert

Johan Swanepoel iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 10:08 am

Equilateral is a weird little novel, but any reader familiar with Ken Kalfus expects his writing to go off-road. Kalfus wrote one of the best and certainly the least sentimental novels about New York City post-9/11. I loved A Disorder Peculiar to the Country, but I stopped assigning it to students in my New York lit class because they were usually turned off by its black humor and lack of uplift. Equilateral doesn't run that same risk of being in bad taste as social commentary because, at first, it doesn't seem to have anything to do with current events.

Read more
Wisdom Watch
12:04 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

From The Border To The Fortune 500

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our Wisdom Watch conversation. That's where we speak with people who've made a difference in their fields.

Today, we hear from one of the most influential tech executives you probably have never heard of unless you're in that field. Not only that, his personal story is just as - if not more - interesting than those of the superstar CEOs you may have heard about in high tech.

Read more
Religion
12:01 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Muslims On Boston Bombings: We're All Disgusted

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we will meet one of this country's most influential tech executives. We'll also hear about his very interesting personal story about how he rose from humble beginnings in Mexico to become one of this country's top leaders in high tech. That's later in the program.

But, first, we want to continue our conversation with three thoughtful Muslim Americans in the wake of the attack on the Boston Marathon and the news that two of the suspects were indeed Muslim.

Read more
Economy
11:53 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Help Wanted, But Only Part Time

In today's economy, many people in search of work can only find part-time jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics finds the number of 'involuntary' part-time workers has doubled since 2006. Host Michel Martin talks about what this means for the workplace and the economy, with The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy.

11:50 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Snyder backs some of reform team's proposals for classroom

Lead in text: 
Group has been subject of heavy criticism. Snyder says he likes idea of using technology to improve performance in classroom
Lansing - Gov. Rick Snyder on Tuesday embraced classroom technology innovation that is part of a controversial reform group's study and said he wants to make the reformers' secret "skunk works" project an "official" government initiative.
11:09 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Kalamazoo Township adds gender identity, sexual orientation to equal employment policy

Lead in text: 
City of Kalamazoo passed a similar ordinance in 2008. It was the subject of a referendum, but upheld by voters in 2009
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO TOWNSHIP, MI -- The Kalamazoo Township Board of Trustees voted this week to add language to its equal opportunity employer policy. Board members added that the township will not discriminate against gender identity, sexual orientation, or genetic information.
10:49 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Battle Creek Fire Chief retiring

Lead in text: 
Larry Hausman has been a firefighter for 40 years, the last 15 as chief of the Battle Creek Fire Department
Battle Creek Fire Chief Larry Hausman has spent hours cleaning his office as he prepares to retire from the fire service. The pictures, memorabilia and files are gone as he ends a career he has always loved. "It doesn't seem possible," he said Tuesday, "after you have worked all your life and are in a routine of working.
9:54 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Republican operatives weigh options for U.S. Senate race next year

Lead in text: 
Congressman Mike Rogers seen as solid choice for Senate, Representative Justin Amash as the anti-establishment candidate
Longtime Michigan Republican operatives are open about their desire see Rep. Mike Rogers run in the state's open-seat Senate race, but they're worried Rep. Justin Amash -- who possesses little regard for the GOP establishment -- won't let the possibility of a damaging primary derail his ambition for a seat in the upper chamber.
Portage Superintendent Search
9:06 am
Wed April 24, 2013

What's next for Portage Schools Superintendent search?

Portage Central High School - file photo
Credit WMUK

Interview with Julie Mack

The Portage School Board is weighing its next move after the sole finalist for superintendent took his name out of consideration on Monday. 

Read more
Around the Nation
7:34 am
Wed April 24, 2013

TV Captioning Service Apologizes For Identity Mistake

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Some of the media made mistakes during coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing. A sign of integrity is whether you correct them. A TV captioning service apologized for its mistake. Viewers in Dallas saw the bombing suspect misidentified. The screen read: "Marathon Bomber: He is 19-year-old Zooey Deschanel." For the record, the suspect is 19-year-old Chechen immigrant Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and not the star of the TV series "New Girl." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

KPS Bond Proposal
7:26 am
Wed April 24, 2013

$62-million bond proposal for Kalamazoo Schools on May 7th ballot

File photo
Credit WMUK

Interview with KPS Superintendent Michael Rice

Voters in the Kalamazoo Public School district will vote on a $62-million bond proposal on May 7th. It would pay for various improvements at several buildings in the district. 

Read more
Around the Nation
6:44 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Washington State Now Has Gender-Neutral Laws

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 7:20 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

It was a yeoman's task but they would never put it that way in Washington State. The state just completed a six-year effort to rewrite its laws using gender-neutral language. Terms like fisherman and freshman were replaced by fisher and first-year student. Penmanship became handwriting. More than 3,000 sections of the law were revised but some words did not change. Manhole and man lock are words that survived; they just couldn't find a better way of saying them.

6:36 am
Wed April 24, 2013

State approves Berrien County's plan for dredging

Lead in text: 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers still has to sign off on plan
ST. JOSEPH - The state Department of Environmental Quality has approved Berrien County's application for a five-year permit to dredge areas of the St. Joseph River to improve navigation for boaters.
6:25 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Portage Interim Superintendent says he won't leave district "in a lurch"

Lead in text: 
Rob Olson's contract with the Portage district runs through June 30th
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI -- Rob Olsen, the interim superintendent of Portage Public Schools, says the Portage school board is likely to meet next week to "regroup" after their sole finalist for superintendent withdrew his candidacy Monday night. "I expect they'll be meeting next week to decide what next steps to take," Olsen said.
6:14 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Celebration Cinema in Portage plans to offer food and alcohol sales later this year

Lead in text: 
Permission still needed from state Liquor Control Commission. Sales could start this fall
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
PORTAGE, MI - Sometime later this year Celebration! Cinema in Portage expects to begin serving beer, wine and mixed drinks along with food to those coming to see a movie. Kenyon Shane, vice president for Celebration!
Around the Nation
6:03 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Racin Case: Charges Dropped Against Miss. Man

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 7:20 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Here's another reminder that a fast-moving news story can completely change. Prosecutors have dropped the charges against Paul Kevin Curtis. He's the Elvis impersonator first arrested in the case of ricin being sent to U.S. officials, as we reported last week.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:03 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Boston Business Owners Allowed To Return To Bombing Site

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 7:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The massive swath of Boston that has been closed for more than a week is getting closer to reopening. City officials yesterday brought victims of the marathon bombings and their relatives in for a private visit and allowed neighborhood residents back home for the first time in over a week. Businesses also began the process of cleaning up and preparing to reopen.

The hardest-hit shops and restaurants remain boarded up. As NPR's Tovia Smith reports, others are hoping to reopen today or tomorrow.

Read more
Business
6:03 am
Wed April 24, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 7:20 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

How you like them apples? Apple is at the start of our business news.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

It's All Politics
3:26 am
Wed April 24, 2013

People On Terror Watch List Not Blocked From Buying Guns

Assault weapons and hand guns for sale.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 8:49 am

Even al-Qaida gloats about what's possible under U.S. gun laws. In June 2011, a senior al-Qaida operative, Adam Gadahn, released a video message rallying people to take advantage of opportunities those laws provide.

"America is absolutely awash with easily obtainable firearms," Gadahn says, explaining that "you can go down to a gun show at the local convention center" and buy a gun without a background check.

Then a faint smile crosses Gadahn's face. "So what are you waiting for?" he asks.

Read more
The Salt
3:25 am
Wed April 24, 2013

For Corn, Fickle Weather Makes For Uncertain Yields

By this time last year, 26 percent of the country's corn crop was already planted. A wet, cold spring means that only 4 percent is in the ground right now.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 9:06 am

Last year's drought wreaked havoc on farmers' fields in much of the Midwest, cutting crop yields and forcing livestock producers to cull their herds. This spring, the rain that farmers needed so badly in 2012 has finally returned. But maybe too much, and at the wrong time.

It's almost the end of April, which is prime time to plant corn. But farmers need a break in the rain so they can get this year's crops in the ground and try to lock in good yields at harvest.

Read more

Pages