Music Reviews
11:52 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Brad Paisley's 'Wheelhouse' Of Good Songs — And Intentions

Brad Paisley's new album is titled Wheelhouse.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:15 pm

Brad Paisley's Wheelhouse is yet another very good album from a singer, songwriter and guitarist who's made a bunch of them in a row. It features a slew of shrewd songs about finding pleasure and comfort in a frequently unpleasant, uncomfortable world. The music includes a bone-cracking song about domestic violence written from a woman's point of view, one that praises Christian values from the perspective of a jealous skeptic, and one that samples the great Roger Miller as deftly as any hip-hop production.

Read more
Interviews
11:07 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Marathoner Amby Burfoot: 'Every Mile Out There Is A Gift'

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:15 pm

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. When the bombs went off Monday, my guest Amby Burfoot was seven-tenths of a mile from the finish line. Burfoot has a special place in the history of the Boston Marathon - he was the winner 45 years ago in 1968. To celebrate the anniversary of his win every five years he runs the Boston Marathon again. Many runners have turned to Burfoot for advice over the years.

Read more
7:41 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Proposal would give schools flexibility for making up snow days

Lead in text: 
Districts are currently allowed six snow days. Some districts in northern Michigan had to take up to 12 this winter
One northern Michigan lawmaker wants local school districts to add extra hours to the school day instead of extending the academic year so excessive "snow days" don't cause some districts to come up short on state-mandated class time.
7:29 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Michigan lawmakers consider tying fuel taxes to wholesale price of gas, diesel

Lead in text: 
Governor Snyder has called for $1.2-billion to improve Michigan's roads and bridges
Lansing - The state Treasury Department could adjust the gas tax rate based on the average price of wholesale gasoline under legislation seeking to raise $1.5 billion more annually for road improvements.
Around the Nation
7:07 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Napster Billionaire Spends Big On Upcoming Wedding

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with good luck to Sean Parker and his bride-to-be. She's a singer; he's a Facebook billionaire and founder of Napster. Mr. Parker committed $10 million to their wedding. He paid for waterfalls, bridges and ancient ruins created for the occasion. Guests will wear outfits created by the costume designer from "Lord of the Rings."

Europe
7:02 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Resignation Letter Is Good Enough To Eat

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Chris Holmes worked at a London airport, but his true love was always making cakes. So Holmes decided to quit his job to run his own bake shop, which brings us to his resignation letter. He wrote it on a cake with icing. He said he wanted more time with his family. He wished his colleagues well. It took two hours, more time than he had ever spent on a birthday message or anniversary wish. A photo of his work went viral, publicity that he really felt was icing on the cake.

6:20 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Large turnout for Battle Creek workshop on illegal guns

Lead in text: 
Kalamazoo Mayor Bobby Hopewell is one of the 13 mayors of Michigan cities that have joined coalition
It was standing room only at City Hall as more than 100 people gathered to sound off on a national gun violence coalition that Battle Creek has been asked to join. City commissioners held a workshop Tuesday to discuss whether to join Mayors Against Illegal Guns, a network of more than 900 cities.

Shereen Marisol Meraji tries to find the humor and humanity in reporting on race for the NPR Code Switch team.

Her stories center on the real people affected by the issues, not just experts and academics studying them. Those stories include a look at why a historically black college in West Virginia is 90 percent white, to a profile of the most powerful and most difficult-to-target consumer group in America: Latinas.

Prior to her time with Code Switch, Meraji worked for the national business and economics radio program Marketplace, from American Public Media. There, she covered stories about the growing wealth gap and poverty in the United States.

National Security
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

FBI Encourages Public To Turn Over What They May Know

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The special agent in charge of the FBI Boston office hopes someone somewhere heard something that will point to a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATEMENT)

Read more
National Security
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Adding Security Along Marathons Would Be Herculean Task

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the twin bombings at the Boston Marathon struck at a very special type of sporting event. Marathons have been called the most democratic of sports, with the fewest physical barriers between athlete and spectator.

NPR's Mike Pesca examines whether the attack could permanently damage that accessibility.

Read more
Code Switch
4:35 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Seeking Oakland's Soul In The 'New Oakland'

A DJ plays for a crowded street at Oakland's Art Murmur celebration in February.
David Kashevaroff

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 8:17 pm

Oakland, Calif., was once a hub of African-American culture on the West Coast.

In the 1940s and '50s, Oakland was home to an entertainment corridor nicknamed The Harlem of the West. In the '60s, the city gave birth to the Black Panther Party. By the '80s, black folks made up nearly half of Oakland's population.

Read more
Animals
2:56 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Lionfish Attacking Atlantic Ocean Like A Living Oil Spill

Lionfish, like this one spotted in the Bahamas, are a nonnative predatory fish that can decimate native fish populations.
Cammy Clark MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 1:45 pm

A gluttonous predator is power-eating its way through reefs from New York to Venezuela. It's the lionfish.

And although researchers are coming up with new ways to protect some reefs from the flamboyant maroon-striped fish, they have no hope of stopping its unparalleled invasion.

Lad Akins has scuba dived in the vibrant reefs of the Bahamas for many years. But when he returned a couple years ago, he saw almost no fish smaller than his hand.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
2:55 am
Wed April 17, 2013

The Pitch For More No. 42s

Jackie Robinson during spring training at Vero Beach, Fla., in March 1956. It would be Robinson's 10th and last year with the Brooklyn Dodgers.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 2:46 pm

Yet another movie about Jackie Robinson arrived as baseball held its annual commemorative celebration of No. 42, but officials of the game are fretting over the fact that only 8 1/2 percent of current major leaguers are black.

Given that African-Americans only constitute about 13 percent of the U.S. population, and that rarely do we have any industry or school system or community population that correlates exactly to the whole country's racial or ethnic makeup, baseball's somewhat smaller black cohort hardly seems like an issue to agonize over.

Read more
Kalamazoo River Oil Spill
9:28 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

InsideClimate News wins Pulitzer for story on Kalamazoo River oil spill

Kalamazoo River - file photo
Credit WMUK

An online news organization that covers the environment related issues has won a Pulitzer Prize for its story of oil pipeline safety. Their story included a look at the 2010 oil spill on the Kalamazoo River. 

Read more
9:00 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Restrictions on who can be taken to Kalamazoo County Jail because of overcrowding

Lead in text: 
Facility will only be receiving certain offenders because it is over capacity
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
E-mails from Undersheriff Pali Matyas, including one sent out just after 9 a.m. Tuesday, said restrictions were in place at the jail given the overcrowding and the facility would only be receiving "felony warrant arrests for a crime of violence," new arrests for "either felony or misdemeanor for crimes of violence only" and new drunk-driving arrests.
7:27 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Kalamazoo Marathon organizers take extra precaution after Boston Marathon bombing

Lead in text: 
Officials want to be ready for "anything and everything" when third annual Marathon is run on May 5th
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - Blaine Lam's regularly scheduled meeting Tuesday morning with police and security officials took on a bit more importance as he continued to plan and prepare for the May 5 Kalamazoo Marathon and Borgess Run for the Health of It events.
Music Interviews
5:16 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Rachel Zeffira: An Opera 'Deserter' Embraces Dreamy Pop

Rachel Zeffira's debut solo album is titled The Deserters.
Yuval Hen Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 6:46 am

Listening to her ethereal sound, you might not guess that Rachel Zeffira was classically trained as an opera singer. But on her solo debut, The Deserters, she's not just singing: She also plays piano, synthesizers, vibraphone, cathedral organ, violin, viola, oboe and English horn.

Zeffira makes her home in London now, but she grew up in a small town in rural British Columbia and began playing music at a young age.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:16 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Background Check Battle: More Prosecution Or More Checks?

Vice President Joe Biden, holds a background check form last week in Washington, as he calls on Congress to pass legislation aimed at reducing gun violence.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 1:54 pm

One argument that some gun rights groups make against expanding background checks is that the federal government isn't doing a good enough job now of enforcing the law already on the books.

They point out that only a tiny fraction of people caught trying to buy a gun illegally are ever prosecuted.

But gun control supporters say that argument totally misses the point of background checks.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:12 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

How Congress Quietly Overhauled Its Insider-Trading Law

Vice President Biden and members of Congress watch as President Obama signs the STOCK Act on April 4, 2012. A year later, Congress moved to undo large portions of the law without fanfare.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 5:46 pm

The legislative process on Capitol Hill is often slow and grinding. There are committee hearings, filibuster threats and hours of floor debate. But sometimes, when Congress really wants to get something done, it can move blindingly fast.

That's what happened when Congress moved to undo large parts of a popular law known as the STOCK Act last week.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:28 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

'Central Park Five': Rape, Race And Blame Explored

A courtroom sketch from the first trial in the Central Park jogger case shows prosecutor Elizabeth Lederer (standing on right), the victim (on the stand) and defendants Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana and Antron McCray (on left). The high-profile case is the subject of a Ken Burns documentary, The Central Park Five, airing on PBS this month.
Daniel J. White PBS

Ken Burns has said that no matter what subjects he tackles in his documentaries — baseball or jazz, Mark Twain or the Civil War — they always seem to boil down to two things: "race and place."

That's certainly true with his latest film, The Central Park Five, which tells of the violent assault and rape of a female jogger in 1989. The place was New York City — and because of citywide racial tensions at the time, the story was seized upon by New York tabloids and national TV newscasts alike.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

How Evangelical Christians Are Preaching The New Gospel Of Adoption

We're used to thinking of adoption as a way for infertile couples or single people to start a family or take in a child in need of a home.

Read more
WMUK News
3:14 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Kellogg Foundation conference promotes racial healing

Gail Christopher
Credit W.K. Kellogg Foundation

The United States may be heading toward a "post-racial" future. But organizers of a national conference later this month say race-based discrimination and inequality are still all too real. The third annual "America Healing" conference is sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in Battle Creek. It will be held April 22-25 in Asheville, North Carolina. Last year's session was held in New Orleans.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:23 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Boston Globe Columnist: 'A Little Bit Of Freedom Taken Away'

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 3:00 pm

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. We are so saddened and outraged by the bombings yesterday at the Boston Marathon - we're going to start the show, today, with a brief call to Dan Shaughnessy, a Boston Globe sports columnist who's covered many of the Boston Marathons. He's been named Massachusetts Sportswriter of the Year eight times and seven times has been voted one of America's top 10 sports columnists by AP sports editors.

Read more
Law
2:16 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

The Immigration Bill's Chances In Congress

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington. Neal Conan is away. Though the Gang of Eight has postponed the full, public unveiling of their immigration bill until tomorrow, the rollout began in earnest over the weekend with Republican Senator Marco Rubio making the rounds on Sunday talk shows.

Read more
Around the Nation
2:14 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

The Kindness Of Strangers After The Tragedy In Boston

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 12:07 pm

In the hours after two explosions rocked the finish line at the Boston Marathon, social media was alight with offers of assistance — from restaurants inviting guests to pay what they could, to Bostonians offering couches and inflatable mattresses to anyone who needed a place to stay.

NPR's Celeste Headlee talks with three Bostonians who offered help to strangers after the crisis.


Interview Highlights

Jim Hoben, owner, El Pelon Taqueria in Boston, offered pay-what-you-can service at his restaurant.

Read more
National Security
2:10 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

What We Know About 'The Act Of Terrorism' In Boston

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:34 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington; Neal Conan is away. It's been less than 24 hours since two explosions rocked the Boston Marathon, and there are still more questions than answers about what happened. We can tell you so far that three people were killed, more than 170 injured.

Read more
SW Michigan
2:05 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

K College global prize finalists announced

Stetson Chapel at Kalamazoo College
Credit Kalamazoo College

There are three finalists for a regional prize for collaborative social justice sponsored by Kalamazoo College. The $5,000 award and a $25,000 Global Prize for Collaborative Justice Leadership are being offered by the college's Arcus Center.

Read more
Explosions At Boston Marathon
2:04 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Update On The Boston Marathon Bombings

President Obama makes a statement about Monday's explosions at the Boston Marathon. Morning Edition co-hosts David Greene and Steve Inskeep speak to NPR reporters covering the story in Washington and Boston.

Explosions At Boston Marathon
12:44 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Obama Calls Boston Bombings 'An Act Of Terrorism'

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

President Obama said the FBI is investigating Monday's twin bombings at the Boston Marathon "as an act of terrorism." Meanwhile, law enforcement officials are asking the public to submit photos and videos from the scene. And Boston Mayor Tom Menino said that as the city grieves the victims it is also proud of those who helped in the explosions' aftermath.

Education
12:25 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Sequester And Budget Add Up To Education Confusion

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later in the program, it's hard to believe but it's been 50 years since Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote his famous letter from Birmingham jail, so it's easy to forget why he wrote it and to whom he wrote it, so we thought this would be a good time to talk about that. We'll talk about the controversy it caused then and the impact it has now. That's coming up.

Read more

Pages