Europe
7:12 am
Wed August 7, 2013

American Tourist Accidentally Breaks Statue

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

7:02 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Covert Schools seeking loan to keep schools open

District facing cash flow problem because of tax ruling on the New Covert Generating Power Plant
COVERT - It appears Covert schools' fate rests on whether the district can secure a $2.5 million state loan against winter taxes.
Food
6:58 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Study: Sleep Deprivation Leads To Poor Food Choices

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

At MORNING EDITION we've eaten plenty of donuts, especially at 3 in the morning. Well, now we know why we've reached for those glazed temptations. A new study from the University of California, Berkeley, suggests sleep deprivation leads to poor food choices. Researchers found the part of the brain that enables good decisions gets hazy after an all-nighter. The part that craves rewards is revved up for more.

Right now, I'm holding a granola bar with a vanilla topping - whatever that tells you.

6:52 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Former Pennfield Superintendent had received "ineffective" ratings

Ben Laser's contract was to expire in 2015
Four months before Pennfield Schools bought out his contract, former superintendent Ben Laser was rated "ineffective" in his relationship with the Board of Education, the community and with district staff.
6:17 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Public safety tax increase approved in Pennfield

Similar proposal was rejected in May
Pennfield Township residents approved an increase to their public safety millage Tuesday. Nine hundred sixty-six residents supported the increase while484 opposed it. The vote totals Tuesday night were unofficial. The tax hike was originally proposed to voters in May, but was rejected by 24 votes in an election that saw a low voter turnout.
6:14 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Saint Joseph ISD voters reject tax proposal

Proposal would have allowed districts to levy higher tax rate
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
A Headlee override on the St. Joseph ISD's 2.75-mill special education levy failed by an unofficial tally of 1,018 votes in favor to 1,150 against. In Van Buren County, a nonhomestead tax was renewed for Lawrence schools, while Hartford Township voters renewed road and fire taxes.
All Tech Considered
5:40 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Amazon Enters Art World; Galleries Say They Aren't Worried

Amazon said its new art marketplace will provide access to more than 40,000 works of art from at least 150 galleries and dealers.
Amazon.com

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:35 am

Local record and book shops have been disappearing as the market for music and literature moves online. In the past few years, there's been a growth in sites that sell fine art on the Internet. On Tuesday, Amazon joined that market. But in this case, many brick and mortar galleries aren't seeing the Internet as a threat.

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Business
5:24 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Tensions Flare Over Rock Of Gibraltar

Once again, Spain and Britain are at odds over a tiny limestone peninsula at Europe's southern tip — Gibraltar. It's physically attached to Spain but has been a British territory for 300 years. Now some Spaniards want it back.

Business
5:24 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Want To Be A Chicken Farmer? Try It Before You Commit

The idea of raising backyard chickens has become very popular. But people who follow through on the idea don't always know what they are getting into. So a few companies are letting would-be chicken farmers try out the experience — for a fee.

Law
4:22 am
Wed August 7, 2013

With Holder In The Lead, Sentencing Reform Gains Momentum

Attorney General Eric Holder is calling for significant changes to the way the nation deals with convicted criminals. And he's not alone.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:21 am

Sit down with the attorney general to ask him about his priorities, as NPR did earlier this year, and he'll talk about voting rights and national security. But if you listen a bit longer, Eric Holder gets to this: "I think there are too many people in jail for too long, and for not necessarily good reasons."

This is the nation's top law enforcement officer calling for a sea change in the criminal justice system. And he's not alone.

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Africa
4:21 am
Wed August 7, 2013

For Ethiopian Women, Construction Jobs Offer A Better Life

Mekedes Getachew, 19, has been working at construction sites in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, since she was 15 years old. Except for the heaviest lifting, she says, the laborers "all do the same work and we don't really say this is a man's job, but when it comes to salary there's a difference." She earns $1.50 a day. Men earn $2.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 7:32 pm

Earlier this summer in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, I heard a complaint from many professionals that they could no longer find cheap house cleaners and nannies.

The apparently endless supply of girls and young women from the countryside who would work for peanuts just for a chance to move to the capital was drying up. It turns out more and more of them are finding work on one of the city's many construction sites.

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All Tech Considered
4:21 am
Wed August 7, 2013

As Twitter Expands Reach, Abuse Policy Gets Added Scrutiny

This week, several women in the U.K. went public about explicit abuse they received on Twitter.
Alastair Grant AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 12:26 pm

A series of threats and abusive messages aimed at prominent women in the U.K. have placed Twitter in an awkward spot. As the company gears up to go public and expand its brand around the world, it is increasingly running into cultural and legal hurdles that challenge Twitter's free speech ethos.

Earlier this year, Caroline Criado-Perez led a successful campaign to keep non-royal British women on the country's currency. Then last week, because of that work, the 29-year-old activist and blogger became the target of an organized barrage of hateful messages on Twitter.

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Sweetness And Light
1:12 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Dick Kazmaier, 'A Honey Of A Guy'

Dick Kazmaier of Princeton University poses with the Heisman Trophy at New York's Downtown Athletic Club before the official presentation in 1951. Kazmaier, the last Ivy Leaguer to win the Heisman Trophy, died on Thursday.
John Rooney AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 5:24 am

You may never have heard of Dick Kazmaier. After all, he played in the Ivy League, never went to the NFL and filled a position, tailback, in a formation, the single-wing, that has long since disappeared.

But as the years have passed, that is what makes Kazmaier so special: that he best represented another time, when there was more whimsy and capriciousness to college athletics.

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9:10 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Kalamazoo County Board commits $650,000 for new animal shelter

County will also contribute $200,000 a year throughout 20 year lease
  • Source: Mlive
  • | Via: Kalamazoo Gazette
KALAMAZOO, MI - The effort for Kalamazoo County and the Kalamazoo Humane Society to partner on a new animal care and resource center received new life today with a financial commitment from the county. The Kalamazoo County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to pass a two-year memorandum of understanding designed to outline its financial commitment to finding a new animal shelter.
Law
7:25 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

DOJ Sues Bank Of America Over Mortgage-Backed Securities

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The Justice Department is bringing civil charges against one of the nation's largest banks. The government alleges Bank of America made false statements about the quality of $850 million worth of home loans. Those loans were then sold to investors. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

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U.S.
6:19 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Border Drug Busts Putting Strain On Texas County's Budget

Trains that once deposited travelers for shopping and dining in dusty Sierra Blanca, Texas, no longer stop here. Interstates further eroded the local economy as more people chose to live and shop in El Paso, 85 miles away.
G.W. Schulz The Center for Investigative Reporting

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:25 pm

As they walk through the front door, visitors to the Hudspeth County Sheriff's Office in Sierra Blanca, Texas, get punched by the overpowering odor of marijuana.

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Business
6:19 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

With An Industry In Turmoil, Why Buy A Newspaper Company?

The Washington Post is now in its seventh straight year of declining revenues, says the paper's chairman, Donald Graham. Rather than continue to watch the paper struggle, Graham and Publisher Katharine Weymouth decided to look for a buyer.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 8:20 pm

Donald Graham, chairman of The Washington Post Co., is the son and grandson of its leaders for the past 80 years. And along with his niece, publisher Katharine Weymouth, Graham admitted in a video on The Post's website that the family simply didn't have the answers to questions about the paper's future.

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Environment
5:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Earth Scientists Pin Climate Change Squarely On 'Humanity'

Pedersen Glacier, 1917
Louis H. Pedersen climate.gov/National Snow and Ice Data Center

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 8:12 pm

The weather is one of those topics that is fairly easy for people to agree on. Climate, however, is something else.

Most of the scientists who study the Earth say our climate is changing and humans are part of what's making that happen. But to a lot of nonscientists it's still murky. This week, two of the nation's most venerable scientific institutions tried to explain it better.

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Environment
5:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Wells Are Running Dry In Parts Of Kansas

Nate Pike fears that wells, like this one that supplies his ranch with water, will dry up completely after years of water pumping and irrigation in Kansas.
Frank Morris KCUR

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:27 pm

Imagine enough water to fill a couple of Great Lakes, but spread under some of the driest parts of eight Western states. That was the High Plains Aquifer 60 years ago.

But now, Nate Pike, whose been riding the dry rolling ranch lands south of Dodge City, Kan., for most of his 80 years, can't even go fishing at his favorite spring called St. Jacob's Well.

"And that thing had a lot of water in it. It never went down, never changed," he says. "But as you can see now, I can't believe I can't see the water from up here."

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Pop Culture
5:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Fear Of Clowns: Yes, It's Real

Tim Curry as Pennywise in a 1990 TV adaptation of Stephen King's It. Come on, tell us you aren't just a little creeped out.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:53 am

Warning: The following story may be upsetting to some people.

That's because it's about clowns.

Yes, clowns. Painted white faces, red lips, receding hairlines with tufts of wild hair, and — of course — the red foam nose. Fun for all ages, yet plenty of people are downright scared of them. There's even a word for it: coulrophobia, though that's not an official diagnosis.

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It's All Politics
4:33 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Cory Booker: Supermayor Or Self-Promoter?

Newark Mayor Cory Booker speaks about his Senate campaign, outside the Grove Path Station in Jersey City, N.J., last month.
Ashlee Espinal The Jersey Journal/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:25 pm

In one week, voters in New Jersey go to the polls in a special primary election for a U.S. Senate seat.

No one on the ballot has more name recognition than Cory Booker, the 44-year-old mayor of Newark, who is considered a rising star in the Democratic Party. But Booker's critics say he's been more focused on his own ambitions than on governing New Jersey's largest city.

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Media
4:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

'Washington Post' May Find Conflicts In Amazon Coverage

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:25 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Music Reviews
4:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Buddy Guy: 'Rhythm And Blues' Titan Channels Guitar Wisdom

Buddy Guy's new two-disc set is titled Rhythm & Blues.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:25 pm

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From Our Listeners
4:08 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Vacation Horror Stories: Train Troubles In Budapest

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 7:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

It's time now for another one of our cautionary listener travelogues, also known by the catchier title...

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Vacation...

(SOUNDBITE OF A SCREAM)

SIEGEL: ...Horror Stories.

DORIE PICKLE: My name is Dorie Pickle. I live in Austin, Texas. If my parents are listening, I urge you to turn off the radio. I believe I've never told you this story.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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2:26 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Air Zoo to restore rare World War II fighter plane

The plane crashed into Lake Michigan during a training flight in 1944.
KALAMAZOO, MI - About 50 Air Zoo volunteers will strip mussels and rust off of a World War II era "Wildcat" fighter plane, which had been sitting at the bottom of Lake Michigan for the past 68 years. The Naval Aviation Museum Foundation announced Monday that the Air Zoo has been selected to restore the Eastern Aircraft FM-2 "Wildcat," Bureau Number 57039.
SW Michigan
2:22 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Michigan's migrant population growing

Credit WMUK

Michigan’s population of migrant farm workers is growing. State officials say the number of seasonal farm workers has risen by more than seven percent since 2006.

The Michigan Department of Civil Rights says that means the state ranks fifth in the nation in the number of registered migrant workers. It says migrants and their families add about 94,000 people to Michigan’s population. Van Buren and Ottawa counties each have more than 12,000 during the peak harvest season.

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Shots - Health News
12:43 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Falling Obesity Rates Among Preschoolers Mark Healthful Trend

This map from the CDC shows decreases (light blue) and increases (gray) in obesity prevalence among low-income, preschool-aged children from 2008-2011.
CDC

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 7:47 am

A fresh analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the tide may be turning on the childhood obesity front.

After decades of steady increases, 19 states and U.S. territories saw small decreases in their rates of obesity among low-income preschoolers. And another 20 states held steady at current rates.

A CDC map shows several Southern states — including Florida, Georgia and Mississippi — that are part of the downward trend.

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Parenting
12:11 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Parents On The Pros And Cons Of Homeschooling

Many people laud the benefits of homeschooling. But the practice also has critics. Host Michel Martin talks with a group of parents about their personal experiences: homeschooling advocate Michael Farris, dad Paul Hagen and mom Shawn Spence.

Africa
12:07 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Do Zimbabweans See Election As A Sham?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
12:07 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Brother Wants Parents To Stop Siblings' Homeschooling

College student Josh Powell says he had huge gaps in his education from being homeschooled. Now, he's advocating for his siblings to attend public school, despite a religious exception given to his family. Host Michel Martin talks to Powell about his experience.

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