6:23 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Portage officials pull one of four billboards from proposed outdoor advertising agreement

Lead in text: 
Acting Superintendent Rob Olson says Adams Outdoor Advertising has agreed to drop billboard at Angling Road Elementary School.
PORTAGE, MI - One of four controversial billboards to be placed on Portage Public Schools properties will be pulled under a proposal between the school district and Adams Outdoor Advertising. Acting Superintendent Rob Olsen said that Adams has agreed not to do the controversial Angling Road Elementary School billboard that was most opposed by more 75 people who turned out Feb.
6:20 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Saint Joseph City Manager Search won't include internal candidates

Lead in text: 
Commissioners say they want a candidate who has experience as a city manager.
ST. JOSEPH - St. Joseph City Commissioners have inked an agreement with the Michigan Municipal League to comb the state for candidates to replace City Manager Frank Walsh.

As NPR's senior national correspondent, Linda Wertheimer travels the country and the globe for NPR News, bringing her unique insights and wealth of experience to bear on the day's top news stories.

A respected leader in media and a beloved figure to listeners who have followed her three-decade-long NPR career, Wertheimer provides clear-eyed analysis and thoughtful reporting on all NPR News programs.

Asia
4:47 am
Tue February 12, 2013

North Korea Admits It Carried Out Nuclear Test

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 6:06 am

North Korea confirmed on Tuesday that it had successfully conducted a third nuclear test. It's an important step toward North Korea's goal of building a bomb small enough to be fitted on a missile that could reach United States.

Business
4:47 am
Tue February 12, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Let's talk about another high-profile job vacancy - this one for pontiff. Now that Pope Benedict has said he'll step down, everyone is wondering who will replace him. Our last word in business today: holy bookmakers.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Gambling houses have placed odds on who might become the next leader of the Catholic world. At the top of the list of frontrunners are men not from Europe. Names like Ghana's Cardinal Peter Turkson and Canada's Cardinal Marc Ouellette, both popular choices among the bookmakers.

Read more
Politics
4:47 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Obama Speech To Set Second Term's Tone

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 5:00 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
It's All Politics
3:45 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Fixing Long Lines At The Polls May Be Harder Than You Think

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 5:00 am

Minutes after he was re-elected in November, President Obama vowed to fix the long lines that many voters faced at the polls. He mentioned the problem again in his inaugural address. And now, the president is expected to raise it once more in the State of the Union address on Tuesday — this time with some possible solutions.

Read more
Politics
3:43 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Sen. Rubio's Response Gives GOP A Chance To Woo Hispanics

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks during a fundraiser in Altoona, Iowa, on Nov. 17. He is delivering the GOP response to President Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday night.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:44 am

Republican leaders have tapped Marco Rubio, a 41-year-old Cuban-American senator from Florida, to deliver the official GOP response to President Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday night.

It's a chance for a party that has fared badly with both young and Hispanic voters to showcase a fast-rising, youthful Latino with a new stance on immigration.

Read more
Governing
3:40 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Treasury Nominee's Citigroup Experience Raises Questions For Some

Jack Lew testifies before a House budget panel in 2011. The Senate Finance Committee is scheduled to consider Lew's nomination to be Treasury secretary on Wednesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:02 am

Jack Lew, the man President Obama has chosen to help oversee the country's biggest banks, has said it plainly — he's no expert on banking. Lew said as much when the Senate was vetting him to head the White House Office of Management and Budget in 2010.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., asked Lew if he thought deregulation of Wall Street caused the financial crisis. Lew said he didn't consider himself the best person to answer that question.

Read more
National Security
3:25 am
Tue February 12, 2013

In Cyberwar, Software Flaws Are A Hot Commodity

An analyst looks at code in the malware lab of a cybersecurity defense lab at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho, Sept. 29, 2011.
Jim Urquhart Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 8:50 am

There have been security flaws in software as long as there has been software, but they have become even more critically important in the context of cyberweapons development.

Read more
9:41 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Former Kalamazoo County Drain Commissioner dies

Lead in text: 
Bill French suffered a stroke while scuba diving in Florida in 2007.
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Former Kalamazoo County Drain Commissioner Bill French has died. French, 63, died on Saturday, according to an obituary in the Kalamazoo Gazette. French, a Republican, won the 2004 election for drain commissioner and served until 2008 when he was removed from office nearly a year after he was convicted of misdemeanor extortion.
WMUK News
9:33 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Attorneys discuss helping women facing abuse

Dancers prepare for One Billion Rising event in Kalamazoo on Valentine's Day
Credit Gordon Evans, WMUK

WMUK’s Gordon Evans reported on the One-Billion rising event to raise awareness about violence against women. He also spoke with Susan Reed, supervising attorney for the Michigan Immigrants’ Rights Center and Megan Reynolds, managing attorney of the Battle Creek office of Legal Services of South Central Michigan. 

Read more
One Billion Rising
9:31 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

One Billion Rising event in Kalamazoo

Rehearsal for One Billion Rising event
Credit Gordon Evans, WMUK

Valentine’s Day will mean dancing in the streets of Kalamazoo. The One Billion Rising event is being held Thursday to bring attention to the issue of violence against women. WMUK’s Gordon Evans reports. 

Read more
Under The Label: Sustainable Seafood
7:35 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

For A Florida Fishery, 'Sustainable' Success After Complex Process

Dennis Roseman, left, and Jamie Manganello pull in a swordfish off the coast of Florida. The Day Boat Seafood company went through a complicated process to become certified as a sustainable fishery by the Marine Stewardship Council.
Chip Litherland for NPR

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 1:19 pm

Part three of a three-part series by Daniel Zwerdling and Margot Williams.

The long, clunky-looking fishing boat pulls up to Day Boat Seafood's dock near Fort Pierce, Fla., after 10 days out in the Atlantic. The crew lowers a thick rope into the hold, and begins hoisting 300-pound swordfish off their bed of ice and onto a slippery metal scale.

Read more
Under The Label: Sustainable Seafood
6:42 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Conditions Allow For More Sustainable-Labeled Seafood

A sockeye salmon that was caught from the research vessel Miss Delta off the coast of Vancouver is examined. The MSC has certified the fish as "sustainable" even though there is concern from scientists and environmentalists.
Brett Beadle for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 1:24 pm

Part two of a three-part series by Daniel Zwerdling and Margot Williams.

Next time you walk up to the seafood counter, look for products labeled with a blue fish, a check mark, and the words "Certified Sustainable Seafood MSC." Then ask yourself, "What does this label mean?"

Read more

Gabe Bullard joined WFPL in 2008 as a reporter on the city politics beat. Since then, he's reported, blogged, hosted and edited during elections, severe weather and the Fairdale Sasquatch scare of 2009. Before coming to Louisville, Gabe lived in St. Louis, which was his home base for years of growing up, studying and interning at various media outlets around the country. 

The Salt
6:22 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Less Potent Maker's Mark Not Going Down Smoothly In Kentucky

With too little distilled bourbon to meet demand, Maker's Mark is lowering the product's alcohol content from 90 to 84 proof.
Ed Reinke AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 7:58 pm

Kentucky is bourbon country. Bar shelves in Louisville are stocked with a crowded field of premium bourbons; the city's Theater Square Marketplace restaurant alone carries close to 170 different brands. So when news trickled out that longtime distillery Maker's Mark plans to water down its bourbon, locals were stunned.

Bourbon has to be aged at least two years — and that's where Maker's Mark got in trouble. Chief Operating Officer Rob Samuels says the company simply didn't make enough.

Read more
Middle East
5:12 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Women In Prayer Shawls Detained At Judaism's Holiest Site

Rabbi Susan Silverman (center, left), the sister of American comedian Sarah Silverman, along with her teenage daughter Hallel Abramowitz (center, right), are arrested by Israeli police as they leave the Western Wall in Jerusalem, on Monday.
Jim Hollander EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 9:40 am

Police in Jerusalem on Monday detained 10 women for wearing the tallit, a Jewish prayer shawl traditionally worn by men, while praying at the Western Wall.

The Women of the Wall have been fighting for years for permission to worship in the manner that men do at the Western Wall, the holiest site in Judaism for prayer. The stone structure is part of the retaining wall that surrounded the Second Jewish Temple, which was destroyed by the Romans in A.D. 70.

Read more
Theatre
5:11 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

The Whipping Man looks at life after the Civil War

Rico Bruce Wade, Ben Riegel, and Scott Norman at Farmer's Alley Theatre.
Credit Farmers Alley Theatre

    

It the end of the Civil War when the play “The Whipping Man” opens. A young Confederate soldier who is severely wounded has just made it back home only to find that life as he knew it is gone forever. 

Read more
A Blog Supreme
4:55 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Remembering Donald Byrd, Jazz Trumpeter Who Spanned Generations

Donald Byrd onstage, in an image circulated by his record label at the time, Blue Note Records.
Echoes/Redferns Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 11:23 am

Read more
Religion
4:51 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

American Catholics Divided On Pope Benedict's Legacy

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 6:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Read more
Technology
4:11 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Video Game Violence: Why Do We Like It, And What's It Doing To Us?

A typical scene from Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, the latest in the series of wildly popular video games.
Activision

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:57 am

Violent video games have been a small part of the national conversation about gun violence in recent weeks. The big question: Does violence in games make people more violent in the real world?

The answer is unclear, but one thing is obvious: Violence sells games. The most popular video game franchise is Call of Duty, a war game where killing is the goal.

Read more
3:04 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Bed bugs force Kalamazoo branch library to close

Lead in text: 
The offending books were destroyed. Library officials say it isn't known when the Washington Square branch will re-open.
KALAMAZOO, MI - Bed bugs hiding in book bindings have caused Kalamazoo Public Library's Washington Square Branch to close on Monday. "We received a couple of books in the drop box and during a routine inspection, bed bugs were found," said Farrell Howe, a library spokesperson.

Margot Williams is a NPR News Investigations database correspondent. Along with her reporting, Williams works behind the scenes compiling, mining and analyzing data for investigative reports, ferreting for information, and connecting the dots.

Daniel Zwerdling is a correspondent in NPR's Investigations Unit.

Under The Label: Sustainable Seafood
2:38 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Is Sustainable-Labeled Seafood Really Sustainable?

Capt. Art Gaeten holds a blue shark that was caught during a research trip in Nova Scotia. Scientists are studying the impact of swordfish fishing methods on the shark population.
Dean Casavechia for NPR

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 1:19 pm

Part one of a three-part series by Daniel Zwerdling and Margot Williams.

Rebecca Weel pushes a baby stroller with her 18-month-old up to the seafood case at Whole Foods, near ground zero in New York. As she peers at shiny fillets of salmon, halibut and Chilean sea bass labeled "certified sustainable," Weel believes that if she purchases this seafood, she will help protect the world's oceans from overfishing.

Read more
Author Interviews
2:33 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

An 'Autopsy' Of Detroit Finds Resilience In A Struggling City

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Detroit native Charlie LeDuff says that the city must forget the future and instead focus on the present. His new book is called Detroit: An American Autopsy.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 10:36 am

For some, Detroit may be a symbol of urban decay; but to Charlie LeDuff, it's home. LeDuff, a veteran print and TV journalist who spent 12 years at The New York Times, where he shared a Pulitzer Prize in 2001, returned home to the city after the birth of his daughter left him and his wife — also a Detroit native — wanting to be closer to family.

Read more
Middle East
2:00 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Violence In Syria's Capital Escalates, Along With Refugee Crisis

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 9:40 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The numbers from Syria can leave you numb: nearly 700,000 refugees now in neighboring countries, and the U.N. says their numbers grow by 5,000 every day, maybe two million internally displaced, 60,000 dead again according to the U.N., and that estimate came before the most recent intensification of combat in and around Damascus.

Read more
Religion
2:00 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

After Pope's Surprise Resignation, A Flood Of Speculation

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 3:40 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Monday and time now for the Opinion Page. And after today's stunning news from the Vatican, Pope Benedict XVI plans to resign, we want to hear your opinion on his legacy. 800-989-8255 is our phone number. Email us: talk@npr.org. You can also join the conversation at our website. That's at npr.org, click on TALK OF THE NATION.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:00 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Gas, Oil Booms Bring Complications To Small Towns

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 3:39 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. There's a new generation of boom towns across the American West sparked by the explosive growth of oil and natural gas. When these industries move in, small towns near the fields change almost overnight. Once-sleepy main streets suddenly boast improved schools, libraries and community centers. Quiet rural airports expand to take corporate jets. Restaurants and motels and hardware stores all thrive.

Read more

Pages